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WHITE. JR.

HOWARD

VERNON

Rocky Mount
B.S.inPhysics;MRC;
Men's Honor Coun-
cil


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WHITEHURST.
JOHN HOWARD
Wilson
A B, in Chemistry
Band, Dormitory offi-
cer. University Party


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EDWARD A

Lenoir
B.S- in Geology


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YAGER.

VIRGINIA
MONROE

Dahlonega. Ga
A.B.m Chemistry.



ZIMMERMAN,
NEIL STEVEN

Atlanta. Ga



..



SCHOOL OF NURSING




Dean of Nurses
Elizabeth L. Kemble



Mrs. Ann Thomas



Mrs. BeHy B. West




IJPw^'^' i



Margaret L. Moore makes the following comments:
"We, in Physical Therapy, have the opportunity and, I
believe, privilege of working more closely with our students
than is possible in many other programs on this campus. The
thirty freshmen who are accepted onto this campus for study
are known to us prior to their admission and we have the
opportunity of working with them informally during the two
years that they are in the general college. We then get to
know sixteen students in our junior and senior classes in the
School of Medicine very well and feel that the closeness with
which we deal with the students is helpful to them and to us
in our teaching efforts. We are one program which has not
gotten too large for close and cordial student and faculty
exchange, and we hoF>e to maintain this type of liason with
our student body. This phase of our activity is most gratifying
and has appeared to our students, both at the freshman level
and the junior-senior level, as well as to our graduate, as
one of the hall marks of our program."

"My contacts are largely with small classes — mostly girls
— of Carolina students. I find them attractive, intelligent and
delightful to teach, I have always been impressed with the
loyalty of the majority of Carolina students and alumni."
These are the feelings of Marj Clyde Singleton, Professor of
Physical Therapy: certainly this respect for her students is
reflected in her devotion to leaching, in which her aim is to
prepare physical therapists as well as possible for their
careers. "My teaching responsibilities for the most part lie
in the field of anatomy as related to physical therapy students.
Particular courses are gross anatomy, histology, and neuro-
anatomy. The objective is to present these subjects with a
specific emphasis on those areas of essential importance to
the physical therapist."



Mary Clyde Singleton





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PHYSICAL THERAPY



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY



Someone has said: ". . . each man has his own potential in terms of
achievement and service." George Philip Hager was elected to be the
sixty-fifth president of the American Association of Colleges of
Pharmacy because his colleagues were aware of his potential and
impressed by his rectitude. In Dean Hager the Association recognized
a man who. cognizant of the currents and undercurrents of professional
opinion, could express the purposes and the problems of the Association
in clear, nonemotional terms. On this relationship between the academic
pharmaceutical institution and the professional pharmacist. Dr. Hager
believes that "there is no question about the great importance of a
high level of sensitivity and responsiveness on the part of the academic
community to the dynamic needs of modern society. Perhaps this fact
is particularly pertinent to the roles of health professional schools. I
believe that our attitude can be epitomized by a statement published
recently by Dr. James L. Dennis in the American Journal of Public
Health: 'A medical center can assume a meaningful role in the commun-
ity only if it complements the triad of 'education, research and service'
with a fourth charge — that of medical social responsibility.' In my
opinion, where 'medical' appears in this statement, it should be in-
terpreted generically as 'health professional.' Alternatively, I would
substitute 'pharmaceutical' to express the particular aspirations of the
School of Pharmacy.




Cieorjie P. Hager. Dean



"In the area of civil liberties, the South has now accepted equal
rights for all citizens. Unfortunately, we have accepted this slowly and
reluctantly. Throughout this period and still today we are acting
defensively. If we could take the initiative we could make rapid progress
without serious interference and do it in the manner best suited to our
circumstances. We need good leadership in the South and from the
South in this movement." Dr. A. M. MaHocks of the School of
Pharmacy understands his task to be an instrument in providing such
leaders, not just for civil rights but for all facets of Southern life;
"My role is primarily that of a stimulant — stimulate the interest of
the student, encourage him to develop his talents, make him aware of
the opportunities. 1 feel that the individual attains maximum satis-
faction through maximum contribution to society. The student's
greatest obstacle today is the lack of courage to endure the hardships,
face the sacrifices necessary to reach his peak. The outside world still
looks to the University for leadership in thought. We must make
greater effort to give them the leadership they seek."




