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POWELI .
RICHARD
RANDOLPH

Asheville
A.B. in English; Arfifl;
AEA;*HS.



Graham Memorial So-



PUGH.JR .

WILLIAM

ALLEN
Charleston. West Va.
A.B. in German, ,\1';
Dully Tar Heel: Stu-
dent Party; University



K^l K>RD
HJWIN

A B mfn'glish"



REDMONJOHN


REID.GEORCE


REIGNWATER,


REIMERS.


REITZFL,


RICHARDSON




HAMILTON


NANCV


Wll 1 1AM


ELIZABETH


JR .VAN


Bernardsville


Winslon-Salem


MiKINNON


HANSllN




WALDRON


AB in English, Si


A B in English; Llni-


Saiishury


Ashcville


Raleigh


Thoma


Anlhoni H.ill.'I'BK


versilv Party.


A B in English; Uni-


AB. in English and


AB in English. ML


A B in English.






versity Party ;YMCA


History. Orientation
Councilor. Soccer.
University Parly.


Carolina Symposium
YWC.v'°"






• ^ ^ f .^




ROBERTSON.


RLSSEL


MAR-I


SMINDERS






SAUNDERS.


SCARBOROUGH,


SCATTERGOOD.J


SCHAREF.


SCHMK k. 111.


FRED


^UGL




GL"i S






JAMES EATON


SAVANNAH


HENRY


CHARLOTTE


CHARi rs


McLENNAN


Cle


eland Miss




Ra


eigh


New Canaan. Conn


ROSE


Villanova. Pa


GRAY


ALBFRl


Atlanta. Ga


A B in F


nghsh. \ll


A B. in Fnglis


h




A B in English;


Hamlel


A B in English, il'ki.


West Chesapeake. Va.


LAYEILI D


A.B. in English; XI'.


Panhcllcn
Toronto
Univers
YWCA


Exchange,
ly Parly;










AB. in English. 4-0.


Smmming


A B in English;
YWCA.


A.B in En'gli
AFROTC. Arnold
Society;CarolinaP
makers; Scabbard
Blade




SCHWAB. III.


SCOTT. JR..




SEARS. BFATRKE


SHELOR,


SITTERSON.JR .


S.MI


IN.


SMOAkE. ERNEST


SNEED.JOHN


Cincinniti Ohio


ALAN FULTON


LOUISE


ADELAIDE


JOSEPH


M


ATTHFW


CARLTON


RYMAN


AB in English. ikK.
Carolina Symposium.
Class Omcer. German


Sal


shury


Chesapeake. Va


CHENAULT


CARLYLE


A


1 ISON


Durham


Pmehms


AB- in English


Golf


A B in English. Ori-


Clearwater. Fla


Chapel Hill




Allanla.Ga


A B. in English


A B in English; BHII






enl.ilion I ounsilor


A B in French; House


A B in English St


A B


in English. k\.






Club; Gimghoul .












Uni








Men s Honor Council.






{oniniillee Sliiiknl




hna Simposium. Tine


\,M


\






Men's Residence






PaM\ Woiiicns .Xih-




Arts Feslnal. Student










Council; Order of the






lelic \ssiisi,ilion




Government C ommil-










Old Well. Order or










tee.'l MC\










Bcanbirds. Oriental ion




















Councilor; University






















SP\RKI1W.




Sl A( 1 . MAR'i


ST F PHI


NS




SUMNER. JR .


Sl 1 M '-.


DIlNAI n




PATRII lA




HERN


'\N 1 FT




JOHN




Gil MOKE




Gastoma






Kernersv


lie


SOUTHALL


H






A B in English. Dor-




B in


English


nd


Charlotte


A B in Engl


A.B. in Kngli


h. 1\.


milory OITicer. Stu-


H


story






A B. in English;


N;itional Slui


Orientation ( i




dents National Edu-










il'l'E; Class Cabinet;




Studeni Gov


niversT


cation Association;
YW( A.










Graham Memorial Ac-
tivities Board; Inler-


(Publicityl. L
Parly; YWC


ly Party; Yo


ng Re-












fratcrnily Council;




publicans Cluh














Men's Residence
Council; Orientation
Commitlee; Studeni
Legislature; Universi-
ty Pany; Young Re-






^JSM











TOMFOKD.








lUM. REBECCA


TAYLOR.


