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a specified way, it is not said it will never be accepted in any other
way.

The movements by State action for emancipation in several of the States
not included in the emancipation proclamation are matters of profound
gratulation. And while I do not repeat in detail what I have heretofore
so earnestly urged upon this subject, my general views and feelings
remain unchanged; and I trust that Congress will omit no fair
opportunity of aiding these important steps to a great consummation.

In the midst of other cares, however important, we must not lose sight
of the fact that the war power is still our main reliance. To that power
alone can we look yet for a time to give confidence to the people in the
contested regions that the insurgent power will not again overrun them.
Until that confidence shall be established little can be done anywhere
for what is called reconstruction. Hence our chiefest care must still be
directed to the Army and Navy, who have thus far borne their harder part
so nobly and well; and it may be esteemed fortunate that in giving the
greatest efficiency to these indispensable arms we do also honorably
recognize the gallant men, from commander to sentinel, who compose them,
and to whom more than to others the world must stand indebted for the
home of freedom disenthralled, regenerated, enlarged, and perpetuated.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.




SPECIAL MESSAGES.


WASHINGTON, D.C., _December 8, 1863_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

In conformity to the law of July 16, 1862, I most cordially recommend
that Captain John Rodgers, United States Navy, receive a vote of thanks
from Congress for the eminent skill and gallantry exhibited by him in
the engagement with the rebel armed ironclad steamer _Fingal_, alias
_Atlanta_, whilst in command of the United States ironclad steamer
_Weehawken_, which led to her capture on the 17th June, 1863, and also
for the zeal, bravery, and general good conduct shown by this officer on
many occasions.

This recommendation is specially made in order to comply with the
requirements of the ninth section of the aforesaid act, which is in the
following words, viz:

That any line officer of the Navy or Marine Corps may be advanced one
grade if upon recommendation of the President by name he receives the
thanks of Congress for highly distinguished conduct in conflict with the
enemy or for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, D.C., _December 8, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

Congress, on my recommendation, passed a resolution, approved 7th
February, 1863, tendering its thanks to Commander D.D. Porter "for the
bravery and skill displayed in the attack on the post of Arkansas on the
10th January, 1863," and in consideration of those services, together
with his efficient labors and vigilance subsequently displayed in
thwarting the efforts of the rebels to obstruct the Mississippi and its
tributaries and the important part rendered by the squadron under his
command, which led to the surrender of Vicksburg.

I do therefore, in conformity to the seventh section of the act approved
16th July, 1862, nominate Commander D.D. Porter to be a rear-admiral in
the Navy on the active list from the 4th July, 1863, to fill an existing
vacancy.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _December 10, 1863_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report, dated the 9th instant, with the
accompanying papers, received from the Secretary of State in compliance
with the requirements of the sixteenth and eighteenth sections of the
act entitled "An act to regulate the diplomatic and consular systems of
the United States," approved August 18, 1856.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded at Le Roy, Kans., on the 29th day of August, 1863, between
William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and William G. Coffin,
superintendent of Indian affairs of the southern superintendency,
commissioners on the part of the United States, and the chiefs and
headmen of the Great and Little Osage tribe of Indians of the State of
Kansas.

A communication from the Secretary of the Interior, dated the 12th
instant, accompanies the treaty.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded on the 7th day of October, 1863, at Conejos, Colorado
Territory, between John Evans, governor and _ex officio_ superintendent
of Indian affairs of said Territory; Michael Steck, superintendent of
Indian affairs for the Territory of New Mexico; Simeon Whitely and
Lafayette Head, Indian agents, commissioners on the part of the United
States, and the chiefs and warriors of the Tabeguache band of Utah
Indians.

I also transmit a report of the Secretary of the Interior of the 12th
instant, submitting the treaty; an extract from the last annual report
of Governor Evans, of Colorado Territory, relating to its negotiation,
and a map upon which is delineated the boundaries of the country ceded
by the Indians and that retained for their own use.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded at the city of Washington on the 6th day of April, 1863,
between John P. Usher, commissioner on the part of the United States,
and the chiefs and headmen of the Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache tribes of
Indians, duly authorized thereto.

A letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 12th instant
accompanies the treaty.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded at the Sac and Fox Agency, in Kansas, on the 2d day of
September, 1863, between William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian
Affairs, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the New York
Indians, represented by duly authorized members of the bands of said
tribe.

A letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 12th instant
accompanies the treaty.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded at the Sac and Fox Agency, in Kansas, on the 3d day of
September, 1863, between William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian
Affairs, and William G. Coffin, superintendent of Indian affairs for the
southern superintendency, on the part of the United States, and the
Creek Nation of Indians, represented by its chiefs.

A letter from the Secretary of the Interior, dated the 12th instant,
accompanies the treaty.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, December, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty
concluded at the Sac and Fox Agency, in Kansas, on the 4th day of
September, 1863, between William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian
Affairs, and Henry W. Martin, agent for the Sacs and Foxes,
commissioners on the part of the United States, and the united tribes of
Sac and Fox Indians of the Mississippi.

A letter from the Secretary of the Interior, dated the 12th instant,
accompanies the treaty.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _December 15, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In answer to the resolution of the Senate of the 11th of March last,
requesting certain information touching persons in the service of this
Government, I transmit a report from the Secretary of State, to whom the
resolution was referred.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _December 17, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit to the Senate, for consideration with a view to its
ratification, a convention between the United States and Her Britannic
Majesty for the final adjustment of the claims of the Hudsons Bay and
Pugets Sound Agricultural Companies, signed in this city on the 1st day
of July last (1863).

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



DECEMBER 17, 1863.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States_:

Herewith I lay before you a letter addressed to myself by a committee of
gentlemen representing the freedmen's aid societies in Boston, New York,
Philadelphia, and Cincinnati. The subject of the letter, as indicated
above, is one of great magnitude and importance, and one which these
gentlemen, of known ability and high character, seem to have considered
with great attention and care. Not having the time to form a mature
judgment of my own as to whether the plan they suggest is the best, I
submit the whole subject to Congress, deeming that their attention
thereto is almost imperatively demanded.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _December 22, 1863_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit to the Senate, for its consideration with a view to
ratification, two conventions between the United States and His Belgian
Majesty, signed at Brussels on the 20th May and the 20th of July last,
respectively, and both relating to the extinguishment of the Scheldt
dues, etc. A copy of so much of the correspondence between the Secretary
of State and Mr. Sanford, the minister resident of the United States at
Brussels, on the subject of the conventions as is necessary to a full
understanding of it is also herewith transmitted.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _December 23, 1863_

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit to Congress a copy of the report to the Secretary of State of
the commissioners on the part of the United States under the convention
with Peru of the 12th of January last, on the subject of claims. It will
be noticed that two claims of Peruvian citizens on this Government have
been allowed. An appropriation for the discharge of the obligations of
the United States in these cases is requested.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



JANUARY 5, 1864.

_Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives_:

By a joint resolution of your honorable bodies approved December 23,
1863, the paying of bounties to veteran volunteers, as now practiced by
the War Department, is, to the extent of $300 in each case, prohibited
after this 5th day of the present month. I transmit for your
consideration a communication from the Secretary of War, accompanied by
one from the Provost-Marshal-General to him, both relating to the
subject above mentioned. I earnestly recommend that the law be so
modified as to allow bounties to be paid as they now are, at least until
the ensuing 1st day of February.

I am not without anxiety lest I appear to be importunate in thus
recalling your attention to a subject upon which you have so recently
acted, and nothing but a deep conviction that the public interest
demands it could induce me to incur the hazard of being misunderstood on
this point. The Executive approval was given by me to the resolution
mentioned, and it is now by a closer attention and a fuller knowledge of
facts that I feel constrained to recommend a reconsideration of the
subject.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _January 7_

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit to Congress a copy of the decree of the court of the United
States for the southern district of New York, awarding the sum of
$17,150.66 for the illegal capture of the British schooner _Glen_,
and request that an appropriation of that amount may be made as an
indemnification to the parties interested.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, January, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I herewith lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon
the following-described treaties, viz:

A treaty made at Fort Bridger, Utah Territory, on the 2d day of July,
1863, between the United States and the chiefs, principal men, and
warriors of the eastern bands of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians.

