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Index to the world's greatest literature : comprising a summary of the series, a general index, a subject index, an index of authors, and a chronological index online

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LIBRARY

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA.

SANTA BARBARA

PRESENTED BY

MRS. THOMAS M. STORKE



WotW* <Z$rtateat literature



THE Masterpieces of the World's Greatest
Authors in History, Biography, Philosophy,
Economics, Politics; Epic and Dramatic
Literature, History of English Literature, Oriental
Literature (Sacred and Profane], Orations, Essays.
Sixty-one Crown Octavo Volumes :: :: ::



ILLUSTRATED WITH FRONTISPIECES, EACH A MASTER
WORK OF ART IN PORTRAITURE OR HISTORIC PAINTING



Cbitors



LIBRARY COMMITTEE
JUSTIN MCCARTHY, M.P.

Historian and Journalist

TIMOTHY D WIGHT, D.D., LL.D

Ejc-President Yale University

RICHARD HENRY STODDARD
A. uthor and Critic

PAUL VAN DYKE, D.D.

Princeton University

ALBERT ELLERY BERGH

Managing Editor

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

JOHN T. MORGAN

United States Senate

FREDERIC R. COUDERT, LL.D.

New York Bar

EDWARD EVERETT HALF

A uthor and Editor

MAURICE FRANCIS EGAN, LL.D.

Catholic University of America

JULIAN HAWTHORNE

Literary Editor



INDEX

O

TO

THE WORLD'S GREATEST
LITERATURE



COMPRISING

A SUMMARY OF THE SERIES, A GEN

ERAL INDEX, A SUBJECT INDEX, AN

INDEX OF AUTHORS, AND A

CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX



Compiled by an Editorial Corps of Expert Indexers



REVISED EDITION




NEW YORK
P. F. COLLIER 6f SON



COPYRIGHT, 1902
BY THE COLONIAL PRESS



SPECIAL INTRODUCTION



Though index learning turns no student pale,
It holds the eel of science by the tail.

POPE



THE old problem of the limit of human progress,
whether with the advance of learning so much time
will have to be devoted to acquiring the knowledge of
the past that the student will die of old age before he is ready
to make to it any contributions of his own, has developed from
a purely academic proposition into a very practical and indeed
acute issue. What the ultimate solution will be we can not
foresee ; the best we can do is to postpone, so far as possible,
the day when the period for original research shall begin
to shorten, by inventions for reducing the time and labor
needed in mastering the essentials of existing knowledge.

One of the most useful devices of this sort is the analytic
subject index, which is now supplanting in all important books
the old form of the index, that consists merely of an alpha-
betical list of proper names, with no other reference than to
the pages on which they occur. In the analytic index, not
only names of persons, places, etc., but all subjects treated
in the work, generic ideas as well as specific themes, are
entered, and in the case of each reference a clear statement
is made of the particular phase of the subject treated. In
this way the index not only directs the student to all the in-
formation of which he is in search, but provides the parts of
a scheme for classification when he shall come to synthesize
his selected material. The function performed is of such
great and obvious assistance in the rapid and thorough assimi-
lation of knowledge that it has often been compared to pre-
digestion. This implies, however, that there has been a change
in the nature or application of the elements of information,
which is not the case. It is at the most mastication, a separa-
tion of the elements preparing for and inviting the operations

Index 1



iv SPECIAL INTRODUCTION

which the student's own mind must supply, if he would really
make the knowledge a part of his intellectual being.

While each of the four large indexes of the present vol-
ume the General Index, the Subject Index, the Index of
Authors, and the Chronological Index is analytical in its
construction, it is the first one, the General Index, that em-
bodies most fully and thoroughly the idea. In this index
alone the reader will find a detailed analytical guide to all the
essential principles and facts in the various subjects of the
series History, Biography, Philosophy, Economics, Politics,
Literature, Criticism, and Oratory. By it the sixty volumes
of the series are made available as an encyclopedia more ac-
curate, authoritative, and exhaustive than can be claimed of
any work of equal size that has been builded on a different
principle.

As a proof of this statement, and as an illustration of the
method of using the index for a few of its many purposes, the
following treatment of the subject "War" is presented:

The theme is referred to in twenty-nine of the sixty volumes
of the series. In its general philosophic and legal aspects
"War" is discussed in volume one of "American Orators,"
volume two of "British Essayists," volumes one and two of
"British Orators," "Chinese Literature," volumes one and two
of de Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," "Demosthenes'
Orations," volume one of Carlyle's "French Revolution," vol-
ume two of von Ranke's "History of the Popes," Sir Thomas
More's "Utopia " and Campanella's "City of the Sun" in
"Ideal Commonwealths," volume one of Hallam's "Middle
Ages," Bagehot's "Physics and Politics," volumes one and
two of Mill's "Political Economy," Aristotle's "Politics,"
Plato's "Republic," and Montesquieu's "Spirit of Laws."
Here we find references to the conclusions of the master minds
of all ages and countries on such important phases of the
subject as the doctrine of civil war, its justification, its
dangers, its cost, etc. ; progress in the arts of war ; relation
of war to religion ; armaments as an assurance of peace ; effect
of war on democratic government, especially in America;
causes and motives of war, such as geographical conditions,
desire of personal aggrandizement, annexation of territory;
methods of financing a war; the Hindu view of war; the
right of private war; beneficial effects of war on society;
relation of ethics to war; economic effects of war; the



SPECIAL INTRODUCTION v

place of war in an ideal state; relation of war to historic
civilization.