THOMPSON,


THRIFT.MICHAEL


WILLIAM


TROBAUGH.


TRULL.JOHN


LULL. VIRGINIA


Chapel Hill


MICHAEL LYN-


BENJAMIN


FRANCIS


WEBSTER


ROMA LEAH


IRVINE


ANNE


3. in French and


DON FINCH


FBORN


Winston-Salem


Memphis. Tennessee


Memphis, Tennessee


WeslHeld.N.J.


Wake Fore


meal Science. \11.


Chapel Hill


Aurora


A.B. m English; Ben;


A.B. in English, Caro-


A B, in English. \I1.


A B m French. Bl-lll;


A.B. Ill Eiiglish an


ss Officer; Orien-


A,B in English. X'l';


A.B in English. Bas-


Orientation Councilor;


lina Political Union;


Carolina Symposium;


Carolina Symposium.


Psychology. <|)\I;




Fencing. Mens Honor


ketball


Student Government


(Tarolina Symposium;


Dormitory Officer


Order of Beanbirds;


entatibn Councilo


ronto Exchange;


Council (Summert.




Committee; Universi-


Honors Program


IVice President). Stu-


Swimming; University


YWCA,


VCA.






ty Party; YMCA.


IFreshman and Sopho-
more); Order of the
Grail. Orientation
Councilor. <l>hl .
Swimming. Toronto
Exchange. YMCA


dent Government
sity Party.' YWCA


Party. YMCA.












VERLENDEN.HL










WILLIAM LANE








TYGART.


Lookout Mountain.


VINEYARD.


VINSON. Ml.


VIVERETlf


FREDERICK


ROBERT ROYAL


JAMES ALLEN


EUGENE A


BRENT




Whanon, Texas


Goldsboro


Rock


Jacksonville. Florida


A.B. in English; 4KE;
Carolina Political Un-
ion; Carolina Sympo-


A.B. in English; Caro-


A B. in English.


A.B inPhilost


A B in English; KA;
Lacrosse. NROTC:


lina Quarterly.






Swimming; University


sium; Lacrosse, Mon-








Pany


ogram Club; Order of
Ihe Grail; Order of the
Old Well;<l>Bk;*H:i.;









W. \l 1 . IK .Jl


HN


WALLS. Wll LIAM


WARLK k. ANN


M 1 SON




RALPH


tVLLI N


Rock


ingham


Asheville


Granite F


A.B in English


.*MA;


A.B. in French; *BK;


A.B. in English. S


'HIK; (MIX; (


arolina


'l»[^i; Campus Chest;


dent Govcrnm


Symposium. F


ne Arts


Orientation Council-


Committee iPla


Festival; Orde


of the


or; Student Govern-


ment); Graham \


Old Well; *M


\ Rush


ment Committee; Uni-


mortal Film Comn


Chairman; S


tudent


versity Party.


tee; Yiicten Yuck





J'^kmM





















WITT, FLORENCE


WEST. JR..


WHITAKER,




WHITE. JR.


WILKlNSON.il,


WILLlAMS.Ill.


WILLIAMS.


WILLIAMSON


JR .


ELDER


GEORGE F


WILLIAM




DAVID HENRY


WILLIAM


BRYANT


COURLENAY


ROBERT




Chattanooga, Tenn


Camden, S.C


ASBURY




Charlotte


KENNETH


BENNETT


ARMISTEAD


LAWRENCE




A.B. in Latin; \n
Carolina Forum; Car


A B. in English; iAE;


Winston


-Salem


A.B. in English and


Waynesboro. Va.


Elizabeth City


Rapidan. Va


Moun


Airy


University Party


A B. m Englis


. AKE;


History; Semper Fi-


A.B. in English Edu-
cation; A*!!. IB*;


A B in English; IIKA;


A.B. in English; .\12,


A B in English;




olina Political Union




Campus Chest




delis Society; Univer-


University Parly


Carolina Symposium;






Order of the Old Well




lina Symposiun


, Elec-


sity Party,


Dormitory Officer




Dormitory Officer.






Orientation Commit




lions Board. El






IFdilor of News-




University Party.






tee. Student Govern




Festival; One


ntation




paper); YDC-YRC;




YWCA.






ment Committee




B P



^^h > SnL




WOMACK.JAMES


WOOD. NORMAN


WOOD. P


S.