A treaty made at Box Elder, Utah Territory, on the 30th day of July,
1863, between the United States and the chiefs and warriors of the
northwestern bands of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians.

A treaty made at Ruby Valley, Nevada Territory, on the 1st day of
October, 1863, between the United States and the chiefs, principal men,
and warriors of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians.

A treaty made at Tuilla Valley, Utah Territory, on the 12th day of
October, 1863, between the United States and the chiefs, principal men,
and warriors of the Goship bands of Shoshonee Indians.

A treaty made at Soda Springs, in Idaho Territory, on the 14th day of
October, 1863, between the United States and the chiefs of the mixed
bands of Bannacks and Shoshonees, occupying the valley of the Shoshonee
River.

A letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 5th instant, a copy of
a report of the 30th ultimo, from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, a
copy of a communication from Governor Doty, superintendent of Indian
Affairs, Utah Territory, dated November 10, 1863, relating to the
Indians parties to the several treaties herein named, and a map,
furnished by that gentleman, are herewith transmitted.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, January, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I herewith lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon,
a treaty made at the Old Crossing of Red Lake River, in the State of
Minnesota, on the 2d day of October, 1863, between Alexander Ramsey and
Ashley C. Morrill, commissioners on the part of the United States, and
the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of the Red Lake and Pembina bands of
Chippewa Indians.

A letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 8th instant, together
with a communication from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the 5th
instant and copies of Mr. Ramsey's report and journal, relating to the
treaty, and a map showing the territory ceded, are herewith transmitted.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_January 12, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In accordance with the request of the Senate conveyed in their
resolution of the 16th of December, 1863, desiring any information in my
possession relative to the alleged exceptional treatment of Kansas
troops when captured by those in rebellion, I have the honor to transmit
a communication from the Secretary of War, accompanied by reports from
the General in Chief of the Army and the Commissary-General of Prisoners
relative to the subject-matter of the resolution.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



JANUARY 20, 1864.

_Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives_:

In accordance with a letter addressed by the Secretary of State, with my
approval, to the Hon. Joseph A. Wright, of Indiana, that patriotic and
distinguished gentleman repaired to Europe and attended the
International Agricultural Exhibition, held at Hamburg last year, and
has since his return made a report to me, which, it is believed, can not
fail to be of general interest, and especially so to the agricultural
community. I transmit for your consideration copies of the letters and
report. While it appears by the letter that no reimbursement of expenses
or compensation was promised him, I submit whether reasonable allowance
should not be made him for them.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _January 21, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of yesterday, respecting
the recent destruction by fire of the Church of the Compañía at
Santiago, Chile, and the efforts of citizens of the United States to
rescue the victims of the conflagration, I transmit a report from the
Secretary of State, with the papers accompanying it.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _January 23, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit to the Senate a copy of a dispatch of the 12th of April last,
addressed by Anson Burlingame, esq., the minister of the United States
to China, to the Secretary of State, relative to a modification of the
twenty-first article of a treaty between the United States and China of
the 18th of June, 1858, a printed copy of which is also herewith
transmitted.

These papers are submitted to the consideration of the Senate with a
view to their advice and consent being given to the modification of the
said twenty-first article, as explained in the said dispatch and its
accompaniments.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _January 29, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, in answer to
the resolution of the Senate respecting the correspondence with the
authorities of Great Britain in relation to the proposed pursuit of
hostile bands of the Sioux Indians into the Hudson Bay territories.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 4, 1864_.

_To the Senate_:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 26th ultimo,
requesting "a copy of all the correspondence between the authorities of
the United States and the rebel authorities on the exchange of
prisoners, and the different propositions connected with that subject,"
I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of War and the papers
with which it is accompanied.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 5, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In answer to the resolution of the Senate of yesterday on the subject of
a reciprocity treaty with the Sandwich Islands, I transmit a report from
the Secretary of State, to whom the resolution was referred.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 16, 1864_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit to Congress a report from the Secretary of State, with the
accompanying papers, relative to the claim on this Government of the
owners of the French ship _La Manche_, and recommend an appropriation
for the satisfaction of the claim, pursuant to the award of the
arbitrators.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 16, 1864_.

