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found on file in the office of the Dean of the Divinity School.

9) Nonresident work. — ^After being admitted, the student will be permitted
to substitute for resident work non-resident work, provided that: (1) The non-
resident work to be offered shall be performed under the direction of a pro-
fessor or instructor of the University Extension Division of the University, and
shall be a full equivalent in amount and character of that for which it is sub-
stituted. (2) A satisfactory examination shall be passed upon the same at the
University. (3) Not more than 9 majors of non-resident work may be offered
for the degree of D.B. and in no case will that degree be given unless the can-
didate has been in residence in the Graduate Divinity School at least thriee
quarters and has completed at least 9 resident majors.

ni. DOCTOR OP PHILOSOPHT

1) In order to be recommended by the Divinity Faculty to the Faculties
of the Graduate Schools of Arts, Literature, and Science, the candidate must
have completed a Bachelor's course equivalent to that required for the Bachelor's
degree in the University of Chicago, and in all other respects have met the
requirements for the degree as formulated by the Graduate Faculties of Arts,
Literature, and Science.

2) He must have completed 18 majors in theological study, distributed as
stated in "The Curriculum" (pp. 299-300).



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THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 307

3) He must have a reading knowledge of two languages other than
FT»gli«h (to be designated by the principal department and approved by the
Dean) containing important critical literature of his subject. Examinations
in these languages must be passed nine months before the candidate is admitted
to examination in his principal subject.

4) Having made the elections indicated on pp. 299-300, which in this case
must include also the selection of a secondary department (which may be either
in the Divinity School or in the Graduate Schools of Arts, Literatiu'e, and Science),
and having passed examinations in French and German, or two modem languages
useful to the preparation of his thesis, and having been by votQ of the Divinity
Faculty reconmiended to the Graduate Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science
at least nine months before his final examinations, and by that Facility accepted
as a candidate for the degree of Ph.D., he must continue in residence tUl the total
period has amounted to not less than twelve quarters, and until he has accom-
plished work equivalent to at least 36 majors. The amount of work required
in his principal and secondary departments will be determined by such depart-
ments, subject to the general requirements of the Ph.D. degree as fixed by the
Graduate Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science.

Graduates of other theological schools receive credit for work done in those
schools to the extent of 18 majors, but must in all cases know the ground of the
18 prescribed majors before being reconmiended to candidacy.

Of the four years thus required as a minimum for the degree of Ph.D., not
less than three must have been spent in residence at a theological school of recog-
nized high standing and the last two at the University of Chicago.

Rbm ABKs. — (1) The candidate for the degree of Ph.D. is permitted to take the degree
of A.M. or D.B. when he shall have met the requirements of such degrees. (2) The
student who has taken the degree of A.M. or D.B., and who Is thereupon accepted as a
candidate for the degree of Ph.D.. may. with the consent of the departments, offer toward
the latter degree the work he has already done in the departments which he chooses for
his principal and secondary subjects.

5) Thesis and final examination, — Each student is required to prepare a

thesis upon some question connected with his principal subject and to pass

a final examination. For further regulations respecting these see pp. 94-95.

Rbm ARK. — ^The degree of Doctor of Philoaophy is given, not on the basis of the com-
pletion of a certain amoimt of time spent upon a specified program, but as the recogni-
tion and mark of high attainments and ability in the candidate's chosen province, shown,
first, by the production of a thesis evincing the power of independent investigation and
fomilng an actual contribution to existing knowledge; and, secondly, by the passi^ of
examinations covering the general field of the candidate's subjects, with more minuteness
in the case of the principal subject, with less minuteness in the case of the secondary
subject or subjects.

DEGREES IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND
LITERATURE

Several departments of instruction being common to the Divinity School
and to the Graduate School of Arts and Literature, others in the latter school
being closely related to the work of the Divinity School, and all higher non-
professional degrees being conferred on the recommendation of the Faculty of
the Graduate School of Arts and Literature, the regulations concerning such
higher degrees conferred by the Faculty have been inserted on pp. 92-^ of this
Reffister,



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308 THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

C. THE ENGLISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Besides the general regulations of the University and the regulations of the
Divinity School, the following information and special regulations apply to the
English Theological Seminary.

GENERAL INFORMATION

1. The English Theological Seminary is open to pastors of churches, to
approved students for the ministry, and to mature men and women who, with
the commendation of their churches, propose to devote their lives to religious
work.