EUGENE




Selma


Raleigh


s,.,,il


A B, in English; Band;


A.B. in Spanish; 1>Ki.




Cheerleader, Dormi-


Carolina Handbook;




tory Officer.


Circulo Hisiianico;
Dormitory Officer;


Slii'ki-i 1 >




Intramurals; Resi-


versin P.,r




dence College Officer






(Senator); Men's Hon-






or Council. Student





EN. PETER


WORTHINGTON.


WUEHRMANN.


1 ARBOROUGH.


HI R


STEPHEN


JANET LINDA


RICHARD




DANIEL


Birmingham. Alabama


FENNER


. ■ \K1 .


Ayden


A B in English; K-i,


Louisburg




A B in English;


Panhcllenic CouncTI.


A B, in English; JAE;
Campus Chest Com-


1 ■ K k.


AFROTC. Carobin-


Student Government


■. IViir.


ers; Fencing.


Committee; Student


mittee; Class Cabinet;






Legislature; Student


University Party;






Party; Women's Ath-


YMCA



YOUNG.

ELIZABETH

COURTNEY
Charleston, S.C.
A.B. in French; 4A4.



JOURNALISM



Professor of Journalism Walter Spearman is well-known on the UNC
campus for two reasons: first, he is the instructor of Book Reviewing
and Dramatic Criticism for Newspapers (Journalism 60), one of the
most popular courses in any department (and mainly due to Dr.
Spearman's knowledge and personality); and second, he is the father
of former Student Body President and Rhodes Scholar, Robert Spear-
man. In this dual position he is perhaps better qualified than most in
understanding the student at the University: "How does one generahze
about 'the Carolina student and Carolina life'? One of the most exciting
aspects of teaching at UNC is to see the maturing, intellectual growth
and widening of horizons for a student between his freshman entrance
and his senior departure — particularly fn those students who come here
honestly in search of an education rather than looking for four years
of postponing a career decision or avoiding the draft. Regular college
courses are the basic reason for being here. Some students realize
this, others do not. But I have also seen a lot of growth and develop-
ment through student government activities, the Symposium and Fine
Arts Festival, the Tar Heel. Playmakers, and other extra-curricular
interests. What gives me concern is the large number of students who
drift aimlessly through their four- or five-years, with little focus either
on academic work or in extra-curricular activities. .As the University
grows larger, the students to become lost in the mass or adrift in an
eight-story dormitory. I am particularly pleased with the development
of the residence college system, particularly worried over the lack of
sufficient counseling and advice for frtshman and sophomores. I think
fraternities and sororities on the campus need to shift their focus from
the purely social aspects of life to some genuine encouragement of
academic excellence and member participation in campus activities,
while dormitories need to provide greater sense of belonging to a small
unit and also better social activities for those not in fraternities.



Occasionally the University of North Carolina is fortunate in having
as lecturers men who have enjoyed distinguished careers in the non-
academic world. Such a man is Mark Etheridge, nationally distinguished
journalist — a man decorated with numerous honors, including hon-
orary degrees. He sees his role here at the University to "primarily
give students the benefit of what experience I have had in newspaper
work." Since that experience is quite extensive, students who take his
course can certainly profit from it. They can also learn much from Mr.
Etheridge's long assotiation with public life, and his application of this
association to current issues: "I am interested in all public questions,
including Vietnam, civil rights, and the silly brown-bagging law. Also,
it seems stupid to me that there should be talk of a tax reduction as
long as North Carolina is so far down the scale of states in education."



Professor of Journalism Kenneth R. Byerly is unusually well-informed
on all phases of University life, having taught geography (and served
as an assistant to the late Dr. Collier Cobb) before moving into the
department of journalism. It is his belief that the professor plays an
essential part in the University; his role "in the career of students is
to stimulate them to learn and understand, give them the information
and ideas they seek, and be demanding in a way that will better prepare
them in mind and mores for the outside life ahead." Dr. Byerly dis-
charges his own professorial duties by fulfilling this obligation and by
pursuing research in his field, keeping up with new thinking and de-
velopments, and serving the journalism and other fields in the outside
world as well as the University. His own personal concern is with
people — "their thoughts, troubles, satisfactions and joys," and he
exhibits this concern for the "people" of UNC in both his academic
position and his position as advisor to the Publications Board.



