University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Aberdeen
A.B. in English Edu-



FLENNIKEN.
CAROL C,

Charlotte



FREEMAN.
MICHAEL
NORRIS



TeJChers ol America.
Opera Workshop; Stu-
dent NEA. YMCA.



omm : Orientation
ouncilor, Panhellen-
: Rush Manual: Slu-




A.B. in Spanish Edu-



HARTIS, SANDRA
REA

Winston-Salem
A B in English Edu-




^1



MARGARET

LYNN

Asheville
\.B. in Special Educa-
lon. Carolina Sympo-




FLETCHER,
JUDITH T.

Chapel Hill
A.B. in Elementary
Education; AAIl; At-
torney General Staff;
Campus Chest; Order



sily Party; Women's



FRIEDMAN,
EMANUEL
JOSHUA




GILLEY.

MARLENEANN

Jacksonville

A B in French Educa-



GREENE.JOHNNY
LEE

Forest City
A.B. in English Edu-



HALL.DIANNE


M_- 1


HALL. DONNA


SACRINTY


Hcv :^l


LYNN


Reidsville


Iri '


Fayetteville


A.B. in Social Studies


^ *:


A.B- in English Edu-




HEAD. BARBARA
HANCOCK




♦ M; Sludi-nl
Nt\ Scudenl Parly;




MYERS, MARY
WILLARD

Charlolle
A B in Education;
KKT.




William S. Newman



A realism that comes from being a professor in the department ot
Radio. Television, and Motion Pictures, and an idealism that could
only come from a love affair with Carolina, characterize Dr. William
H. Hardy. He feels that the UNC student should not be categorized,
and that his own role in the student's academic career is to teach, talk,
and listen — whatever good, or bad. may come of that. Furthermore,
he senses very strongly his position as a citizen of the University — to
be concerned and to contribute; it is his belief that academic life should
have total relevance to the non-academic world, "but. alas, it often
has very little." Perhaps if there were more Dr. Hardy's, this would not
be the case.

"The best students at UNC are as good as any in the country and
they profit by the lively climate of learning that does exist here." says
Dr. JoHd M. Schnorrenberg, .Associate Professor of Art History. His
experience certainly qualifies him to speak on the quality of the
Carolina student in comparison with others, having studied at Princeton
and taught at Columbia before coming to North Carolina in 1959.
Professor Schnorrenberg does not seem to be as enthusiastic over the
average student as over the better ones: "The average student is
probably not less able than his counterpart in many other institutions,
but I am not sure that his opportunities for learning are as great as
they are at some other institutions. There is a certain drabness in the
circumstances of his life and a certain routineness to much of his
instruction which do not encourage him to make the effort to think
for himself." It is his feeling, however, that the main task in the
learning process belongs to 'the student, with the implication that if the
student does not think for himself, he has only himself to blame: "The
facts of a subject exist and they must be mastered by the student's
self-disciplined acquisition of them. The libraries and laboratories are
here, and if the faculty gives its best effort to making sure that each
is supplied with all the books and equipment it ought to have, then
the student must find the way and the time to use them."

How does one of the most-published and often-requested guest
lecturers on the faculty feel about his role in the student's academic
career, in University life, and in society in general. William S. Newman,
Professor of Music, is outspoken in his devotion to UNC and the UNC
student: "In my nineteen years the Carolina student has never seemed
so fine as right now. and the same goes for "Carolina life. I hope my
own- role in his career is a major one. and that what he can get from
the faculty is a major reason for his coming to Carolina." Dr. Newman
believes the Music Department in particular has much to offer the
University community: "The general music classes we give for the
layman, the choral and instrumental organizations that are open to
him. the concerts that we offer at little or no cost, should. I believe,
make a substantial university contribution." Professor Newman is
concerned further with the place of the University in the "civilian
world": "1 am interested and try to keep in touch with everything that
affects the University, which includes both the educational goals and
the world scene. The more contact with the outer world the better.
The academic world must keep in touch with the everyday or we've
lost the battle not only for education but for the good life'."





\^J^Jk





K


ARENDALL.NAN


ARTFRTON.


BARNES.ill.


BEASLEY.JR .


BLACKWOOD.