His is a dull mind indeed who does not see in this un-
ordered, but not entangled, array of ideas a wealth of ma-
terial which he can easily rearrange to suit a specific purpose,
whether this be to prepare an oration for Memorial Day, an
economic or philosophic essay, or a Utopian romance.

Specific wars are referred to in the following volumes:
volume two of "American Orators," Rawlinson's "Ancient
History," volume two of "British Essayists," volumes one and
two of "British Orators," Creasy's "Decisive Battles of the
World," "Demosthenes' Orations," "Egyptian Literature,"
volume one of Carlyle's "French Revolution," volume three
of Green's "History of the English People," volume two of
von Ranke's "History of the Popes," volumes one and two
of Hallam's "Middle Ages," Michelet's "Modern History,"
and Hegel's "Philosophy of History." Every important war
of ancient, medieval, and modern times has its references,
some of which are to political and philosophical reflections
upon the causes, results, justification, etc., of the wars, and
some to military accounts of notable campaigns. When the
entries of particular battles such as Blenheim and Waterloo
are consulted, the work will be found to be unusually rich
in graphic descriptions, and as such an inspiration not only
to the orator, the essayist, and the novelist, but also to the
poet and even to the painter and the musician. Robert
Southey's poem, the "Battle of Blenheim," Lady Butler's
painting "Quatre Bras," and Rouget de Lisle's song the
"Marseillaise," are artistic expressions of ideas and ideals
susceptible of endless repetition and infinite variation, for of
such sentiments as humanity and heroism and patriotism the
human heart never tires. History and philosophy and litera-
ture are full of suggestions for fresh embodiments of these
immortal motives, and even if the reader does not commit
his ideas to writing he may still share in the author's in-
tellectual and spiritual delight of original conception.

The Subject Index is constructed on the plan of the Gen-
eral Index, with a far broader classification. It also serves as
a table of contents of the entire series, and is, therefore,
supplementary to the tabulated Summary of the Series which
precedes the General Index.

The Index of Authors is an alphabetical list of all the



vi SPECIAL INTRODUCTION

writers represented in the series. The large number of these,
five hundred and nineteen, is the best of all indications of the
wide scope of the collection. The foreign representation is
unusually large, owing to the inclusion in the series of many
masterpieces of Oriental literature here presented for the first
time in an English translation.

The Chronological Index gives tabulated reference to the
years in which those events occurred which are described or
mentioned in the work. These occurrences are grouped in the
various divisions of Literature, Law and Political Economy,
Philosophy and Religion, and History.

It is earnestly recommended that the reader make an
ineffaceable mental note of the nature and uses of these in-
dexes, rendering as they do the whole work readily available
as an encyclopedia of general reference, a handbook of
quotations, a treasury of literary suggestions, a biographical
dictionary, and a manual of classified dates.



CONTENTS

PAGE

SUMMARY OF THE SERIES viii

LIST OF TITLES USED IN INDEX ..... xvi

INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS ...... xvii

GENERAL INDEX ........ i

SUBJECT INDEX ........ 381

INDEX OF AUTHORS ....... 427

CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX ...... 445

LITERATURE .... . 447

LAW AND POLITICAL ECONOMY .... 467

ORATORY ........ 470

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION ..... 476

HISTORY 484



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tions.
Book II. History of Persia.
Book III. History of Greece.
Book IV. History of Macedonia.
Book V. History of Rome and Parthia.


Book I. History of France.
Book II. The Feudal System.
Book III. History of Italy.
Book IV. History of Spain.
Book V. History of Germany.
Book VI. History of the Greeks and Sara
Book VII. History of Ecclesiastical Powe
Book VIII. The Constitutional History of
land.
Book IX. Society dnring the Middle Ages.


First Period, 1453-1517.
Second Period, 1517-1648.
Third Period, 1648-1789.


The English Kingdoms, 607-1013.
England under Foreign Kings, 1013-1204.
The Great Charter, 1204-1265.
The Three Edwards, 1265-1360.
The Hundred Years' War, 1336-1431.
The New Monarchy, 1422-1540.
The Reformation.
Puritan England.
The Revolution.
Modern England.


Fourteen Lectures on the History of Ext
Events of the Political and Social Woi
Europe. From the Fall of the Roman
pire to 1830.




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on to the Battle of
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The Constitution.
The Guillotine.