_To the House of Representatives of the United States_:

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 8th
instant, requesting information touching the arrest of the United States
consul-general to the British North American Provinces, and certain
official communications respecting Canadian commerce, I transmit a
report from the Secretary of State and the documents by which it was
accompanied.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 22, 1864_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit to Congress the copy of a correspondence which has recently
taken place between Her Britannic Majesty's minister accredited to this
Government and the Secretary of State, in order that the expediency of
sanctioning the acceptance by the master of the American schooner
_Highlander_ of a present of a watch which the lords of the committee of
Her Majesty's privy council for trade propose to present to him in
recognition of services rendered by him to the crew of the British
vessel _Pearl_ may be taken into consideration.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I communicate to the Senate herewith, for its constitutional action
thereon, the articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at
the city of Washington on the 25th day of the present month by and
between William P. Dole, as commissioner on the part of the United
States, and the duly authorized delegates of the Swan Creek and Black
River Chippewas and the Munsees or Christian Indians in Kansas.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _February 29, 1864_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 26th
instant, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of War,
relative to the reenlistment of veteran volunteers.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION,

_Washington, February 29, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I nominate Ulysses S. Grant, now a major-general in the military
service, to be lieutenant-general in the Army of the United States.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report[11] of the Secretary of the Interior of the
11th instant, containing the information requested in Senate resolution
of the 29th ultimo.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

[Footnote 11: Relating to the amount of money received for the sale of
the Wea trust lands in Kansas, etc.]



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 9, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 1st instant,
respecting the points of commencement of the Union Pacific Railroad,
on the one hundredth degree of west longitude, and of the branch road,
from the western boundary of Iowa to the said one hundredth degree of
longitude, I transmit the accompanying report from the Secretary of
the Interior, containing the information called for.

I deem it proper to add that on the 17th day of November last an
Executive order was made upon this subject and delivered to the
vice-president of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, which fixed the
point on the western boundary of the State of Iowa from which the
company should construct their branch road to the one hundredth degree
of west longitude, and declared it to be within the limits of the
township in Iowa opposite the town of Omaha, in Nebraska. Since then
the company has represented to me that upon actual surveys made it has
determined upon the precise point of departure of their said branch
road from the Missouri River, and located the same as described in the
accompanying report of the Secretary of the Interior, which point is
within the limits designated in the order of November last; and inasmuch
as that order is not of record in any of the Executive Departments, and
the company having desired a more definite one, I have made the order
of which a copy is herewith, and caused the same to be filed in the
Department of the Interior.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE OFFICE, _March 12, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In obedience to the resolution of the Senate of the 28th of January
last, I communicate herewith a report, with accompanying papers, from
the Secretary of the Interior, showing what portion of the
appropriations for the colonization of persons of African descent has
been expended and the several steps which have been taken for the
execution of the acts of Congress on that subject.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _March 14, 1864_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit to Congress a copy of a treaty between the United States and
Great Britain for the final settlement of the claims of the Hudsons Bay
and Pugets Sound Agricultural Companies, concluded on the 1st of July
last, the ratifications of which were exchanged in this city on the 5th
instant, and recommend an appropriation to carry into effect the first,
second, and third articles thereof.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



WASHINGTON, _March 14, 1864_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

On the 25th day of November, 1862, a convention for the mutual
adjustment of claims pending between the United States and Ecuador was
signed at Quito by the plenipotentiaries of the contracting parties.
A copy is herewith inclosed.

This convention, already ratified by this Government, has been sent
to Quito for the customary exchange of ratifications, which it is not
doubted will be promptly effected. As the stipulations of the instrument
require that the commissioners who are to be appointed pursuant to its
provisions shall meet at Guayaquil within ninety days after such
exchange, it is desirable that the legislation necessary to give effect
to the convention on the part of the United States should anticipate the
usual course of proceeding.

I therefore invite the early attention of Congress to the subject.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.



EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

_Washington, March 22, 1864_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I herewith lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon,
a treaty made and concluded in Washington City on the 18th instant by
and between William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and the



Online LibraryUnknownA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 6, part 1: Abraham Lincoln → online text (page 22 of 33)