BOONE


JONATHAN


ORVILLE


ROBERT JONES


WILLIAM


\ B in M.jsit


( ,,ji.-


Mobile. Ala,


BELL


KENNETH


Louisburg


SHEPARD


l.naPla>maker


,UNC


A B. in Radio. Tele-


Wastiington. D C


Raleigh


A.B, in Radio. Tele-


Chapel Hill


Madrigal Si


ngers.


vision, and Molion Pic-


A.B-inMusic and Eng-


A,B. in Dramatic .Arts;


vision, and Motion Pic-


A.B in Studio An


UNC Chonis


UNC


ture. Illi*; IBE; Uni-


lish: St. Anthony Hall.


Carolina Playmakers;


lures




Opera Theater




vcfMly Party; YWCA.
WUNC


Men'sOleeClub;Uni-
versity Choojs; IJni-


Fencing.







FINE
ARTS




BLAIR. JR.


BLOOM. WARREN


BUTLER.JEANNE


COATS. HARRY


CREWS.JANE


DAVIS.JAMES


DOBBS, WILLIAM


HARRY


EDWARD


FOLLEY


Chapel Hill


PENFIELD


EDWARD


ARTHUR


LEANDER


Fairfield. Conn


Southern Pines


A.B, in Radio. Tele-


Oak Ridge. Tenn,


Charlotte


.Albemarle


Greensboro


A.B. in Radio. Tele-


A.B in Arf History;


vision and Motion Pic-


BFA, in Art; XH;


A.B in Radio, tele-


A B in Radio. Tele-


A-B in Radio. Tele.


vision, and Motion Pic-


Publications Board.


tures Ki University


Carolina Playmakers;


vision and Motion Pic-


vision, and Motion Pic-


vision, and Motion Pic-


lures. Canterbury




Pany;WUNC-F\L


Fine Arts Festival


tures. University Par-


tures. .|i\U; WUNC;


tures; Carolina Con-


Club; Student Pany;






Planning Committee;


ty; WUNC; WUNC-


WUNC-TV


servative Club; Daily


WUNC.TV.






OnenlalionCouncilor.


TV




Tar Heel. Dormitory








Toronto Exchange.






Officer; Student Par-








University Party.






ly. WUNC.TV;YRC;








YWCAItutonall,






rackety Yark
















^^^^


SWOHHORD.


MHea


WILLIAM


p^^^^


(11 IVl R


r A




r-.f


A H in Radi,., T
iiMi.n.jndMulion


r "■


cil; Student Gov


^^


Tr\"ck; uITi^ers
Party


Lfly^





four hundred fivi




Assistant Professor of English I. Kimball King has had experience
with students on a number of campuses before coming to North Caro-
lina. The UNC student compares favorably with other students in his
opinion, while all modern students have his respect for their industry.
"Carolina students are like students 1 have known at other universities
— Wisconsin, Yale, Johns Hopkins. College students today generally
work harder than my friends and I did ten years ago." Dr. King does
not feel, however, that this increased effort stems entirely from a
greater desire on the part of the students: "This appears to be the
result of increased competition in the professions and the pressures of
the draft. Today's harder-working students do not necessarily have a
greater love of learning or a wider range of interests." He would
welcome some changes in the Carolina student body, which he believes
would improve it significantly: "I would like to see a more heterogen-
eous undergraduate population. A larger quota of well-qualified out-
of-state students would be good for the University's national reputation
and would prepare students more realistically for life in the world
"outside."



Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature Weraer P.
Friederich is one of the most honored and distinguished men On the
UNC faculty. Trained in Switzerland, at the Sorbonne, and at Har-
vard, Dr. Friederich has served as a visiting professor at Duke,
Colorado, Berkley, Bern, and Zurich, and his publications range from
Dante to Australian Literature. With all his cosmopolitan experience,
however, he maintains a deep interest in his adopted state. North
Carolina; he sees his task as mentor and as a member of the University
"to impress upon students the big challenges ahead of them — for
North Carolina is still far below the national average economically and
educationally — and to never compromise with mediocrity and lowering
of standards." Mainly, Professor Friederich would like to contribute
toward making UNC students the elite of the state, if not the nation.



"As a Carolina alumnus 1 find the changes in certain aspects of
student life most striking. The greater intimacy of the good old days
seems gone but perhaps the residential college idea may do something to
bring it back. Generally the caliber of students is impressively improved
with better academic preparation and more serious attitudes." These are
the feelings of Lawrence A. Sharpe, Associate Professor of Romance
Languages on the Carolina student. Though his field of interest —
Portuguese language and literature (particularly Brazilian literature) —
brings him into contact with perhaps too few members of the Univer-
s{t>' communitN', he is very certain of the language professor's position
in that community: "I feel that my function is to stimulate interest in
the culture of other countries and an appreciation for other than
American solutions to general human problems. We .Americans all too
often tend to think that we know all the answers, when very clearly we
do not." This philosophy pervades Dr. Sharpe 's view of current issues:
"The Vietnam War is of course of great concern to all Americans, but
it reflects among other things a certain ineptitude on the part of us
.Americans in dealing with other peoples, a certain inflexibility of
approach, and a lack of understanding of other peoples."



