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National Fish and Wildlife Foundation reauthorization : hearing before the Subcommittee on Environment and Natural Resources of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on reauthorizing the National Fish and Wildlife Foundat online

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September 30, 1992, and $54,010 at



139,981


$ 7,764


$ —


$ 147,745


$ 92,165


909,249


9,253,388


110,892


10,273,529


8,965,037


,772,484


(3,762,484)


(10,000)








41.692


326.820





368,512


165,017





4,958,000





4,958,000


4,863,000



4,863,406



15,747,786



15.323



September 30, 1991
Donated land (Note 6)

Marketable securities (Note 2)


128,405


-


2,455,838


128,405
2,455,838


99,232
951,000

2,268,612


Total noncurrent assets


143,728


-


2,455.838


2.599.566


3,326,844


Total assets


$5,007,134


$10,783,488


$2,556,730


$18,347,352


$17,412,063



LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES:
Liabilities —
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Project liabilities (Note 10)

Total liabilities

Fund balances —
Designated for project commitments

(Note 10)
Undesignated

Total fund balances

Total liabilities and fund balances



$ 160.940
14.440


$ 10,194
2,695,502


$ —


$ 171,134
2,709.942


$ 50,712
3,749,535


175.380


2,705.696


-


2.881,076


3,800,247


4.831.754


5,618,158
2,459,634


2.556,730


5,618,158
9,848,118


3,689,011
9,922,805


4.831,754


8,077,792


2,556,730


15,466,276


13,611,816


$5,007,134


$10,783,488


$2,556,730


$18,347,352


$17,412,063



The accompanying notes z



iiegral part of this balance sheet.



96



Statements of Support, Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances



For the Year Ended September 30. 1992

(With Summarized Totals for the Year Ended September 30, 1991)



Operating Funds



Unrestricted Restricted



Endowment
Funds



SUPPORT AND REVENUES (Notes 1 and 2):
U.S. government funds —

U.S. government matching contribution
(Notes 1 and 11)

Grants /cooperative agreements
Public support (Notes 1 and 2) —

Stamp and print program (Note 7)

Direct contributions

Contributed services (Notes 2 and 4)
Other revenues —

Investment income

Management fees and other

Total support and revenues



EXPENSES:
Projects and grants (Note 10)
General and administrative
Contributed services (Notes 2 and 4)
Fund-raising

Total expenses

SUPPORT AND REVENLIES IN EXCESS OF
EXPENSES

FLIND BALANCES, beginning of year

Fund transfers (Note 2)

FUND BALANCES, end of year



$ —


$ 4,958.000


$ —


$ 4.958.000


$ 6.181.021


586


441.501





442,087


238.713


65,739








65,739


333,528


761,006


7,183,255





7,944,261


11,703,126


31,704


173,390





205,094


634,925


58.139


330,189


187.566


575.894


751,870


76.268


4,286





80,554


41,022


993,4i2


13.090,621


187.566


14,271.629


19,884,205


302,165


11.400.124




11.702,289


17.439.301


241,014








241,014


119,546


31,704


173.390





205,094


634,925


268,772








268,772


300,606


843.655


1 1.573.514


-


12,417,169


18,494,378


149.787


1.517,107


187,566


1,854,460


1,389,827


4.893,019


6,349,633


2.369.164


13,611,816


12,221.989


(211,052)


211.052


-


-


-


$4,831,754


$ 8,077,792


$2,556,730


$15,466,276


$13,611,816



The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement,



Notes to Financial Statements



As of September 30. 1992 and 1991



97



1. FORMATION AND PURPOSE:

On March 26. 1984. by an act of law (the
■*Aa"), the U.S. Congress established the
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (the
"Foundation") as a charitable and non-
profit corporation which is not an agency
or establishment of the United States. The
purposes of the Foundation are (1) to
encourage, accept, and administer private
gifts of property for the benefit of, or in
connection with, the activities and services
of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and
(2) to undertake and conduct such other
activities as will further the conservation
and management of the fish, wildlife and
plant resources of the United States, its
territories and its possessions, for present
and future generations of Americans.

For the ten-year p>eriod beginning on
Oaober 1, 1984. under the provisions of
the Act, funds were authorized to be
appropriated to the Department of the
Interior (not to exceed $i,(XX),(X)0) to be
made available to the Foundation (1) to
match, on a one-for-one basis, private
contributions made to the Foundation and
(2) to provide administrative services, as
defined.