2. In view of the short time of resident study, the Education Society does
not undertake to render financial aid. Assistance will be given in securing such
remunerative service as may be available, though the University authorities are
strongly of the opinion that the student ought to devote his entire time and
strength to the work of the Seminary.

3. The expenses for a summer's residence are an incidental fee of $2.50 a
quarter, a library fee of $2 . 50 a quarter, and a matriculation fee of 15 . 00. The
Divinity Halls (dormitories) accommodate 140 students. The rooms are fur-
nished and are rented at from $8.00 to $12.00 a quarter. Students may secure
board in the University Commons for $3.50 a week and upw|uxi and in private
families for $3 . 00 a week and upward.

4. The expense for the non-resident correspondence courses is $3.00 for
each course.

REGULATIONS

1. Purposes, — The English Theological Seminary is intended to meet the
needs of students who have not secured the advantages of a collegiate education.
Pastors who are neither college nor divinity-school graduates, approved candidates
for the ministry whose scholastic training is deficient, and men and women who,
with the commendation of their churches, propose to devote their lives to religious
work are admitted to the English Theological Seminary.

2. Resident courses are offered in the Sununer Quarter only.

3. Non-resident courses, continuing those of the Siunmer Quarter, are offered
for the Autiimn, Winter, and Spring Quarters. These are so arranged as to sup-
plement the resident work, and in such a manner that the student is able to com-
plete, during the thirty-six weeks of non-residence, an amount of work equivalent
to that accomplished in the twelve weeks of residence. Examinations upon the
non-resident work are offered at the University at the beginning of the Summer
Quarter. (Special circulars explaining the correspondence-study work will be
sent on application.)

4. The curricxilum of the Seminary thus includes foiur years of continuous
work, namely, four Simimer Quarters in residence and twelve quarters in absence.

5. Of the 24 majors thus required, 6 may be taken in subjects preparatory
to the theological curriculum; namely. Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, History,
Evidences of Christianity, and Ethics.

6. A student may prolong his course either by residing at the University one
term during any particular Simuner Quarter, instead of the whole quarter, or by
taking a smaller number of subjects while absent from the University.



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THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 809

7. A certificate of graduation in English will be granted to each student
who (1) completes 24 majors according to the conditions named above, not more
than one-half of them bdng taken in absence; (2) presents a satisfactory thesis
upon a subject approved by the professor to whose department it pertains; the
subject must be selected and approved at least six months before the date of the
final examination; and the thesis itself must be submitted and approved six
weeks before the date of final examination; and when approved it will become
the property of the University ; (3) passes a satisfactory final examination in
addition to the regular course examinations.

Courses of instruction in the English Theological Seminary are given on
pp. 327-28.

D. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

THE DEPARTMENT OF OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE
AND INTERPRETATION

THE DEPARTMENT OF NEW TESTAMENT AND EARLY
CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

For these Departments see respectiyely the Department of Oriental Languages
and Literatures (p. 163) and the Department of New Testament and Early Christian
Literature (p. 172).



THE DEPARTMENT OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION

Shailbr Mathews, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Professor of EGstorioal and Comparative

Theology.
Gerald Birnet Sboth, A.M., D.D., Professor of Christian Theology.



Gborob Ntb Boardman, D.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of Systematic
Theology, Chicago Theological Seminary.

Clarence Auoustinb Beckwith, D.D., Illinois Professor of Systematic Theol-
ogy, Chicago Theological Seminary.

Herbert Alden Youtz, Ph.D., Professor of Christian Theology, Auburn Theo-
logical Seminary (First Term, Summer, 1917).

FELLOW, 1917-18
Albert Eustace Hatdon, Th.B., D.B., A.M.

INTRODUCTORY

The aim of the Department of Systematic Theology is to set forth and to
vindicate the content of the Christian faith and to show the vital relation between
belief and the religious life. In securing this end a constructive interpretation
of the great movements of thought in the history of Christianity is emphasized,
and the present problems of theology are discussed in their genetic relationship
with the development of the Christian religion. The biblical interpretations of
religion and the history of doctrine are thus indispensable presuppositions to the



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310 THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

constructive task of theology. The instruction in the Department has both
a scientific and a religious end, the former to promote the accurate understanding
of Christianity in its doctrinal aspect and the latter to train ministers to inter-
pret the great convictions of the Christian church.

BBQUIBBMBNTS FOB DEOBBBS OF A.M., D.B., AND PH.D.