Alumni Distinguished Professor of French Alfred G. Engstrom is a

most unuoual man in many respects. First, of course, there are the
numerous honors and awards Dr. Engstrom has received during his
career, including a baccalaureate degree with honors. Phi Beta Kappa.
the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and
service on several honorary committees and editorial boards. Second,
there is his long association with the University of North Carolina,
having received his AB, MA, and PhD. here, and taught in variotis
capacities since the reception of his Masters degree (1935). There is
also Professor Fngstrom's great interest in relatively unexplored fields
of literature — folklore, the occult, synaesthesia, and unorthodox sym-
bolism (the voices of plants and flowers, the changing cry of the man-
drake, the symbol of the bird in flight, the Tarot cards in Gerard de
Nerval, etc). And finally, there is his devotion to students and teaching,
as demonstrated by the popularity of his Intermediate Survey of French
Literature with undergraduates, and his Nineteenth Century Survey and
Modem Literary Criticism courses with seniors and graduates.



Lawrence A. Sharpe



tout hundrrd ii




HUMANITIES



Dougald MacMillan

Dr. Alfred G. Engstrom (another honored Humanities Pro-
fessor) has many times advanced the query as lo what type of man
specializes in the Eighteenth Century. The answer that seems most
obvious is that it takes a man of Wit to study that period of Wit.
Dr. Dougald MacMillan, Kenan Professor of English, is such a
man, for he ably fits Pope's description: "True Wit is Nature to
advantage dressed. What oft was thought, but ne'er so well ex-
pressed . . ." Professor MacMillan has concentrated his studies in
the prose and poetry of the Restoration and early Classical period,
and in the drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. In
the latter area he has co-edited an excellent volume containing a
representative selection of plays from the period, as well as having
authored nilmerous other publications on both non-dramatic and
dramatic literature. Undergraduates who are able to enroll in Dr.
MacMillan's drama class are fortunate, indeed, for they are work-
ing under a knowledgeable man.




O. B. Hardjson, Jr.

It is not often that the University of North Carolina has one
of its professors gain such popular prestige as being featured in
Time magazine as one of the nation's outstanding professors. Yet.
for O. B. Hardison, Jr., Professor of English, this recognition is
only one of many, having held Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow-
ships, taught at Princeton University, become a full Professor at
UNC in only six years, received the Salgo Award for Under-
graduate Teaching, and chaired the Southeastern Institute of
Medieval and Renaissance Studies. A past student of the University
himself. Dr. Hardison waxes enthusiastic over his current suc-
cessors: "I feel a deep sense of gratitude to this university for the
kind of education and social experience that it provides. It is an'
open, not a closed university, and it combines emphasis on ex-
cellence with the realization that excellence is achieved by different
people in different ways. We value outstanding academic per-
formance, but we do not believe that a student is to be measured
solely by his quality-point average. The active student government
that we have is a vital factor in college life for both students and
faculty. Fortunately, the UNC student government is independent
and highly productive of ideas that benefit the entire community.
The same thing is true of the Daily Tar Heel, which is one of the
best college newspapers in the country, if not the best, and of
such student-faculty enterprises as Graham Memorial. . . . Two
outstanding products of the University atmosphere are the Honor
System . . . and the mature, responsible, attractive quality of most
of the students with whom I come in contact."




BEARD. DAVtD
HASTINGS

Reidsville
A.B. in English.



NL:TH




BERRY. JR .


BLACKWELL.


BLADE. ANNE


BLUMENTHAL.


BORDEAUX,




BRADSHAW.


BROCK.


MEST




HAROLD


CHARLOTTE


SIMPSON


ROBERT LEE


LARRY




DAVIDGERALD


KATHRY




.LI..
York

Ben;


WALTON


GUY


Durham


Greensboro


WINIFRED




Newport News, Va


^


Ne»
English


Tr>on


Charlotte


A.B, in Spanish; >C\ir);


A B. in English


Fayelt


sille


A B in French; .Mik,


A B in Fngli


A.B. In English, \*,


A B in French


Attorney General's




A B in English




ig.^






Carolina Political Un-




Staff; House Council;












ng.




ion. Dormitory OfTi-




University Parly; Se-
















cer; IDC. Men's Hon-




nior Class Publicity
















or Council; Student




Committee. Spanish
















GovemmenI Comm,;




Club; YWCA Foreign
















YMCA.




