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3, 1962.

Sigma Theta Tau. Inc. is a professional society whose purposes are to promote high pro-
fessional and individual development and to advance the profession of nursing. Its members
are honored for their superior scholarship, qualities of leadership, and capacity for personal
growth. Not more than twenty percent of each class may be selected for membership after
completion of one-half of the required curriculum.

OFFICERS

President BEVERLY FUSSELL

President-Elect BETTY ANN DORMAN

Vice President MARY BOWSHER

Recording Secretary ELIZABETH MOORE

Corrcspondina Secretary LUCY FORT

Treasurer . . ! PAULA KIRBY

Archivist MARIE CLONEY

Counselor MARGARET MOORE

NANCY GILLILAND

SENIOR STUDENT MEMBERS GRADUATE STUDENTS

Allen, Ilenc Kay Marie Phillips Cloney

Allen, Jean Georgia Lewis

Amend, Nancy Barr Lyn Ogburn

Bates, Elizabeth W. Faye Pickard

Beattie. Elizabeth Frances Ross

Bowsher, Mary M. Jan Thomas

Browning, Oddie B. Jan Towers

Cline, Toni Elizabeth Carolyn Williams

Ehelf,"carolyn Anne FACULTY MEMBERS

Moore, Elizabeth Barnes_Ruby Norman

Cross. Elsie Deana
JUNIOR STUDENT MEMBERS Day's- Martha Clyde

Barber, Susan Lee D°'an Margaret

Beck. Connie Fort- Lucy T.

Hamlin, Linda ^"n'f"-?ty"'y

Oldham, Betty 9 I't? ' ^"""u^

Partin Lois Goldblatt. Kathleen

Ricknian, Sandra Tilley Hargett. Virginia

Slaughter, Marie H^"'/, Ruth

Taylor, Carolyn Hocffner Emma

Hudson, Lmda
Kemble, Elizabeth
NURSES IN BACHELORS PROGRAM Lister, Doris

Ward, Linda Carol Moore, Margaret'

Allen. Prentiss Anne ^■. West, Betty Barbrey

.^
-EG






The Valkyries



OFFICERS

MARY GRAY TEAGUE President

MARY SUSAN KIRK Vice-President

ANNE MARIE PEACOCK Secretary

SUSAN GERTRUDE GRETZ Treasurer






MEMBERS 1966-1967

Margaret Susan Barron
Mary Margaret Bowsher
Toni Elizabeth Cline
Carol Ann Shaffer Consolvo
Nancy Elizabeth Ehle
Susan Gertrude Gretz
Judith Anne Ha
Carolyn Rudolph Hopper
Mary Elizabeth Justice
Mary Susan Kirk
Anne Birch Lipford
Anne Marie Peacock
Betsey Jean Price
Mary Gray Teague
Florence Elder Witt





ALUMNAE AND HONORARIES

Ellen BeaUie Allen
Myrtle Kathleen Cauble
Diana Gayle Foote
Alice Kellog Gann
Martha Zink Gibson
Madeline Dell Gray
Sue Stanley Guerry
Linda ^'\onne Harrison
Mary Elizabeth Haverstock
Miriam Rose Lane
Elizabeth Louise Menefee
Helen Leith Merrow
Eunice Howze Milton
Jerri T. Moser
Sharon Marie O'Donnell
Grevlin Talcott Reeves
Elizabeth Penfield Scovil
Elizabeth Anderson Taylor
Sylvia Anne Wall
Camilla Hays Walters
David Kathryn Wilborne
Joan Dee Woodvvorth
Mrs. June Allcott
Mrs. Mabel Brittain
Mrs Robert O. Forrest
Mrs. Graham Ramsev



Phi Eta Sigma



OFFICERS:

MICHAEL DAVID ZIMMERMAN President

THOMAS BAISDEN HEYS. JR Vice President

CHARLES MYRON BENNER Secretary

JOHN TROY SCOTT Treasurer

STANLEY DARYL DAVIS Historian

DAVID T. LAPKIN Faculty Advisor



INITIATED MARCH 30. 1966



FRESHMEN:

rhom:i> Meckel Allen
Hugh Gaylord Barclay
David Leroy Barnes
James Harutun Balmasian
Charles Myron Benner
John Bovce Bcnncll, Jr.
David I cc Bowman
Thomas Brooks Boykm
Harold Sloven Broughton
Robert Hoyl Butler
Thomas Bernard Cannon
Phillip Branch Chappell
John Leonard Cobh
William Booth Cocke, Jr.
Gary Dean Cornwell
William Francis Conway
William Christopher Daiand
Stanley Daryl Davis
Amos Council Dawson. HI
Kenneth Coyner Day
Norvin Kennedy Dickeison
Martin Joseph Eaton
Leroy Titus Elliott, Jr,
James Gray Fennell, III
Terence Nash Furness
Alexander Scott Goodfellow
Fred Thurman Hamlet
Jimmie Alex Haynes
Dwight Charles Hedgepeth
Thomas Baisden Hays, Jr.
Paul Alfred Holyfield
Thomas Hartwell Howard
Frank Parker Hudson. Jr.
Robert Arnold Isley
Gilbert Horman Jackson
Ronald Wayne Joyner
Michael David Katz
Thomas Hale Leech




Howard Glenn Miller
Thomas Lynch Murphy. Jr.
James Wilbert Newlin
Robert Bruce Ochsman
Alan Morris Patterson
Bruce Taylor Roberts
John Lawrence Rouse, III
John Lester Sarratt
Warren Hal Schonfield
Richard Joseph Schroer
John Troy Scott
Frank Brown Sloop, Jr.
Michael Tesh Southern
Elliott Mark Stern
Alan Robert Swendiman
Morris Milchcll Waldrop
James Willis Walter. Jr.
Wilbur Edward Webster
David Svdnor Wells
Donald Murrell Whaley
Benjamin Taylor White
Michael David Zimmerman

SOPHOMORES:

Ronald S. Barden
John Kendrick Burns
Robert Earl Dornbush
Samuel E. Ewell
John M. Gilkey. Jr.
Jon Dar\l Hodgin
James .Allen Hurdle
Solomon Samuel Klioze
John Henry Koch
Richard Alexander Urquhart
Tracie Linwood Varnum
David Gray Westmoreland

GRADUATE STUDENT:

Maxwell Reed Mowry




'^^^^LOtJ)^




:»^f^M«s/'^




OFFICERS

WILLIAM HAROLD ROBINSON Praeceps

DWIGHT E THOMAS. JR Vice Praeceps

CHARLES FREEMAN LONGING. JR Notarius

WORTH TIMOTHY HAITHCOCK Quaestor



PRAETORS— SPRING 1966

Phillip Augustine Baddour. Jr.
Duane Gary Boggs
James Clark Brewer
Lew G. Brown
Jerry Wayne Cannady
Donald Wayne Carson
Dudley C. Chandler. Jr.
Issac Alan Craig
Paul Dickson. Ill
William T. Elliott. Jr.
John Edward Ellis
Terry Clayton Fo.x
Adolphus Drewry Frazier, Jr.
James Roy Fullwood
William Arthur Hays
James Gaston Hough
Samuel Pancoast Hunt. II
Robert Carl Hunter
Kenneth Byron McCoy
Charles R. 'Miller
Albert Parrish Pepper
Paul Gregory Russell
Ernest Allen Shepard
William Samuel Woodard



CHARTER MEMBERS

Wesley Neil Bass
Robert Wilson Carter
Charles Dunn
Edward N. Halford
William E. Hauser
Thomas N. Walters

HONORARY MEMBERS

William Brantley Aycock
Arthur James Beaumont
John S. Bennett
James O. Cansler
Cornelius O. Cathey
Donald Atlas Furtado
Charles Henderson. Jr.
Robert White Linker
William Graves Long
James Parker
Walter Rabb
Paul F. Sharp
Fred W. Schroeder, Jr.
Harry E. Smith
Paul Sturdivant
James C. Wadsworth
Frederick Henry Weaver
James C. Wallace





Gamma Beta Phi



•y/3.^ on this campus is a young orga-
nization. It is an honor and a service
society formed to aid the university, its
students, and tiie community. Member-
ship is open to men and women stu-
dents who have above a 2.5 quality
point average with preferably no course
flunked. This year in the work of the
membership will continue the ideals of
yfiip — scholarship, citizenship, and
service.