In no area is the relevance of the academic world to the non-academic
more crucial or contested than in journalism; for years professors and
professional journalists have argued whether collegiate preparation or
on-the-job training provides the formula for a successful career. "The
academic world must have relevance to the outside world," states
Alumni Distinguished Professor of Journalism Norval Neil Luxon.
"because we in the field of professional education for journalism are
engaged in preparing young men and young women to enter the area
of communications." Responsibility to one's public, according to
Dr. Lu.\on, is the essence of a good journalist and the aim of under-
graduate journalism training: "The individual . . . should be qualified
to interpret the events to his readers or listeners. Thus, in courses in
journalism, I personally feel a responsibility to arouse or awaken in
the student a sense of his responsibility to the public which he will
serve." But how is this responsibility to be awakened, what exactly is
the role of the journalism professor in preparing his students? For
Professor Luxon his task is "to keep pace with the rapidly changing
developments in my area, to transmit to the students in my classes an
awareness of these changes and their significance, and to do what I
can personally to see that . . . scholars are granted complete freedom
to pursue truth." In light of this last statement. Dr. Luxon has a great
concern about the free press — fair trial controversy between news-
papermen and lawyers, and in general about freedom of the press.




Mark Etheridge




Norval Neil Luxon



LEXANDER.
MARGARET
LYLE

Chariot
B. in Journalism


BENNETT.
STEPHEN
JOSEPH
e Winslon-Salem

Caroline, Hu„dh,„jk
(Managing Editor):
Class Cabinet (Pub-
Chairman). Dailv Ttir
Heel: Orientation


BERNISH.PAUL
ANTHONY

Charlotte
A,B, in Journalism.
PressCluhlPresidentl;
WUNC


BLACKMAN.JR,,
EDWIN TUTTLE
Gainesville. Ga,
A B. in Journalism,


DePRIEST.JR,,
JOSEPH
SAMUEL

Shelby
A.B. in Journalism;
Press Club; UNC
Journalist.


PINCH. ESTHER
SHARON

Thomasville
A B in Journalism;
lIB't-, Dormitory Ol-
ficer. Homecoming
Court. Press Club;
SludentParty;YWCA.


HASS. MARSHALL
WILLIAM

Falls Church, Va-
A.B. in Journalism;
XAX; Daily Tar Heel.
WUNC


HENKEL.MIRIAM
HUSON

Kinston

Carolina Women's
Council; Dormitory
OITicer; UNC Press
Club-


















Councilor; UNC
yt>u/-n(j/(j/( Editor!















(^



%^^<^






w^^mMJ^h^kJ^M^i




HOAR, STEPHEN
















WARREN


HOLLAND, 111,


JA( kSON.


JACKSON.


KAPLAN.


KURTH. FRANZ


LAIL. WILLIAM


l.AUTERER.


Sumter. S. C,


SHERRILL


MARVIN WADE


WALTER ALLEN


ALEXANDER


JEFFREY


STEVE


JONATHAN


A.B, in Journalism


REID


Princeton


Durham


Brooklyn. NY.


Hicksville.N. Y.


Hickory


GREGORY


and English. iDHI;


Statesville


A.B, in Journalism and


A-B. in Journalism;


A B- in Journalism.


A,B, in Journalism;


A,B. in Journalism;


Chapel Hill


*BK; <t>MA Sinfonia;


A,B, in Journalism;


Radio. Television. Mo-


S4X;AFROTC; Car-


Daily Tar Heel.


Cross-Country; Dorm-


I<l>E;i4X;Cardboard;


A B. in Journalism;


KTA; Band (Sccrc-


cUTi; *Hi; Sopho-


lion Pictures; Press


olina Political Union.




itory Officer; Mono-


Dui7v7orHff/;DDrm-


Band; Z>(i//v Tar Heel;


laryl; Canterbury


more Honors Program;


Club;Inlramurals. Stu-


DOM; Dormitory Of-




gram Club; MRC;On-


itory Officer; Press


WUNC


Club; Carolina Sym-


University Party-


dent Party; WUNC-


ficer; Freshman Camp;




enlation Councilor;


Club




posium; Daih- Tar




TV.


Press Club;VMCA.




Track,






Heel, Fine Arts Fes-
















tival; Order of the Old
















Well, Symphony Or-
















chestra





















LAZARUS.