Student's Committee,














MICHAEL
FARQUHAR
Washington. D.C.
\.B. in French; AKE.



BROWN, II,
NEILSON
Har^inton.Conn
A.B, in English. iKE,



BROWNELL.


BRUENNER.


MARY


DAVID


ELIZABETH


FREDERICK


Biltmore


Sands Point. NY


A B, m Spanish; -\!!;


A,B in English; AKE


Orientation Councilor


Campus Chest (Chair-


IForeign Students!.


man); NROTC


YWCA. Senior Class




Committee (Tutoring)





BUCKINGHAM,
LEWISFARNUM
Flint, Mich.
A.B. in English, HE,
Campus Chest. Uni-
versity Party,



BURLESON,
CAROL J

Asheville
A,B, in French, UNC
Year-al-Lyon,



BUTLER, ROBERT
McMASTER

Alexandna, Va
A,B, in English; W^




AMERON,


CARPENTER, JR,


CATER, ALLEEN


CATHEY,




CHADWICK,


CHESNUTT.III.


CLARK. VELLA


CLINE.JR ,


ELIZABETH


MALCOLM


WILLIAMS


THOMAS




CAROLE


JAMES ALFRED


BETSY


THOMAS RAY


ANN


MOORE


.Anmslon, ,Ma


NATHAN




ANSLEY


Clinton


\aughan


Manon


Raleigh


Lincolnlon


A B in English, KA(->.


C


llowhee


Jacksonville, Fla


^ B in An, Dr.imalic


A B in English, Order


A.B, m English. •X'lK


B, in Religion, Band,


A.B. in History




A B inEnghs


h.YDC-


A B in English, KA,


Arts. Fnelish, Car


of Old Lampshades,


Men's Glee Club; Un


ormitory Officer.






YRC; Univer


sity Par-


Campus thest, G M


olina Plaimakers


University Party


ivcrsity Party; West-


omen's Residence






ty




Committee, NROTC


C„r../,„„ Cl""".'r'>




minister Fellowship


ouncil; Orchestra,










NROTC Military Ball
Court, Student Legis-
lature, Student Party.
YWCA


Carolina Svnposium
Du.Jv fir Heel
GMAB; Petite Dra
malique;YDC




YMCA




^Ip ^St ^5^



COLEMAN,


COLLINS.


( OOLER.RUTH


tORRI , ANN


COWAN. SUSIE


C OWELI..JOHN


( R\Wf(lRD JR ,


1 RM I H,J W


MARYCONRM)


CAROLYN


ROSFMAR'I


( ANDAl E


FAYE


FRANKLIN




FDW\RD


Wadmakm Island,


Fl ORENCE


Waltcrboro,S <


Durham


Kannapolis


Summit. N J


S)lva


Gol


S,C


Atlanta. Ga


A B in English


A B in English and


.A.B in English; Cur-


A.B. m English; iKK


A.B in English; Car-


A B, in Religion


A,B, in English, K\H,


A.B in French, llll.l..




Dramatic An; Caro-


olinei Quancrty; Caro-




olina Quitrlerh\ Daily




Dormitory Officer;


Order of Beanhirds




lina Playmakers.


lins Symposium. Cos-




Tar Heel: Intramurals.




Secretary of *.\H.


Orientation C ouncilor ,






mopolitan Club;




University Party.




Scholarship Chairman


.Student Government






Student Parts




YDC.YMCA




of KAft; University

















Party; YWCA







CROOMJR.,


DALE. JR. .BILL


DEVINEY. MARIA


DIAL,


DILLARD.JR..


DOUGLAS.