In 1987, Congress passed S.1389 which
expanded the Foundation's authority by
raising the cap on Federal matching funds
to $5.0(X),0(X) a year for 1988 through
1993. thus enabling the Foundation to
spend Federal funds abroad and clarif>'ing
the Foundation's role in acquiring lands
with Federal funds. This bill was signed by
the President on January 11, 1988. creating
P.L. 100240.

On July 11. 1990, Congress passed H.R.
3338 revising the cap on Federal matching
funds to $15,000,000 for 1991, $20,000,000
for 1992, and $25,000,000 for 1993-
Additionally, this amendment prevents the
Foundation from using these matching
funds for administrative expenses. This
bill was signed by the President on
November 9. 1990. creating P.L. 101593-
Congress appropriated $5,000,000 of the
available $15.000.0{X) in matching funds
for its fiscal year 1992 budget.

In fiscal year 1993, the Foundation will



petition Congress for reauthorization
(original authorization expires on October

1, 1994) and an increase in its appropria-
tion to $10,000,000. Management expects
the authorization to be renewed because
of the success of the Foundation's pro-
grams and a favorable relationship with
Congress.

2. SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTING
POUCIES:

A summary of the significant accounting
policies followed by the Foundation is set
fortli below.

Basis of Presentation

The financial statements are prepared on
the accrual basis of accounting.

1991 Financial Information

The financial information shown for 1991
(summarized totals only) in the accompa-
nying financial statements is included to
provide a basis for compari.son with the
totals for 1992. Certain 1991 balances have
been reclassified in order to be compa-
rable to the 1992 presentation.

Investments

Investments are carried at the lower of
cost or market value. At September 30,

1992 and 1S)91. the Foundation's invest-
ments consisted of shon-term cash
equivalents and marketable debt and
equity securities. The investments had a
total cost of $12,729,368 and $11,233,649
and a market value of $12,927,792 and
$11,360,470, respectively, at that date.

Support and Revenues

Contributions, other than those designated
by donors for restricted purpo.ses, are
considered to be available for unrestriaed
use. Unless otherwise designated by the
donor, investment income earned on
restricted contributions is credited to the
unrestricted fund.

Contributed Services

The value of certain services provided to,
and/ or paid on behalf of, the Foundation



that is susceptible to objective measure-
ment or valuation has been reflected in
the financial statements (see Note 4).

Fund Transfers

The Foundation, at its discretion, may
designate unrestricted funds for restricted
programs or for the establishment of
endowment funds (see Note 5)-

3. INCOME TAXES:

The Foundation is exempt from Federal
income taxes under Section 501(c)C3) of
the Internal Revenue Code. Accordingly,
no provision for income taxes is reflected
in the accompanying financial statements.
The Internal Revenue Service has granted
the Foundation exemption from private
foundation status.

4. CONTRIBUTED SERVICES:

At its inception, the Foundation received
contributed services and facilities from the
Department of the Interior. Begiruiing in
1989, the Foundation began quarterly
payments to the Department of the
Interior for rent, supplies, phone, and
fxjstage. The Foundation began reimburs-
ing the Department of the Interior for legal
services in April 1990. No contributed
services were received from the Depart-
ment of Interior during 1992 and 1991

During 1992 and 1991. the Foundation
received contributed services ft^om several
outside sources to assist with specific
programs and/or the general purpose of
the Foundation. These amounts are
recorded in the accompanying financial
statements at $205,094 in 1992 and
$634,925 in 1991.

5. ENDOWMENT FUNDS:

In 1987, the Foundation established the
Fund for the Future, an endowment fund,
from unrestricted funds. Investment
income from this endowment is to be
used to support the Foundation's future
operations and projects. Corpus from the
Fund for the Future is not to be invaded
without specific, unanimous passage by



98



the Board of Direaors. At September 30,
1992 and 1991. the balance in this
endowment tiind totaled $2,445,839 and
$2,258,612, respectively,

Other endowment fUnds include the
Francoise TrefFel-Gianoulsos Wildlife Trust
Fund which was established in 1985 with
a donor contribution and the Grizzly Bear
Endowment Fund which was established
in 1987 with revenues from the Print
Program.