OFFICERS

JAMES E. SEYMOUR, JR. . . .President

JIM BATMASIAN Vice-President

ELIZABETH REDDING PUGH

Secretary
JANE LEACH Treasurer



MEMBERS



Dorothy Ciirolyn Allen
Donald George Arnold
Jack R. Baker
Jim Batmasian
Jean Marie Blair
Thomas Brooks Boykin
John Kendrick Burns, Jr.
John Mclvin Cahoon
Gary Alan Cheers
R. Nelson Cochran
Richard Cooke
Betty Dare Funderburk
Charleen Funderburk
Betty Jo Gray
James David Garrison
Fred Taurmon Hamlet
Martha Gail Hutchison
George Hutton
Rugh Kacmmerlen
Brian Michael Laddey
Donald T. Lassiter
Charles Carson Lewis
Walter G. Lineberger
Johnny Paul Long
John Robert Ludington, Jr.
Kenneth Nolan May, Jr.
Charles Russell Morgan



Barbara Ann Nagy
Richard Allen Pate
Elizabeth Redding Pugh
Johnny Roy Ratliff
Richard David Sanderson
Ellon Grace Seavvell
James E. Seymour. Jr.
Edwin Douglas Smith
William Samuel Tate
Benjamin Loyall Taylor. Jr.
Edward Earl Taylor
Johnny Martin Thomas, HI
Douglas C. Telt
Peter James Underbill
Dwight William Wait, III
Luther G. White
Ralph Walter Wilkcrson
William Kenneth Wilkinson
Richard Paris Wilson
Robert Bruce Coleman
Susan Kendy Johnson
Harry Prager Parerson
Robert Edward McGaw, Jr.
Randal Stanley
Junius G. Adams
Larry Annas
Jane Leach



S.N.E.A.

The Student National Education
Association is the professional or-
ganization for college and univer-
sity students preparing to teach.
The function of S.N.E.A. is to pro-
vide opportunities for professional
growth; development of leadership;



understanding of the history ethics,
and programs at state and national
levels; and participation in profes-
sional activities at local, state, and
national levels, especially integrat-
ing programs of local associations
and student education associations.
The Carolina chapter is the Frank
Porter Graham Chapter of



S.N.E.A. and is affiliated with the
North Carolina Education Associa-
tion and the National Education
Association. The officers are (seat-
ed in picture) Linda Lauder, Presi-
dent, Mayada Kiser, Vice-Presi-
dent, Stella Alexander, Secretary,
Peggy Morgan, Treasurer, Judy
Sutton, Publicity Chairman.




SENIORS



^FTE^T^^



m mm




at Carolina, the Student reaches the optimum of his col-
lege career — he is a Senior. After this last obstacle comes
the rich reward of graduation. The Yack is primarily a
Senior's book, for it is his last remembrance of UNC. And
part of that memory is the outstanding faculty that has
helped lead them through the University.



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS



LEFT TO RIGHT:

Alice Deenier. Secre-
tary; Martha Menefee,
Social Chairman; Jodj
Wright, Treasurer.



LEFT TO RIGHT:

Nelson Schwab, Vice
President; Jim Brame,
President.




BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION




As a past student at Carolina who deserted to join the enemy (i.e.,
the faculty). Isaac Reynolds, Professor of Accounting, is in. perhaps, a
rather unique position to pass judgment on both the UNC student,
the UNC professor, and the relationship between the two. On the stu-
dent and student life, he stales: "Since I am a recent Carolina student,"
I know that most of them are hard-working, dedicated individuals and
proud of their school. The beatnik is a typical — not representative of
the 'true' Carolina gentleman." As to the professor's role in the stu-
dent's life. Dr. Reynolds feels that his "role is to do the best to be a
good teacher — this means to publish articles and books as well as to
do a good job 'in the classroom. Other than this main job, his role
is to be a good citizen of the University, town, and state, and to do
those things which a good citizen should do.'; Furthermore, "the faculty
members of the University should make themselves accessible to groups
outside the University — to show a willingness to serve; thus, there
would be less hostility from outsiders. The outsider would see that the
Carolina faculty (and students) are only human and groping for an
understanding of life."