1. The degree of A.M. is given for courses in Systematic Theology in
accordance with the regulations [onTfpage 305 of this volume. Candidates
offering courses in this Department for this degree must also have covered as
a prerequisite the following courses or their equivalents: Philosophy 2 (Ele-
mentary Ethics), Philosophy 3 (Introduction to Philosophy), Psychology I
(Introductory Psychology), Sociology 1 (Introduction to the Study of Society).
A good understanding of general history is also required.

2. As prerequisite to acceptance as a candidate for degree of D.B. and Ph.D.
eighteen majors of theological study must have been completed, three of which
shall have been in the Department of Systematic Theology.

3. The three prescribed courses in Systematic Theology are: (1) Systematic
Theology I, (2) Systematic Theology II, (3) Systematic Theology III. These
courses are so arranged as to give the student a consecutive training in Christian
doctrine.

The sequence courses are 4, 9, 13, 14, 15, 51, 52, 53.

4. In addition to the general regulations the candidate for the degree of
Ph.D. must meet the following prerequisites: (a) A general knowledge of the
history of philosophy; (h) a general acquaintance with the history and the
psychology of religion.

The degree will be granted only to those who, in addition to Systematic
Theology 1, 2, and 3, have taken such courses as may be prescribed by the Depart-
ment of Systematic Theology. The precise number of majors cannot be stated
in advance, but it must be at least twelve such majors. The degree is granted
to those who give evidence of high scholarly attainments and abihty to conduct
independent theological research.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

PBBSCBIBBD COUB8BS

(For particulars as to these courses see the fuU list below)

1. Systematic Theology I.— Mj. Summer, 1916, 1917; Autumn, 1916, 1917.

2. Systematic Theology 11.— Mj. Winter, 1917, 1918.
8. Systematic Theology m.— Mj. Spring, 1917, 1918.

I. mSTOBICAL THEOLOQT

QBOUP X. GBNBBAL

4. Outline of the History of Doctrine. — Mj. Spring, 1918, Professob
Mathews.

5. Outline Course in Comparative Theology. — Mj. Winter, 1917, Professob
Mathews.

85. Comparative Christian Beliefs of Today. — Mj. Professob Beckwith.

6. Types of Contemporary Theology. — Mj. Autunm, 1918, Professor
Smith.



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THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 311

QBOUP 11. 8PBCIAL

10. Christian Origins: The Formative Concepts of Christian Theology. — I.
M. Professor Mathews.

11. Christian Origins: The Formative Concepts of Christian Theology. — II.
M. Professor Mathews.

18. The History of Dogma L— The Patristic Period. Mj. Autumn, 1916,

1918, Professor Mathews.

14. The History of Dogma XL— The Scholastic Period. Mj. Winter, 1917,

1919, Professor Mathews.

15. The History of Dogma HL — ^The Reformation and Modem Period.
Mj. Spring, 1917, 1919, Professor Mathews.

SIS. History of Christian Doctrine I. — ^The Patristic Period. Mj. Autumn,

1917, Professor Bbckwith.

S14. History of Christian Doctrine XL— The Scholastic Period. Mj.
Winter, 1918, Professor Beckwith.

815. History of Christian Doctrine HL — The Reformation and Modem
Period. Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Bbckwith.

816. The Theology of Schleiermacher. — Mj. Autimm, 1916, Professor
Bbckwith (Chicago Theological Seminary).

817. History of American Theology. — Mj. Winter, 1917, Professor
Bbckwith.

20. The History of the Idea of God.— M. Simmier, 1916, 1918, Second Term,
Professor Mathews.

26. The History of the Doctrine of Salvation. — Mj. Professor Mathews.

n. constructive theologt

OBOUP X. QENBBAL

1. Systematic Theology I. — Mj. Summer, 1916, 1917, Professors Mathews
AND Sbath; Autumn, 1916, Professor Smith; Autumn, 1917, Professor
Mathews.

2. Systematic Theology H. — Mj. Winter, 1917, Professor Smith; Winter,

1918, Professor Mathews.

3. Systematic Theology HI. — Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Mathews;
Spring, 1918, Professor Smith.

Courses Sl, S2, and S3, given by Professor Bbckwith, in the Chicago
Theological Senunary, are equivalents of these courses.