A. M. Mattocks



Dr. Claude Piantadosi, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Bio-
chemistry, interprets his task in the preparation of future pharmacists
and others as threefold: "To provide students with a general, scientific
and professional education necessary for a fruitful and satisfying career
in the health sciences relating to the discovery, production, custody,
and use of drugs and to help them to realize their role in society; to
develop in the students an inquiring and critical mind, a sense of per-
sonal and professional responsibility and charitable attitude toward
mankind; and to provide the student with the necessary educational
equipment to function competently not only for the present but also to
meet the demands of the future."




Claude Piantadosi



Father of a growing family of eight. Dr. James I-. Brannon, Jr., has
an intense interest in life around him. This interest extends, of course,
to his students at the Pharmacy .School, whose senior class this year
he describes as "red-hot." Students in general. Dr. Brannon believes,
are "a little artificial around the edges, hut on the whole — solid";
his own role in the preparation of these individual he hopes is "a
real live one." He would like to see the University as a whole become
more relevant to the everyday world by being more down to earth.



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James L. Brannon. Jr.




m

CLASS OFFICERS — LEFT TO RIGHT, SEATED: Howard
Michael, PresidenI, Senior Class; Ann Willis, Secretary-Treasurer,
Senior Class; Linda Lynch, Secretary-Treasurer, 4/5 Class: Wayne
Smith, President, 2/5 Class. STANDING: Charles Myers, V-Presi-
dent, Senior Class; Ted Neal, President, 3/5 Class; Kay McCray,
Secretary-Treasurer, 3/5 Class; Ben Williams, V-President, 3/5
Class; Carl Taylor, President, 4/5 Class; Joe Rowe, V-President,
4/5 Class.

STUDENT BRANCHES OF APHA AND NCPA OFFICERS — L. TO R.: Richard Dameron
— Executive Committee; Doug Wilkorsoii — X'u-v President: Linda Lynch — Treasurer; Pat
Owen — Secretary; Bob Lowe — President; llol) Iniiun — Assistant to President.



Founded in 1897 and offering a complete five year phar-
maceutical program, the School of Pharmacy provides the finest
pharmaceutical education and is recognized as one of the top
schools of pharmacy in the nation under the leadership of Dean
George P. Hager. The past year has found tremendous strides
taken in building a graduate program and a faculty second to
none. Today's students will be tomorrow's pharmacists ready to
adapt to their rapidly changing profession.

Many fine student organizations provide the student with a well
rounded education and social program as exemplified by <#>Sx, k'^,
K€. px. and the Student Branches of the North Carolina and
American Pharmaceutical Associations.

In addition to the standard instruction of the pharmacy students
other programs have been undertaken such as guest lecturers,
seminars held by prominent men in the pharmaceutical field, and
undergraduate research programs.

During this year the School of Pharmacy has vastly broadened
its already extensive research program including the new field of
biopharmaceutics. The school has extended its research program
with adjunct professors at the Research Triangle Center and Oak
Ridge Research Center and with the School of Medicine and
Public Health. This school is a fine example of the progress being
made in the pharmaceutical profession.



STUDENT BODY OFFICERS — L. TO R.:
James Ray Hall, Vice-President; Jean Winter,
Secretary and Treasurer; Steve Kennedy, Presi-
dent.




PHARMACY SENATE —
FRONT ROW, LEFT TO
RIGHT: James Ray Hall,
President; Tim Krobath,
Charlie Rhoden, Greg Jenk-
ins, Richard Greene, Smoot
Cranfill, Joe Rowe, Ted
Neal. SECOND ROW: Dale
Massey,John Freeman, Dave
Young, Ronnie Swain, Alan
Barkelay, Joe Johnson, Den-
nis Beatty, Larry Horis.
BACK ROW: Bob Lowe,
Jerry Kennedy, Mickey
Whitehead, Ed Lowdermilk,
Steve Freeman, Stan Hay-
wood, Gene Anderson, Ben
Williams, Harold Bolick,
Steve Kennedy.