6. DONATED LAND AND EASEMENT:

In December 1987, the Foundation
received a donation of an easement
bordering the Beaverkill River in upstate
New York. No value has been given to
this easement in the accompanying
fmanciai statements because there is no
objective basis for determining its value,

Additionally in 1989, the Foundation
received donations of approximately 2.241
acres of land located in South Carolina,
known as Warren and Big Islands. These
donations were recorded at the fair market
value of the land based on independent
appraisals of the properties in October
1988. Thisland was valued at $951,000,
During fiscal year 1992. the Foundation
donated these tracks of land to tlie state of
South Carolina in accordance with the
provisions of the agreement with the
original donor.The book value contribu-
tion of the donated land is included in
1992 project and grant expense.

7. STAMP AND PRINT PROGRAM:

In 1987, the Foundation entered into a
five-year agreement with a contractor to
produce and distribute art prints and
stamps to raise money for the Foundation.
The contractor, in addition to paying
printer royalties to the Foundation, will
bear all costs and responsibilities for
producing, packaging, promoting, and
selling the regular-edition prints, including
the payment of any fees to the artist who
produced the original art.



8. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PACKAGE:

Effective January 1, 1989, the Foundation
implemented a full benefits package for its
staff. The package includes medical
insurance, dental coverage, life insurance,
short- and long-term disability coverage,
and a tax-deferred annuity retirement plan
established under Section 403(b) of the
Internal Revenue Code. Employees
contribute 25 percent of the cost of
medical insurance. The total amount
incurred by the Foundation for these
benefits for the year ended September 30.
1992. and the year ended September 30.
1991. was $130,884 and $124,806, respec-
tively. During fiscal year 1992, the package
was modified. Effective fiscal year 1993
short-term disability benefits will no longer
be provided,

9- FUNCTIONAL ALLOCATION OF
EXPENSES:

The costs of providing the various
programs and other activities have been
summarized on a functional basis in the
statement of support, revenues, expenses
and changes in fund balances. Accord-
ingly, certain costs have been allocated
among the programs and supporting
services benefited.

10. PROJECT UABUJTIES AND COM-
MITMENTS:

The Foundation's policy is to recognize
grant expenses when the grantee is
notified of the award and it becomes a
legal liability, i.e., when all conditions
placed on the grantee are met. This results
in a project liability to accrue for grants
not yet disbursed. At September 30. 1992
and 1991, project liabilities totaled
$2,709,942 and $3,749,535. respeoively.

In addition to the project liabilities
incurred in 1992 and 1991, the Foundation
iiicurred an additional $5,618,158 and
$3,689,011. respectively, in commitments
to fund certain projects. Although the
grantees were notified of the award, these
grants are conditional upon the grantees



raising matching funds and, therefore, do
not represent legal liabilities at Septemt)er
30, 1992 and 1991, Thus, the Foundation
has not recorded these grants as project
liabilities at September 30, 1992 and 1991.
These amounts have been reflected as
designated for project commitments in the
fund balances in the accompanying
balance sheets.

11. U.S. GOVERNMENT MATCHING
CONTRIBUTIONS:

As discussed in Note 1, the U.S. govern-
ment annually matches funds raised based
on the U.S. government's fiscal year
(October 1 through September 30). The
1992 and 1991 matching contribution
amount of $4,958,000 and 6.181.021
(includes $1,318,021 from fiscal year
i990's grant which was not earned until
fiscal year 1991) represents the amount for
wfiich the Foundation has met all match-
ing requirements as of September 30, 1992
and 1991, respectively, but has not yet
requested reimbursement. The
Foundations Board of Direaors will
approve corresponding disbursements for
the matching amounts subsequent to the
receipt of the funds.

12. COMMITMENTS AND
CONTINGENCIES:

On October lb, 1991. the FoundaUon
entered into a seven-year office space
lease, Pursuant to this lease, the Founda-
tion granted to the landlord a lien upon,
and a security interest in. tlie Foundation's
existing, or hereafter acquired inventory,
furniture, fixtures, equipment, licenses,
permits, and other assets.

Future minimum lease payments
required under this lease agreement are as
follows:

1993 $ 184,295

1994 191,667

1995 199.333

1996 207,307

1997 215,599
Thereafter 261,834
Total $1.260.035



99



Schedule of Restricted Fund Balances



Schedule I



For the Year Ended September 30. 1992



Initiative Name



Balance Net Balance

September 30, Fund Contributions Investment Expenditures September 30,

1991 Transfers Year to Date Income Year to Date 1992



North American Wetlands














Partnership


$4,806,868


$ 907,245


$ 1,996,960


$ 59,762


$ 3.544,146


$4,226,689


Neotropical Migratory Birds


48,370


897,100


1.861,420


3,287


2.586,918


223,259


Conservation Education


13,650


490,095


850,405


-


1.320.958


33,192


Fisheries & Wildlife Assessment


30,973


99,190


240,036


-


370.199


-


Fisheries


30,584


426,730


937,816


2,563


1.146,097


251,596


General Projects


1,419,188


(2,609,308)