DEBORAH ANNE
Charlotte



Council. Univ




iAX (President
AFROTC; Arnold ;
Society; Cardboai
ry Squadr



the Old Well; One
lalion Councilor; Scab-
bard and Blade; Stu-
dent Parly; UNC
Journalist, UNC Press



MITCHELL, TREVA



UNC Press Club



OPTON. JAMES
DELEVIE
Woodbridge.Co




1 Playmakers. De-



Heel. WUNC,



CER,


TEAGUE,


WALL. FRANCES


RILYNGALE


KATHERINE


MIAL


Rocky Mount


ROSEMARY


Whitevi


n Journalism,


Davidson


A.B- in Journalis




A.B, in Journalism;


Dormitory Office




AAfl; GMAB (Public-


UNC Press Club; U




ity Committee); Mono-


versify Parly; YDC,




gram Club (Carolina






Sweetheart); Orienta-






tion Councilor; Panhel-






lehic Council; Univer-






sity Party; UNC Press






Club;WAA;YWCA.





WILLIAMS. DAVID
ARNOLD

Battlcboro




The question of whether the academic world sets the standards for
the everyday world or merely follows those set by the latter is always
one of great interest, especially in the sciences where there is often the
conflict between pure research and research for consumer items. Dr.
H. E. Lehman, Professor of Zoology and chairman of the department,
believes that the "academic world never is, and most certainly never
should try to be in step with its own times. It should be both far in
advance of the outside world in the recognition of creativity and in
giving refuge to the ideas that will mold the future. It should provide
a damper to excesses of political and social innovation that are in the
long test of history ill-advised. The Academic world is most relevant
to the outside world, therefore, in being entrusted with the respon-
sibilities for intuition and wisdom on the major problems facing the
future of mankind."



H. E. Lehman




The conflict between research and teaching is one that perennially
raises its head, and is of special importance in the natural sciences. For
Associate Professor of Chemistry Donald C. Jicha,, however, there is
no conflict; the two, rather, are complementary: "Through my search
for knowledge, my creative use of academic findings and my respect
for academic ideals, I can inspire other students to draw from the
university those elements which will enable them, in turn, to contribute
to the university via their contributions to themselves and to society."
Moreover, he interprets his position in a student's life not as one of
meeting his needs, but "of making him aware of needs not yet realized
and of preparing him to function effectively without the crutch of the
instructor." All this is not to say that Dr. Jicha is removed from stu-
dents — far from it; for him the ruison d'etre of the academic world
is the basic education of the student by exposing him to generative
courses. In this way, "his exposure to basic elements of reasoning will
enable him to meet new situations and to draw conclusions from
matters academic and nonacademic."



Yale trained physical chemist Richard C. Jamigan takes his work
very seriously, as a respectable scholar should. He sees his role in the
academic career of future scholars as one who demonstrates and points
the way, not as one who makes others learn: "I can present a subject
as it appears to me; only the individual can teach himself. I can give
guidance and state niv opinion as counselor; only the individual can
make his decisions." Un the nature of the individuals who make up the
student body here. Dr. Jarnigan feels that "students appear to me to
be much the same everywhere; some are aggressive, some are com-
pliant, some are eager, some are not "students"." Professor Jarnigan
believes that for those who have made it through the gauntlet of stu-
dent ordeals and become professionals in the sciences, "there is little
difference between the everyday world and the academic world. Small
differences in distribution of responsibilities exist but the basic goals
are the same."



It is often felt by many that the sciences are dehumanizing — causing
the men who work in them to lose their aesthetic appreciation, their
religion, and their sensitivity for human relationships. If this char-
acterization is correct. Dr. Vinton A. Hoyle certainly does not fit the
mold: "The technological advances in the sciences have come almost
exclusively from the academic world. In large part the research is
done in the universities, the remaming by university trained people
who have forsaken the academic world, drawn by more money. Many
of these later return to the academic field. Our lives are so tied up
in and controlled by machines that it is needless to dwell on it. Sadly
to say, advances in our relations with our fellowman has not kept
pace with those in machines. We need to spend more time and money
in this direction." In light of this feeliiig. Professor Hoyle believes
"that the Church has a large job to do, in addition to the much it has
done in the past."