QBOUP XI. BPBCIAL

30. Theological Encyclopedia and Methodology. — Mj. Autumn, 1917, Pro-
fessor Smith.

33. The Christian View of Man and Sin. — M. Summer, Second Term, 1917,
Professor Smith.

34. The Person and Work of Christ. — Mj. Professor Smith.

35. The Christian Doctrine of Salvation. — M. Professor Smith.

37. The Doctrine of the Kingdom of God. — M. Summer, 1917, First Term,
Professor Mathews.

38. The Social Aspect of Christian Doctrine. — ^Mj. Winter, 1918, Professor
Mathews.

in. christian ethics

QBOUP Z. GBNBBAL

8. Christian Ethics. — M. Summer, 1916, 1918, Second Term, Professor
Smith.

OBOUP II. BPBCIAL

41. History of Christian Ethics.— Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Smith.



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312 THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

IV. APOLOGETICS

GBOUP I. GIMBBAL

9. Outline Course in Apologetics. — Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Smith.
89. Apologetics: The Chief Problems and Types of the Defenses of Chris-



9. Apol
r.— Mj.



tianity. — Mj. Professor Beckwith.

GBOUP U. BPBCIAL

89. The Christian Doctrine of a Future Life.—- M. First Term, Summer,
1917, Professor Youtz (Auburn Theological Seminary).

61. Christian Doctrine in Relation to Modem Science. — Mj. Autumn,

1917, 1919, Professor Smith.

62. Christian Doctrine in Relation to Modem Philosophical Ideals. — Mj.
Winter, 1918, 1919, Professor Smfth.

62A. Christian Doctrine in Relation to Modem Thought — M. First Term,
Summer, 1917, Professer Youtz (Auburn Theological Seminary).

862. The Christian Ideal as Related to the Ideals of Philosophical Ethics.—
Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Beckwith.

63. Christian Ethics in Relation to Modem Social and Ethical Movements.
— Mj. Spring, 1918, 1919, Professor Smith.

y. SEMINARS

61A. The Blstory of the Doctrine of Immortality. — Mj. Autumn, 1917,
Professor Mathews.

62C. The Doctrine of Assurance in Protestant Theology. — Mj. Winter,

1918, Professor Smith.

62D. The Doctrine of the Trinity. — Mj. Autumn, 1916, Professor
Mathews.

62E. The History of the Doctrine of the Atonement — Mj. Spring, 1918,
Professor Mathews.

'BSA. The Use of Scripture in Modem Theology. — Mj. Winter, 1917, Pro-
fessor Smith.

63C. The Problem of the Supernatural. — Mj. Winter, 1916, Professor
Smith.

66. Fundamental Problems in Modem Theology. — ^Research for advanced
students. Mj. Professor Smith.

COURSES GIVEN IN THE DIVnnTT HOUSES

THB DIBCIPLBS' DIVINITY HOUBS

2. The Development of Thought among the Disciples. — Mj. Spring, 1917,
Winter, 1918, Assistant Professor Sharpb.

6. Problems of Doctrinal Restatement. — Mj. Summer, 1917, Assistant
Professor Sharpe.

THB BTDBB (uNIVBHSAUST) DIVINITT HOUBB

1. History of Doctrine among the Universalists. — Mj. Winter and Spring,
1916-17.

4. The Liberal Movement in Modem Theology. — Mj. Autumn, Winter, and
Spring, 1916-17.

COGNATE COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Note. — Othor departments are indicated by giving the name of the department
before the number of the course.

Philosophy 6. Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century. —
Mj. Summer, 1916, Professors Tufts and Mead; Spring, Assistant Pro-
fessor Ames.



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THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 313

Philosophy 40. Evolution of Morality. — Mj. Autumn, 1916, Professor

TtJFTS.

Philosophy 61. Metaphysics of Religion. — Mj. Assistant Professor Ames.

Philosophy 62. Psychology of Religious Groups. — M. Assistant Professor
Ames.

Sociology 18. The Ethics of Sociology. — Mj. Professor Small.

Comparatiye Religion 1. Outline History of Religions. — Mj. Professor
Foster.

Comparatiye Religion 4. Religion of Primitiye Peoples. — Mj. Professor
Foster.

Comparatiye Religion 8. Epistemology of Religion. — ^The Knowledge Prob-
lem. Mj. Spring, 1917, Professor Foster.

Comparatiye Religion 9. Metaphysics of Religion. — Mj. Professor Foster.

Comparative Religion 13. Philosophy of Religion from Kant to HegeL —
Mj. Professor Foster.