6,873,795


264,577


2,605,196


3,343,056


Total


$6,349,633


$ 211,052


$12,760,432


$330,189


$11,573,514


$8,077,792



Schedule of Endowment Fund Balances



For the Year Ended September 30, 1992



The Theodore and Francoise Treffel-
GianouLsos Wildlife Trust Fund



Fund Balances

September 30,

1991



1992

Investment

Income



Fund Balances

September 30,

1992



$ 9,069



Fund for the Future:
Principal
Income

Grizzly Bear

Total



1,974,568
284,044

101,822


38,827
148,400


2,013,395
432,444

101.822


$2,369,164


$187,566


$2,556,730



The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of this schedule.

39



100



Schedule of Restricted Project LiABiunEs



For the Year Ended September 30. 1992



Initiative Name


Balance

September 30,

1991


Grant

Expense

1992


Cash

Disbm-sed

1992


Balance

September 30,

1992


North American Wetlands Partnership


$2,148,713


$ 3,544.146


$ 4,946,703


$ 746,156


Neotropical Migratory Biris


160,285


2,586,918


2.230.028


517,175


Conservation Education


106,746


1,320,958


1,076.804


350,900


Fisheries & Wildlife Assessment


-


370.199


370.199


-


Fisheries


308,000


1,146,097


1,051.023


403,074


General Projects


973,138


2,605.196


2,900,157


678,197




$3,696,902


$11,573,514


$12,574,914


$2,695,502



The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral pan of this schedule.



101



Staff



Amos S. Eno

Executive Director. Secretary to the Board

Nancy C. Bradley

Director of Finance & Administration. Treasurer to the Board

Krishna K. Roy

Director of Deivlopment & Marketing

Whitney Tilt

Director of Conservation Programs

William C. Ashe

Director, North American Wetlands Partnership

P. Whitney Fosburgh
Director. Fisheries Initiative

Joel Kaplan

Director, Fisheries & Wildlife Assessment

Peter Stangel

Director, Neotropical Migratori' Bird Conservation Initiative



Gwen Cantrell
Jen^- Clark
Alison Dalsimer
Stephanie Darby
Jonatlian Davis
Keith Davis
Eric Hammerling
Robin Hanford
Patrick Joos
Glenn Kinser
Jessica McKelvey
Lewis Nash
Liz Rockman
Ivelise Velazquez
Lucy Wallace
Lynn Yeager



Anne M. Bvers, Editor, 1992 Annual Report



102




National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

1120 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 900
Washington, DC 20036

202/857-0166 *

FAX 202/857-0162



103



TESTIMONY OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FISH AND

WILDLIFE AGENCIES ON THE REAUTHORIZATION OF

THE NATIONAL FISH AND WILDLIFE FOUNDATION ESTABLISHMENT ACT

PRESENTED BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON
ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Presented by

Gary T. Myers, Executive Director

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

P.O. Box 40747

Ellington Agricultural Center

Nashville, Tennessee 37204

July 13, 1993



Thank you Mr. Chairman for the opportunity to appear before
the Subcommittee to discuss the reauthorization of the National
Fish and Wildlife Foundation Establishment Act. First, I am Gary
Myers, Director, Tennessee Department of Fish and Wildlife. I am
here representing the International Association of Fish and
Wildlife Agencies. The International Association was founded in
1902 and is a quasi -governmental organization of public agencies
charged with the protection and management of North America's fish
and wildlife resources. The Association's governmental members
include the fish and wildlife agencies of the states, provinces,
and federal governments of the U.S., Canada and Mexico. All fifty
states are members. The Association has been a key organization in
promoting sound resource management and strengthening federal,
state and private cooperation in protecting and managing fish and
wildlife and their habitats in the public interest.

It is for these reasons that the International Association has
a great deal of interest in appearing before you today to discuss



104



the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The Foundation is known
for forging partnerships between the public and private sectors and
by supporting conservation activities that pinpoint the root causes
of environmental problems. Speaking from personal experience the
Foundation has provided much for the nation's fish and wildlife
resources and it is with great pleasure that I am here to try and
address some of the questions put forth in your letter of
invitation to testify here today.