From the Battle o
Waterloo, suppl<
of the Battles of
and Manila.


A treatise exhibiti
Laws of Differe
and Social Circi
cation to Civic
Politics.


The Preliminary J
The Useof Confli
Nation-making.
The Age of Discu
Verified Progress


Book I. Productic
Book II. Distribu
Book HI. Exchar
Book IV. Influen<
on Production a
Book V. On the I


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Pro.tagoras.


A treatise on the E
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dvancement of Learning:
and Classification of the kxi
show the necessity of advan
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r ovum Organum : Book I.
pretation of Nature and the
ook II. On the Interpretati
the Reign of Man.


Transcendental Doctrine of
[. Transcendental Doctrine c


art I. The Oriental World,
art II. The Greek World,
art III. The Roman World,
art IV. The German World.


rom "The First Philippic,
tween 351 B.C. and 341 B.C.,
on the Crown," 330 B.C.


rom " First Oration again:
livered 63 B.C., to the "Oral
cution of Verres,"


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rom Samuel Adams, 1732,
Ireland.


rom Michel Eyquem de Mi
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Albert ElleryBergh.


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J. Scott Clark.


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Epiphanius Wilson.


Epiphanius Wilson.


Epiphanius Wilson.


Epiphanius Wilson.


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William Archer.
Leonie Gilmour.

Henry Van Laun.


James Atkinson.
Edward Fitzgerald.
Herman Bicknell.
James Ross.


Suyematz Kenchio.
B. H. Chamberlain.
B. H. Chamberlain.


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Etienne Delecluse
and Epiphanius
Wilson.
J. D. Carlyle.
Various translators,
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Sophocles.
Euripides.
Aristophanes.


Pedro Calderoi
Jean-Baptiste
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Jean-Baptiste


cine.
Oliver Goldsm
Johann Wolf
von Goethe.
Richard Bri
Sheridan.
Friedrich von !


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Prometheus Bound.

(Edipus Rex.
Medea.
The Knights.


Life a Dream.
The Misanthrope.


Phaedra.


She Stoops to Conquel
Faust.


The Rivals.
Mary Stuart.


A Doll's House.
Les Pattes de Mouche.

Book I. The Source.
Book II. The Renaiis
Book III. The Classic


The Shah Nameh.
The Rubaiyit.
The Divan.
The Gulistan.


Genji Monogatari.
Japanese Poems.
Japanese Dramas.


Book of Good Counsel
Nala and Damayanti.
The Rantayana.
Sakoontali.


Poems.

Analects.
Sayings.
The Shi- King.
Travels of F4-Hien.
Sorrows of Han.


Romance of Antar.


Arabian Poems.
Arabian Nights.
The number of pages ii


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Translator.


F. Max Muller.
James Darmestetter.
Max Muller.
Max Muller.
George Sale.
Samuel Beal.


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C. C. Starkweather.
M. Devic and C. C.
Starkweather.
Aristide Marre and
C. C. Stark-
weather.


Aristide Marre and
C. C. Stark-
weather.


E. A. Wallis Budge.
William Flanders
Petrie.
C. W. Goodwin.

Various Egyptolo-
gists.


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gists.
Various Egyptolo-
gists.
C. R. Conder.


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Synopsis of


Vedic Hymns.
Zend Avesta.
Dhammapada.
Upanishads.
The Koran.
Life of Buddha.


Moorish Ballads.
Moorish Romances.
Story of Sidi Braham of 1
Five Berber Stories.
Poems of the Maghreb.
Popular Tales of the Ber
Popular Tales of the K.al


The Epic of Bidasari.
Sedjaret Malayou.
Legends of the Malay Ai


The Princess Djouher-M


MakotaRadja-Radja; 01


The Book of the Dead.
Egyptian Tales.


Epic of Penta-our.
Hymns and Invocations.


Cuneiform Inscriptions.
Hieratic Papyri.


Tell Amarna Tablets.


Turkish Fables.
The Magistrates.
Ottoman Poems.
Counsels of Nabi Efendi
The Ascension of Mahon
The Rose and the Nighti
History of the Forty Ver




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The Talmud.
The Kabbalah Unveiled.

Hebrew Melodies.


Epic of Ishtar and Izdubar.
Tablet* and Cuneiform Inscriptiol


Proverbs and Folklore.
The Vacant Yard.
Armenian Poems.
David of Sassun.
The Ruined Family.


Comprising Chronicles of Franc
Scotland, Spain, Brittany, Ga
ders, and other countries.


Comprising an Abridgment of th
Sweden and a Complete Accou
reer and Wars of Charles XII.


Frtnch Mtmoirs: The Fall of Bu
Turbulent Times at Court.


Sidelights on the Reign of Henri 1
Rochelle and the Great Cabal.
The Eclipse of Mazarin.
The Triumph of Madame de Mail


Court Life under Louis XIV.
Memoirs of Marie Antoinette.


An Autobiographical Sketch.
From Consul to Emperor.



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