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHURCH HISTORY

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION
Andrew Cunningham McLauqhlin, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Professor of History

and Head of the Department of Church History.
Shirlbt Jackson Case, D.B., Ph.D., D.D., Professor of Early Church History

and New Testament Interpretation.
Alonzo Ketcham Parker, D.D., Professorial Lecturer Emeritus on Modem

Missions.
John Wildman Moncribf, A.M., D.D., Associate Professor of Church ffistory.
Errett Gates, Ph.D., Instructor in Church History; Assistant Professor of

Church History in the Disciples' Divinity House.
Peter George Mode, A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Church History.
William Edward Dodd, Ph.D., Professor of American History.
James Westfall Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of European ffistory.

Francis Albert Christie, A.B., D.D., Professor of Church History, Meadville

Theological School (Summer, 1917).
Hbnrt Hammerslet Walker, Ph.D., Sweetzer and Michigan Professor of

Ecclesiastical History, Chicago Theological Seminary.

INTRODUCTORY
1. Genercd plan of the program. — ^The program in Church History includes
four classes of courses: Fir at, four courses which are intended to be introductory
to more advanced work and also to give a general view of the field; while the
whole subject is covered in a very general way, those periods are emphasized
which are of special interest and importance for the student preparing for active
work in the ministry, that is, periods which, because they were creative or transi-
tional, are of most value for an understanding of the development of the church.
Second, special courses covering more limited chronological fields or devoted to the
study of particular movements or to particular countries; these courses are
intended for the students taking special interest in Church History and desiring
fuller information than is offered by the introductory courses; they are also



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314 THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

designed for those definitely specializing in the subject. Third, more special and
more advanced courses, in which there is distinct effort to prepare students for
scholarly work and research. Fourth, courses in missions and the whole history
of the expansion of Christianity.

2. Requirements for degrees. — (a) The candidate is subject to the general
regulations of the Divinity School respecting degrees.

b) Before being accepted as a candidate for any degree the student must
have completed twelve majors of theological study, four of which must have
been taken in Church History. Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 are prescribed.

Any course offered by the Department may be taken as a sequence course
except 1, 2, 3, and 4.

c) The general requirements for the Bachelor's, the Master's, and the
Doctor's degree in Church History are stated on pp. 305-07.

d) For the Master's degree with Church History as the principal subject,
and for the Doctor's degree with Church History as the secondary subject, the
candidate must be familiar with the most significant movements in the entire
history of the church, and he will be so examined as to test his knowledge of these
main events and his grasp of the more special periods treated in the courses which
he has selected under the advice of the Department.

e) For the Doctor's degree with Church History as principal subject the
candidate must be familiar with the general field of Church History, but the stress
of the examination will be laid on the period in which he has written his thesis.
He will be expected to have fuller knowledge of the whole field than would qualify
him for the Master's degree and must in addition be prepared for a searching
examination in one general division of the whole subject. The degree will be
given, not on the basis of a certain number of majors completed, but in recognition
of the candidate's high attainments and ability in his chosen province.

3. Church History and History, — Church History b a special field of history
of great general interest and of peculiar professional significance to theological
students. But the field of history is a wide one, and therefore students making
a special study of Church History will often find it helpful to choose courses in the
Departments of Arts, Literature, and Science, and especially certain coiurses
in the Graduate Schools. These courses, while not strictly limited to the field of
Church History, give information and training of marked value to the specialist
in Church History. The relations between the Departments of general History
and of Church History are such that, under proper restriction, students doing
work in Church History may be allowed to carry such courses in the general
History department as appear to be suited to their special needs.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

PBEBCRIBED COURSES
(For particulars as to these courses see the full list below)

A. IN THB DIVINITY SCHOOL

1. Beginnings of Christianity.— Autumn, 1917, 1918.

2. The Ancient Catholic Church,— Summer, 1917; Winter, 1918.

3. The Period of the Reformation. — Spring, 1918.

4. The Development of Modem Qiristianity.— Spring, Autumn, 1917;
Autumn, 1918.



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THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 315

B. IN THB OHICAOO THBOLOOICAL BBlflNABT

51. History of the Church from the Close of the Apostolic Age to Rise of
the Papacy. — Autumn, 1917.

52. The Period of the Reformation from the Rise of Humanism to That of
the Enlightenment, 1300-1687.— Spring, 1918.

S9. The Church from the Rise of the Papacy to Humanism.— Winter, 1918.

I. GENERAL mTBODUCTION (100-1900 A.D.)

1. Beginnings of Christianity. — Mj. Autumn, 1917, 1918, Summer, 1918,



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