First, there was a question regarding the effectiveness of
Foundation, partnerships in conserving and restoring our nation's
fish and wildlife resources. The Foundation invests in the best
possible solutions to environmental problems by awarding challenge
grants. The combined resources from Foundation partnerships fuel
effective conservation projects. Simply put, the Foundation
probably exhibits the partnership concept better than the many
other "partnerships" which have become so fashionable today. Let
me just give you a few numbers which should speak to the
effectiveness; since 1984 the Foundation has conferred 723 grants
that have totalled more than $85 million for conservation projects.
In fiscal year 1993 alone, the Foundation will obligate more than
$19 million for 191 conservation projects, committing more than
$6.2 million in federal matching funds that will be leveraged by
$13.1 million raised in cooperation with 126 conservation partners.
In the burdened and cash strapped world of state fish and wildlife
agencies, this represents a crucially important avenue for getting
important conservation work done that would unlikely be done



105



3

without the Foundation. In working with my fish and wildlife
Commission, the concept of leveraging funds to increase the buying
power of Tennessee's conservation dollars is one in which the
Commission enthusiastically buys into and supports. Quite simply,
it makes good business sense; if my agency can put forth one
dollar, and have it matched it increases its power.

In Tennessee alone, there have been 17 projects totalling $3.9
million (NFWF and outside funds) approved for funding as of June
1993. For example, the ($500,000) Hatchie Bottomland Hardwoods
project was approved in June 1992 for west Tennessee. This project
will see the implementation of "best management practices" on
cropland in the Bear River Watershed which is expected to reduce
annual sediment loading into the Hatchie River by 50%. Another
fine example is a NAWMP - 3rd step project for $632,000 approved in
March 1990. This important project witnessed the acquisition of
approximately 3,549 acres from Anderson - Tully to be managed as
part of the Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge. Yet another
example is the $120,000 Red Wolf Recovery program. Clearly,
Tennessee and its fish and wildlife resources have been major
beneficiaries of the Foundations continuing success.

Among the fine examples of the Foundation's effectiveness, has
been in its work with state fish and wildlife agencies in the North
American Waterfowl Management Plan. From the outset of this
landmark plan between the United States and Canada, the Foundation



106



4
and its Board has made the Plan and wetlands conservation in
general among its most important thrusts. It was the Foundation
which initiated efforts to raise and transfer funds for wetland
preservation in Canada known as the "step" program. Between 1988
and 1992 more than $40 million was generated with Foundation
assistance, to acquire, improve and enhance 500,000 acres of
wetlands wildlife habitat in Canada. Because of these efforts the
Foundation was instrumental in launching the NAWMP, arguably one of
the continents most successful conservation initiatives. The
Foundation- was farsighted in using some of the first Congressional
appropriations to "jump start" the North American; at a time when
there were skeptics who were sure that state and federal wildlife
managers were not committed to providing funds for the continent
wide management of waterfowl. By providing leadership at critical
times, and its continued leadership, the Foundation, along with
state fish and wildlife agencies and other conservation partners
has supported projects in 34 states, ranging from acquisitions and
habitat restoration to initiating public education and outreach
projects.

The Foundation has also provided true leadership for the
Partners in Flight conservation program for neotropical migratory
songbirds by bringing together federal and state government
agencies, and nongovernmental organizations to coordinate and
expand efforts for protection and management of songbirds and
raptors. They also have continued to maintain a strong presence in



107



5
the program's implementation through funding high priority and
visible conservation projects. They have made state fish and
wildlife agency projects an especially high priority in this effort
in hopes of realizing their goals of making a difference on-the-
ground. Through "Partners in Flight" they have created an
unparalleled nationwide conservation program; all 50 state fish and
wildlife agencies are involved. Their matching grants program has
allowed some of these states the opportunity to augment or develop
conservation actions to halt the decline of over 250 species.

The Foundation also will play a significant role in the newly
enacted Partnerships for Wildlife Act assisting state agencies with
obtaining matching grants for conservation projects related to fish
and wildlife not hunted or fished or on the endangered species
list. There are over 1,800 species these grants will aid, and many
of them neglected for years due to limited state and federal funds.

It must be pointed out that these examples are only a few of
the conservation efforts of the Foundation. The Foundation is also
active in fisheries, leadership training and wildlife and habitat
conservation throughout the U.S. All of this, I believe, clearly


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 14

Online LibraryUnknownNational Fish and Wildlife Foundation reauthorization : hearing before the Subcommittee on Environment and Natural Resources of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on reauthorizing the National Fish and Wildlife Foundat → online text (page 12 of 14)