Vinton A. Hoylc




Thomas W. Noonan

Assistant Professor of Physics (specializing in astronomy) Thomas
\V. Noonan is rather outspoi^en on the subject of students and student
life at Carolina. He feels that the average student finds little academic
satisfaction, needing only beer parties and sex; most amusing to Pro-
fessor Noonan is the students' attitudes toward exams, which he has
reduced to a four point formula: "The purpose of any exam is to
produce a prolonged state of tension and anxiety, therefore, 1) Do
not study any material for the course until the night before the exam
The desired state of shock results from looking at material neve:
before seen. It helps for the student to get behind in all his courses:
2) Stay up all night before the exam, in order to achieve the prope
state of physical fatigue. In the case of a final, stay up the two pre
vious nights; 3) During the necessary breaks in your pre-exam study
(latrine, water, pills, etc.) let your mind be weighted heavily with the
importance of the exam in determining your grade and the importance
of the grade in determining your future. In no case should you allow
your mind to wander; and 4) During the exam, go through the
questions in order. Finish one before going to the next. Avoid any
wandering of the mind as this may permit mental relaxation. Do not
leave your seat, as you want to maintain physical fatigue. If there is
any uncertainty about the meaning of a question, figure it out yourself;
do not ask the instructor." Needless to say. Dr. Noonan interprets
his task as persuading students to follow the opposite of this strategy.




L. Y. Lehman



NATURAL SCIENCES




VtS.l.ARRV



( VRIL


■ANDREWS. JR.


ARIHUR.BbTSV


ATKINS. WILLIAM


BAIIEV. BOBBIE


ONV


GR.AHAM


( HFR1 1


SHAFFiiR


JEAN


Fayellevtl


t i_AMBETH


Princelon


Asheyille


Aiken. S,C.


hemiNlry


Burlmglon


B 5 in Medical Tecti


A B. in Chemistry; Ori-


B.S- in Medical Tech-




B,S. in Mathemalics:


nolngy


emacion Councilor.


nology; AAIl ; Band Ma-




,\XA; AFROTC; Ar-




W.X


joretle; Dormitory Of-




nold Air Society.






Committee;Orienlalion
Councilor; Student Par-
ty; WAA; Women's
Honor Council; YRC;
YWCA; Campus Carn-
ival; Medical Technol-
ogy Club, ■



EANN
Charlolie
B.S. in Medical Tech-
nology : KKF (Treasur-
" Carolina Symposi-






HENDERSON.


mlE


RICHARD




ELLIOTT LKF


^Bt ^^^^^


Mi-Kinc
B.S. in ChcmiMrv,


T?*^


\XS. A<1>A. 'Mli,


^ V- "W


*BK; Cardboard


T - ^


yRC:YMCA


, ^


HORNEY.MARY

ANN


£1^


B.S in Medical Tech-


m^


nology; KKF; Carolina


F^m


Symposium; Carolina


Women's Council;




Class Cabinec; Dormi-


M>m


tory Officer; Orienla-


lion Councilor; Uni-





HOLDER.
WALTER
DALTON








McCALLUM.
CHARLES
W[LLIAM

Rowland




POLLMAN.


€^


ROGER MARK


IRi ^^


Albany. NY.


n


B S inChemislr>.


^




NF^ :>




^^^ ^. '.:i^




^tfP\# ^'-'^






KEEVER.JR.


^B^


FREDERICK


Kti^K^F


LESTER


Maiden


^^^« ?■*


B.S in Malhemalics;


^ M


Auorney Generals




StafV.lmramurals.Un-




iversilyPany;YMCA.


JW^W




.^^m



PRICE. WILLIAM
RAYMOND

Wallace



REIDER, HORACE
OLIVER

Rosemonl. Pa,




Ncwiand
B.S. in Medical Tech-
nology, AMI; Home-
coming Queen; Social
Chairman of Soph
Class; Universily Par-
ly. C.V- Day Coun,
Onenlation Councilor



TUCKER.
THOMAS
RANDOLPH

Virginia Beach. Va.
B S. in Physics;
AFROTC: Orienla-
tion Councilor; Uni-
versity Party. Attor-



VANPELT,
MAX LEE

Kannapolis
~ " n Physics;



WADSWORTH.
JAMES ALLAN
Hendersonville
B.S in Mathematics;
Onenlation Councilor.
Tennis; Resident Ad-




ARD.JOE
FRANK

Freeport. Fla,
B.S, in Mathematics,




Online LibraryUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillYackety yack [serial] (Volume 1967) → online text (page 22 of 31)