DULA.BRENDA


DURHAM. JERRY


RALPH TAYLOR


Ashcville


ALEXIS


ROBIN


ROGER LEE


JULIETTE


LORRAIN


LAMONTE


Walha


A B in English, Base-


(harlolle


HOOD


. Sylv,,


THEODORA


Lenoir


Slaunlon. Vi


A.B, in English,


ball, Carolina Play-


A B inLrenth


Columbia, S,C


A B, in English, Slu-


Grecnsbon




A.B in English




makers




A-B in Philosophy.
iY;GMAB,


Jenl Parly, YRC


A B in English








ESKILDSEN.
SUSAN MARY

Charlolle
A.B, inGcrman;*BK;
Student Government



ETHERINCTON.
THEODORE
LEIGHTON



A B in Lnghs
AkK' r>a,h I,
Gorgon's He;



EVANS. JAMES



History. itiRK; Mil



RUSSELL

TENNEY

\.B, in English,



; HER. HUGH
;COMMON
Gaffney.S C,



FISHER. GORDON
DAVID

Pittsburgh, Pa.
A.B. in English; Alii-








jABRIEL.
CHARLES
ANDREW



GENUNC.II.

EREDERICK

MITCHELL

Plainrield.N-J
A.B, in English; M;
lEC. Orientation
Councilor; Lacrosse;



GILMAN.JR..

DON A I D

WAYNE

Newport News. Va
A.B, in Erench;it.BK;
*HS; Cosmopolitan
Club; French Award;
French Honors. New-
man Club; Spanish
Club ■- - -•



sJRAHAM.

CYNTHIA

MORGAN

Corpus Christi.

A.B. in Spanish;;)

Orientation Counc

University Party.



GRANT. REBECCA



slEA: YWCA




HAIL. LINDA
MORSE

Rockingham
A B, in English


HAMIl ION.
PATRICIA
MARGUERITL
J;icksonvillc.EI,

A B, in English, UIW




GMAB. YWCA, A
lorney General Stan-



Yack;YWCA.



HARRINGTON.


HARRIS.


H^RT.


HAYDEN.JOHN


HAYES.TED


HILL. FRANCES


HOLCOMBE.




HOLLAND. IV.


THOMAS


RICHARD


FRANKLIN F


JOSEPH


MILTON


HALE


FRANCES




ROBERT


FRANKLIN


C ASE'V


Avden


Suampscon. Mass


Durham




CAROLYN




WALTER


Moncuce


(.hdrlotte


A,B, m tngli5h:lil>F..


A.B- in English. Mon-


A B in Religion. Men's


A.B in English


Sparlanhurg,


C


Cincinnati. Ohio


A,B .n Engl.sh.Golf


A B inFnghsh.Dorm


GMAB.NROTC;Un-


ogram Cluh; Swim


Glee Club; Newman


A.B in French




A.B. in English; Si
.Anihony Halt




iior> Omcer


iversityParty;YMCA


ming.


ClublTreasurcrl.Slu-










HL'NDLEY.CARL


IVINS.GEORGE


JFRVE1.MAR1


JOHNSON.


KEEFE.


KINCHELOE. ANN


KIPPS. ANN


KITTS.JR .


WALLACE


.ANTHONY


GARDINER


LINDAJEAN


CHRISTOPHER


TERRY


MICHELE


JOHN ISIHR


Durham


Douners Grove. Ill


Greens illc.S C


Los Altos Hills. CahL


LEWIS


Raleigh


Blacksburg. Va.


C levcland Height


A.B, in English; Dorm-


A.B. in English


A.B. in English. Ki;


A.B. in English; Xil;


Somers.N.Y.


A B m English


A.B. in English; Dorm-


Ohi


itory OiTicer (Presi-




Student Government


OnentationCouncilor;


A.B. m French. X*.




itory Officer. Orien-


A B in English. Al


dent. .Aycock); More-




Comm.;YWCA.


Women's HonorCoun-


Cheerleader; Men's




tation Councilor.


Band. GMAB; Stu


head College Athletic
Comm. Chairman:
MRC;YRC






ciLYWCA


Glee Club.






dent Partv;WLINC





















KOELBL.
FRIEDERIKE

Bet Salzburg. AusI



KOONCE.JR..
EDWIN EARL
High Poi



ry. UNC ■! MCA



LAMBERT. JOHN
WALLACE

Raleigh
A.B. in English. 'lAH.
GMAB (Music Com-
mittee): Men's Glee-
Club; Men's Residence
Council. NROTC:
WUNC.



LANE. ROBERT
ELDER

Burlington



..AUNT.
JONATHAN
TAYLOR

Chenango Bridge.




\1 H.


1 1I)N \kl)


1 i W 1


s.l OWAKl)


LH MAN.


EIGHTY.


1 IITIF


RA(


HEL


LOUD.JOHN




MAI PHFRSON.