Dr. Clifton H. Kreps holds the unique distinction of being Wachovia
Professor of Banking in the School of Business. His background cer-
tainly justifies this honor, having received his Ph.D. from Duke and
served for si.x years as monetary economist and chief statistician for
the Federal Reserve Bank of New York before coming to North
Carolina. With experience in both the academic and the non-academic
worlds, Dr. Kreps is perhaps more competent than most to comment
on the relationship between the two: "The academic world is very
relevant, I thmk, to the everyday loutside) world in that students carry
into it viewpoints and intellectual skills acquired in school. The every-
day world is very relevant to the academic, of course, a fact we do not
want to lose sight of." Professor Kreps himself takes an interest in
contemporary questions, particularly those which affect his field; "1
think 1 can be said to be interested in current issues of all sorts, but
especially those bearing on the condition of the economy — the finan-
cial aspects of which I try to keep continuously under review."



Clifton H. Kreps, Jr.




Richard P. Calhoon



The professor in a professional school is perhaps closer than any
other to the conflict between the academic world and that of "real
lite." Does the one have any meaning or message for the other, or are
the two mutually exclusive. Rollie Tillman, Professor of Marketing,
sees two sides to the issue; "In one sense the whole of the academic
world is supremely relevant to the outside, everyday world' because
the goal of the one — to bring successive generations of students to a
fuller awareness, deeper personal values, and clearer understanding and
to higher levels of competence in diagnosing, evaluating, and reaching
independent judgment about the universe, culture, and society — that
goal finds its fruition in the outside world as educated generations of
men and women seek solutions to the problems of their world. In yet
another sense, however, the outside world is wholly irrelevant to the
academic world because the university is uniquely positioned as an
institution dedicated to the search for truth in its many dimensions.
Thus it stands apart, unfettered by the values, myths, mores, and
conventional wisdoms of the everyday world, subjecting these to
ceaseless examination and appraisal."



One of the perennial problems faced by schools of business ad-
ministration is the negative attitude held by many businesses and
businessmen toward their BBA and MBA graduates. "They expect to
he vice-presidents immediately," and "All they know comes out of a
book," are complaints frequently heard. Dr. Richard P. Calhoon,
Professor of Personnel Administration in the School of Business, has
quite different ideas on the value of academic business training to the
future industrialist or financier: "The academic world prepares students
in rather odd ways for the 'world of work' in helping them develop
self-reliance, some discipline, and a habit of learning. In other ways,
campus life aids many students in realizing the importance of ac-
commodating to a wide variety of people — including instructors." At
the same time, however. Dr. Calhoon agrees with the critics, in that
he feels "even students of business administration are left with too
little appreciation of the expectations of 'organizational behavior,'
especially ambiguities on the one hand and standards on the other."
It is in this type of preparation that "on-the-job training" supplements
academic knowledge, however; both are necessary — they are not
opposed.



4




Rollie Tillman



The position of an administrator at a university is always a difficult
one, particularly for faculty members who take on administrative
tasks. Many feel that work in the "bureaucracy" interferes with research
and with close faculty-student relationships, while others simply do
not want the problems that would come with additional work. Not so
with Professor Claude S. George, Associate Dean of the School of
Business Administration; "My role in general university life is half
academic in nature, and half administrative in nature. Both provide
satisfaction." Furthermore, he enjoys the aspects of his work which
bring him into contact with students: "I have a tremendous respect for
and confidence in the typical Carolina student. In my opinion, he
shows great promise for the future. I find that working with students
provides me with a great challenge as well as a source of real sat-
isfaction. I wouldn't swap it for any other career." Indeed, Dr. George
has always devoted much of his spare time to students, and is cur-
rently serving as faculty advisor (corresponding secretary) for Phi
Beta Kappa.




Claude S. George




FB*; Donnitory OfTl-




ARMSTRONG. JR.
CLAUDIE
ANDREW

Wilmingtor



BAKER. JAMES
MARION

Rocky Mount
B S. in Business Ad-
ministration: Onenta-
tion Councilor




EARNHARDT.
ROBERT
SWIFT

Davidson
BS in Business Ad-
ministration. Arnold
Air Society. Scabbard
and Bbdc; AFROTC


BECK. TONY
LOHR

Lexington
B,S in Business Ad-


Ik


BENKO. PETER A
EastGreenbush.
Nesv York
B.S in Business Ad-














BOULWARE.
GEORGE
WALTER

Charlotte


/^


BOWEN. CHARLIE
HEWITT

Wilmington
Sin. B S. in Busi-


B S in Business




aSl


YMCA


BRAXTON, JR..
ALFRED

FINLEY

Graham
BS. m Accounting.
University Pany


m


BRAY.