SOCIAL SCIENCES




There is often a conflict between the scholarly and brilliant faculty
member and the popular teacher. On the one hand he has distinguished
his department, his university, and himself by his research and publica-
tions, but is a poor and aloof professor; or. on the other, he is an
interested and enlightening instructor hut has not completed successful
research. This, however, is not the case with Professor of Economics
David T. Lapkin: he is an accomplished scholar, having been trained
at Harvard and Columbia, served as an economic advisor for the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, and prepared for publication an
exhaustive study of the central and commercial banking system in the
United States; he is also, however, popular in the classroom with both
undergraduates and graduates, as exhibited by the frequent "closing-
out" of his courses. Professor Lapkin. in fact, blends the two seem-
ingly opposed areas by imparting to others through the classroom the
benefits of his research and knowledge. Moreover, he takes a deep
interest in Carolina students, particularly the honors students that he
advises, ll is a mark of his concern for his department and his field
that he is ever excited at the increasing number of those honors candi-
dates who decide to major in economics.



Asked about his feeling on the relevance of the academic world to
the everyday world outside. Dr. John Thibaut. Chairman of the Psy-
chology Department, replied rather strongly in favor of the academic;
"It's the relevance of the everyday world that I worry about." Indeed,
he is rather pleased with the University today, and the contemporary
Carolina student; "Both are bigger, better, and brighter than they were
30 years ago." Yet, even as a psychologist, he has an identity problem;
"No student has ever been able to give me a clear-cut answer to the
question of my role in their academic career. My role in general
university life is equally mysterious."



John H. Thibuiil



Dr. Carl S. BIyth has had a long career at the University of North
Carolina, having received his MA and PhD here before joining the
faculty. At the same time, however, he has also enjoyed a distinguished
career in areas outside the University, having served as chairman of
the NCAA committee on Competitive Safeguards, chairman of the
American Football Coaches Association committee on Athletic Injuries,
and a member of the Research Task Force of the President's Council
on Physical Fitness. Though his main concern is physiology and anat-
omy as they apply to athletics. Professor Blyth's extra-scholastic in-
terests also apply to national issues: "I believe all aspects of our national
life are influenced by the "limited" war in Vietnam. This issue is
focused more forceably on our campus where the war and draft play
such a dominant role in the career planning of the Carolina student.
The emphasis on grades and the urgency with which too many students
attack their academic work is a result of the Vietnam war in particular
and the political unrest in the world in general. I am hopeful that the
proposal of allowing a student to take certain courses bearing only a
pass or fail grade will remove some of the emphasis on grades and thus
reduce unnecessary pressures on the student.



One of the first items encountered by students in Political Science 41
is a not-so-little collection of readings in American Political Theory and
Practice: in fact, this book becomes a Bible that all learn to know and
love. One of the authors, Dr. Andrew M. Scott, would surprise most of
the fans of his te.\t by his tremendous sense of humor. He sees his role
in university life as an agitator, while with the students themselves he
says, "I try not to do any harm." At the time of his interview, he slated
that the current event of most interest to him was Christmas vacation.
On the serious side, however. Professor Scott's academic credentials are
impressive, having received his AB from Dartmouth, his MA, MPA,
and Ph.D. from Harvard, and having taught at Dartmouth and Haver-
ford before he came to UNC. Besides the text. Politics: USA. men-
tioned above that he wrote with UNC Professor Earle Wallace. Dr.
Scott has published seven other books ranging from Communism to
Congress and Lobbies, in addition to numerous articles. He has con-
tributed greatly to the strength of the Political Science Department, par-
ticularly in the field of U. S. Foreign Relations; but what many do not
know is his contribution to the James Bond gang as a past member of
the CIA and the Mutual Security Agency.



"All kinds of students are found at Chapel Hill. The life they live is
by turns colorful, dull, gay, tragic, joyous, hopeless, and always dis-
ordered." These words express the view held by Dr. G. V. Taylor on
Carolina students and Carolina life. One of those rare birds specializing
in European History (rare for a university almost totally oriented to
American Studies), Professor Taylor is one of the most popular instruc-
tors in the History Department. He has received the Tanner Award
for Excellence in Teaching, and has been made an honorary member of
the Order of the Golden Fleece; he sees his role as "indicating some
ways in which knowledge can be developed, formulated and organized;
convincing students that no idea may ever he granted sanctuary from
criticism; and communicating the excitement of scholarship."