I IT




MARGARET


WAYNEITF


FMM,'






MFRRELL




H 1


H FFRSON


Bethesda. Md




High Point


Cincinnati, Ohio


MARSHA




Lin


-ointon


Washinglo


.D (


Wilmington. Del


Burlington


A.B. in English; Uni-


A.B. m


English. Card-


A.B. in English: Xn;


Paramus.N.J.


A B in English




A B in English


. ARE.


^ B in English. AY


i. in English and


versity Party. WAA


board


Orientation


Order of Beanbirds:


A.B. inSpanish:Span-








Gimghoul. Mo


nugram


•1411. Class ( abinct


nch.i\K.




Comm

idcnce
gram.


ouncilor: Res-
Advisor Pro-


University Party;
YWCA.


isb Club: YWCA.








Cluh. Ordei o
birds. Soccer,


Bean-


1 Finance ( ommitteel.
Cross Country . Mono-
gram Club. Order of
the Grail: Order of
the Old Well; Onenta-
tion Councilor, Stu-
dent Government Bud-
get Committee: Track.




\^mp.§



MacRAE.MARY


McCAlN.


McDANIEL.


McENTlRE.


McLEAN, HARRY


McLEAN. NANCY


McMillan, JOHN


MATTHEWS,


1 OUISE


DERRELL


NELSON BELL


VIRGINIA


ARDREY


CROOM


SAMUEL


KATHARINE


Charlolle


WATSON


New Bern


FOGLEMAN


Raeford


NewYorkCily. NY.


Coats


ELLIOTT


A B tn tngliih; Uni-


Mon


oe A.B. in French,


Chapel Hill


.\.B. in English. Kenan


A.B. in French; IlBilv


A B. in English.


Memphis, Tenn


verMly Parly. VDC-


A,B, in French


Mens Glee Club.


A.B. m English.


College Paper! Editor):


Orientation Councilor;




A.B. in English; .\i<l>


VRC.YWCA




Orienlalion Councilor.
CCUN.




YDC;YMCA.


Student Government
Comm.; University
Parly. VWCA.




Panhellenic Council
Student Legislature
Omce Assistant; Un
iversity Parly; Y'WC A
tCampus Chest)






MEDFORD.JAMFS














MEADS.ALMA


ALLEN


MFRREI L,JR ,


MINARD. FRANK


MOBI FY.JK


Milt ■\H\


MUKRA'i ,JR ,


NASH, DAVID


ELIZABETH


Waynesville


ROY EDWARD


PELL


C ARL McLAIN


WILLIAM


JOHN


ALAN


EhzabelhCily


A.B. in German, X*,


Poplar Branch


LAWRENCE


Williamston


MICHAEL


CLIFFORD


Charlott


A B in English. Bas-


YMCA iPresidenll;


A.B. in English; Stu-


Montclair, N.J.


A B. in English.


Winston-Salem


Asheboro


A,B. in English; Un


ketball Intramurals,


Order of the Grail;


dem Parly; YMCA.


A.B. in English; Si




A.B m English; Men's


A.B. in English; Men's


versity Party; YMCA


Senior Class Finance


Order of the Golden




Anthony Hall; Men's




Honor Council; On-


Residence Council;




Committee; Onenta-


Fleece; <I)Hi; i<l>A;




Residence Council;




entalion Councilor.


\'X>il. Baptist Student




lion Councilor; Wo-


Carolina Symposium;




Men'sGleeClub;Soc-




University Party.


Union




men's Residence
Council


Carolina Political Un-
ion; Order of the Old




cer; Student Parly.




YMCA.








riOLS, RALPH
HOWLAND

Pon Washington,
NY
A.B in French
NROTC; WUNC
UNC-Year-at-Lyon
University Chorale.



NOGGLE.JR.,
JAMES EDISON

Shelby



OTOOLE. DENNIS
THEODORE

Baskerville.Va
A B. in English and



OVERTON,
ASHLEY
CALHOUN

A.B. m English; i\
Order of the Nadulai



MARGARET



Student Party. YDC.



PARKER. SOPHIE PARROTT. RUTH

VICTORIA TURNER

Alexandria, Va Kinston

A.B.inEnglish;WAA. A.B. in French; Ori-
entation Councilor.
Student Party; Toron-
ti3 Exchange; UNC




POLLARD.
ELIZABETH
GIBSON

Eayelteville
B in English; AAH;



Class Cabinet; Men's
Honor Council; Ori-

Studenl Government



Panhellei
Unn





Online LibraryUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillYackety yack [serial] (Volume 1967) → online text (page 21 of 31)