DOUGLAS H

Summerfield
B S. in Business ,M-



^ir:^



BRYSON.III
WILLIAM
HOLMES



BUIE.JOHN
HARRELL

Dillon. S.C.
B S in Business Ad-



BYRD. SAMUEL
MARTIN

Lillington
S. in Business Ad-



CARR.

TIMOTHY D

Westfield.

B S in Business





m: MRC;
Officer;
rsily Party.



Thomasvillc
B.S. In Business Ad-


,1^ t^

- *


DOUGLAS

Gibsonville
B.S in Business Ad-


HOFFMAN.E-
NORMAN

New York. NY.
B.S- m Business Ad-
minjslralion; *KI
Baseball. YMCA




HOFMEISTER,

STANLEY

IRVING

Raleigh
B S. in Accounting.
X*. Sludent Govern-
ment Committee; Stu-
dent Pany. YMCA.




LONGEST, JR.
FRANK
ALEXANDER




EDUCATION




Associate Professor of Education Annie Lee Jones has spent nine
years on the faculty of the School of Education, working with both
graduates and undergraduates. Her chief responsibility with the latter
has been teaching and advising juniors and seniors in elementary edu-
cation — most of whom are women. Her particular task is senior
methods courses and supervising practice teaching. In the educating of
future educators she attempts to get to know each student personally
as soon as possible, and to be available for individual conferences to
discuss problems and offer words of encouragement. In her own courses,
students help to plan and to evaluate; assignments vary to some degree
and ^choice of assignments is permitted. Student participation is en-
couraged in class discussions, reporting on the literature and research
findings, and in planning, demonstrating, and evaluating methods and
materials of instruction. Dr. lones feels most strongly that "there must
he a high degree of relevance between life on and off the campus. This
gives meaning and purpose to the student (and the instructor) in
academe and provides opportunity for the people in the world outside
to tap the resources of the University. Living in a narrow campus
world would limit dramatically the growth and development of stu-
dents (and faculty) as well as the opportunity for the University to
serve the stale, the region, and the nation."



"In the field of education we stress that our academic program
should reflect and he based upon the everyday world." Thus says Dr.
Donald G. Tarbet. Professor of Education, in commenting on the
relevance of the academic world to the everday world for future
educators. He states further. "Scholarship is stressed in order that the
future teacher will know the area of his specialization. New methods
and materials of instruction, including the latest developments in the
field of instructional technology, are emphasized in order that the
teacher may be an effective agent in the total learning situation of boys
and girls." As to the role of the professor in this academic preparation,
Professor Tarhet feels "that a professor has the responsibility of pro-
viding the best learning situation possible for the students in his
classes. As an advisor he must assist the student in making career
choices and vet realize that the student must make the final decision
with regard to his future." By fulfilling this responsibility well, the
professor discharges his duties to the student, to the University, to
the stale, and to the nation.



One of the problems of the instructor in the professional schools
at the University of North Carolina is a general isolation from most
of the students and from the mainstream of campus life as a whole.
To this unhappy rule. Dr. R. Sterling Hennis, Associate Professor in
the School of Education, is a welcome exception. His own feelings on
this matter arc that every member of the University community has
a responsibility lo Ihal community: "In addition to regular duties and
assignment i in mv own particular school, I feel a responsibility to the
total university. Interdepartmental committee work and planning by
the facullv are important for the most meaningful educational ex-
perience for the student. Student activities and organizations, I believe,
are extremely valuable and should have the support and encourage-
ment of the faculty and administration. As a fraternity advisor I have
the opportunity of working with students outside the pure academic
area. In so doing I feel that I am able to understand more clearly many
of the current problems related to campus life."