The past few years have been ones of controversy over the place
of the University in society. "The mission of the academic world is lo
provide the non-academic world a great variety of discoveries and
services." says Dr. Taylor, "one of which is to study the non-academic
world, criticize it, and interpret it to itself." In order that the academic
society fulfill these responsibilities, he believes that it "must remain
intellectually and politically autonomous and, to that extent, separate
from the society in which it exists." Yet, he is not advocating an ivory
tower University, for he himself is vitally interested in the problems
of the twentieth-century: "Behind all the great twentieth-century issues
lies the question of whether a full, dignified, and meaningful life is or
is not to be made possible for every man, no matter where or in what
condition he has been born, to choose or reject." Indeed, G. V. Taylor
is a man vitally concerned with all facets of life and living.




George V. Taylor




To Professor of History Stephen B. Baxter, present individual liber-
ties and Early Modern English History are closely related. The struggle
of the English people to gain personal freedom through three dynasties
(Tudor, Stuart, and Hanoverian) closely parallels the struggle of all
people to be free from the whim of tyranny. An interest in administra-
tive efficiency (i.e.. the growth of English governmental administration)
also characterizes Dr. Baxter's research and teaching specialization. A
graduate of Harvard College and Ph.D. recipient from Trinity College,
Cambridge. Professor Baxter has recently completed a major biography
of William III. in addition to his Development of the Treasury. 1660-
7 702. and numerous articles and reviews. Although his scholarly attitude
appeals particularly to graduate students, his courses in Medieval Eng-
land. Tudor and Stuart England, and Eighteenth Century England
attract a great number of undergraduates. Dr. Baxter's popularity is
further indicated by his membership in Gimghoul. and his position as
Chawbacon in the Mutton and Shoats Society. And while many of his
students wonder why he spends so much time locked in the solitude
of his office, those who know him are sure that it is actually a haven
from his six children.



Lewis Lipsitz, Assistant Professor in the UNC Political Science De-
partment and "child prodigy" in his field (having received his AB at
the age of eighteen), represents a growing but still small number of
American professors making a deep commitment to intellectual activism
off campus as well as on campus. Professor Lipsitz integrates his extra-
curricular and his teaching interests by pursuing research into the polit-
ical orientations of the poor now in progress, into democratic theory and
attitudes toward authority, and into political sociology and psychology.
He is a member and quasi-advisor of the UNC chapter of the Americans
for Democratic .Action. .Mthough he teaches two undergraduate courses.
Political Science 165 and 166 (Eighteenth Century and Contemporary
Political Theory). Dr. Lipsitz is probably better known to the greater
part of the Chapel Hill campus for his views on pacifism and civil
rights. Nevertheless his credentials as a scholar are fully as impressive
as his record of action on timely moral issues: he received his Bac-
calaureate from Chicago and his Ph D. from Yale, and has authored
numerous articles ranging from "Working-Class Authoritarianism" to
a study of due process during the aftermath of the Kennedy Assasina-
tion. Furthermore, he is devoted to poetry, with contributions to Lil-
labiilero and a volume of poetry — Cold Water — to be published in
1967.



It is most interesting to obtain the views of a sociologist of life among
the Carolina natives. Associate Professor of Sociology H. Douglas
Sessoins, Chairman of the Curriculum in Recreation .Administration and
Director of the OEO \lulti purpose Training Center, is a man very
qualified to make such obsor\.utons. He sees a healthy student atmos-
phere: "To me. Carolina student life does not differ greatly from the
student cultures on most large university campuses. We are a heterogen-
eous student body, and this is healthy, in fact necessary, for the com-
plete education of the Carolina student. This is one of the attractions
of the UNC campus, and from it I derive a great deal of pleasure since
it brings me in contact with students from diverse backgrounds and
opinions." Dr. Sessoms is also plc.ised with the state of the University
in general, and enjoys its opportunities: "The University is a world unto
its own, having its own proces,ses and normative patterns. It shares the
values of the larger culture but gives greater emphasis and meaning
to certain ones of these. For example, I think we find more idealism
and optimism on the student campus than we do in other communities.
This is directly related to the search for understanding, truth, and the
tremendous energy of young people caught up in this process."



H. Douglas Sessoms



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Clemson. S.C,
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Needham. Mass.
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Online LibraryUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillYackety yack [serial] (Volume 1967) → online text (page 23 of 31)