R. Slerling Hennis





Mary Turner Lane




Should the educator take any interest in worldly af-
fairs, or take a stand on contemporary controversies? It
is too often and there are too many who say no. Dr.
Zone E. Eargle, Associate Professor of Education and
Associate Dean of the School of Education, disagrees
with this point of view: "As a former public school
teacher and administrator, I am very interested in the
question of civil liberties as it relates to public education
in North Carolina. The whole question of deseeregation
and its effects upon education is a topic of vital concern
to those involved in public schools. There are no ready
made solutions to the problems involved, however." Dr.
Eargle goes on to say that "much of the unrest among
students on college and university campuses across the
coimtfy today is related to the fact that many do not
see the relevance between academic experience and the
world outside. But education must be relevant if it is to
be meaningful both for the student and the world outside
the university community."



Associate Professor of Education Marj Turner Lane

feels intensely the Education instructor's role "in the
studeijt's academic career is in the School of Education
where' she (sometimes he) is introduced to children and
to reaching. Today there is a great emphasis on the
importance of the early years of schooling in determining
a child's attitude about himself, about learning, and about
the world in which he lives so we have a growing need
for good teachers of young children. The student must
understand the nature and character of American schools,
the purpose of education in a democratic society, the
needs of children, and the ways in which the needs of
society and children can be met. The professor works
with the student on the campus and in the public schools
during student teaching." Dr. Lane believes further that
one of the main purposes of an undergraduate cur-
riculum in Educatio'n is to awaken the future teacher to
all the social realities of the world today.



A frequent complaint voiced by many students through-
out their educational career is the total irrelevance of
their academic preparation to their work in later years.
Dr. Carl F. Brown, Professor of Elementary Education,
is outspoken in denying that there is no connection:
"Many seem to fiml it difficult to see a relationship be-
tween course work taken at UNC and the economic op-
portunities available after graduation. Academic work
which helps one to acquire the necessary skills for study
and exploration, and to broaden his interests and desires
for learning does bear a close relationship with the world
outside academe." Professor Brown believes further that
the University of North Carolina possesses an excellent
atmosphere in which to receive such training: "It is hard
to think of a better place for a young person to spend
his "growing up years" than in the environment which
Carolina offers. The Carolina student represents a se-
lected segment of American youth and Carolina provides
a liberal, generous, and challenging environment in
which he can gain maturity and find purpose for himself."









ABIJRCROMBIE,
JR .DANllft.
PUTNAM

Djnen.Conn

A,B- in Englisli Edu



jncilor;Panhellenic
jncil. SNEA, Uni-
^lly Party. YWCA



\LEXANDER.
STELLA
W,\TKINS

Charlotle



ARCHER. JOAN
CAROL

Chapel Hill
^.B in Elementary
Education, KKI'Xaro-
lina Forum. Curotina
Handhaok. Student



AUSTELL. JESLYN
McCALL

Concord
A B. in Education.



HXtjBI , Bt


1 11


111 MPHI


I


1


cxuiglon




1 Suidies


tJULalion.O




Councilor:


Student


Government


Commit-


lee. Sluden


Part y:


YWCA.





lANDY.
MARGARET
ELIZABETH



Carl F. Brown




DcMHNT. CAROL

ANITA

A B in KIcmenlary
lducjlion:VW('A,




DeMERITT,
JANEC.

Chapel Hill



FAOAN.
CARROLL
ELIZABETH





dr^




FULCHER.

ROBERT

GREGORY

Mayodan
A.B. in English Edu-
cation. A*(l



GOSSETT,

LYNDA CAROL

Durham

A.B. in English Edu-





OREENE. PAULA

MANN

Chapel Hil



HARGIS.SARA
ANN

Chapel Hill




FARRIS.JEAN



FEELEY. MARTHA


/%


CAROL


H^ '^H


Washinglon


S^ '*m


A B. in Secondary Ed-


W X - V


ucalion Social Studies;
YWCAtTuloriall.


J^:k


FLOYD. MAURICE


A


ANTHONY




Rocky Mount


w^^ -» *


A.B in English Edu-










y




l'





GRADY.
ELIZABETH
COWAN



*M. Student



GRIFFIN.
MARTHA
EVANS



HARRIS.
CYNTHIA
BARRINGTON





FATATA. JAMES



FLEMING. JUDY
CATHERINE

Durham



FOREMAN.
LORETTAFAYE
Washington
A.B. la English Edu-



FUNDERBURK.
BETTY DARE



Online LibraryUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillYackety yack [serial] (Volume 1967) → online text (page 20 of 31)