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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA



PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND
MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID



M A G N E R ' S



ART OF



* and * Educating * Hsrses.



THJE

ART OF TAMING AND EDUCATING

THE HORSE:



A SrSTEM THAT MAKES EASY AND PRACTICAL THE SUBJECTION OF WILD AND VICIOUS

HORSES, HERETOFORE PRACTICED AND TAUGHT BY THE AUTHOR AS A SECRET,

AND NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED ; INDORSED BY LEADING CITIZENS

AND COMMITTEES OF EXPERTS IN THE PRINCIPAL CITIES AND

TOWNS OF THE UNITED STATES AS UNQUALIFIEDLY

THE SIMPLEST, MOST HUMANS AND EFFECTIVE IN THE WORLD;



Details of Management in the Subjection of over

FORTY REPRESENTATIVE VICIOUS HORSES,

AND

The Story of the Aut icr'o Personal Experience ;

TOGETHER WITH CHAPTERS ON-
FEEDING, STABLING, SHOEING, AND THE PRACTICAL TREATMENT FOR SICKNESS,
LAMENESS, etc., WITH A LARGE NUMBER OF RECIPES HERE-
TOFORE SOLD AS GREAT SECRETS.



9OO ILLUSTRATIONS.



BY D. MAGNER,

Assisted in the Medical Department byJAMES HAMILL, D. V. S., formerly Lecturer on Shoeing and D
of the Foot, in Columbia Veterinary College, N. Y.; CHAS. A. MEYER, D. V S., New York;
JOHN McLAUGHLIN, D. V.S ., State (New Jersey) Veterinary Inspector for the
Board of Health; B.C. McBETH.Vet. Surgeon, Battle Creek, Mich.



BATTLE CREEK, MICH.:
REVIEW & HERALD PUBLISHING HOUSE.

1886.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1883,

BY D. MAGNER,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



RESERVED.



Notice* Friends 'who may ^vish to com-
municate with me directly in relation to this look* or other busi-
ness, please address

JJ. MAGNER,

Battle Creek, Mich.

(See also page 1081.)



PREFACE.*'



THERE are eleven million horses in the United States, and not
one man in a million who knows how to educate them to the highest
degree of usefulness. We say educate; for the horse is an animal
of high and spirited organization, endowed by his Creator with
capabilities and faculties which sufficiently resemble man's to come
under the same general law of education and government. Prima-
rily, the word educate means to lead out or lead up; and it is by
this process of leading out and leading up a child's faculties that
the child becomes a useful man, and it is by a like process that a
colt becomes a useful horse. Now teachers, like poets, are born,
not made. Only a few are gifted to see into and see through any
form of highly organized life, discern its capacities, note the interior
tendencies which produce habits, and discover the method of
developing the innate forces until they reach their noblest expres-
sion, and then apply the true and sufficient guidance and govern-
ment. The few who have this gift are teachers indeed, and, next to
the mothers of the world, deserve the world's applause as foremost
among its benefactors.

Next to child training and government comes horse training and
government ; and which is the least understood, it were hard to say.
Boys and colts, so much alike in friskiness and stubbornness, both
are misunderstood and abused in equal ratio. The boys are shaken
and whipped, and colts are yanked, kicked, and pounded. That
high-spirited or slow-witted boys become good men, and high-

* This preface was written by a gentleman well known in the world of letters,
and especially famous, not only as a lover of fine horses, but as a high authority on
all matters concerning them. Learning that I had in preparation a new work, he
volunteered to write the preface, which is here given as a concise introduction to the
author's own labors, with a high appreciation of the compliment paid him by the
distinguished writer, in the personal allusion, the publication of which demands no
apology when its high source is considered.

(Tii)



M365479



viii PREFACE.

spirited or dull colts make serviceable horses, I conceive is due to
the grace of God more than to man's agency, that fine grace, I
mean, spread abroad through and existing in all His creatures,
which operates in regenerating continually, making the good better,
preventing those whose circumstances forbid their becoming good
from becoming absolutely bad.

The author of this book is known to me as one of the gifted
ones of the earth, because he is gifted to discern the nature of
animals, and educate them for man's service. The possession of
this gift suggested his mission, and well has he followed it, and by
it been educated himself to a degree rarely, if ever, attained by man
before. I doubt if there be on the globe his equal in knowledge as
to the best method of training horses. Through this volume he
seeks to give the public the benefit of his experience. I bespeak for
it the careful perusal of the curious, and of those especially whose
judgment and heart alike prompt them to seek for and promulgate
knowledge, which, being popularized, would make the people more
humane and horses more serviceable

W. H. H. M.



OF COPYRIGHTS,



The exclusive benefits of copyrights extend to twenty-eight year?,
then renewable for fourteen years; if the author is dead, to the
heirs, by re-recording, and advertising the re-record for four weeks
in any newspaper in the United States.

The forfeiture of all the books, and a penalty of fifty cents on
each sheet (sixteen pages) of the work, half to the United States,
and half to the author, is the penalty for publishing or importing
any work without the written consent of the author ; and the printer
is equally liable with the publisher.

Entries must be sent to the Librarian of Congress at Washing-
ton, D. 0. The laws are found in Vol. IV. of the United States
Statutes, pages 436-439.

j^JTThis Work is protected by three separate Copyrights, cover-
ing, first, its Title ; second, its Literary Composition ; and third.
its Engraving r s. c lB3J

There are also three patents covering important methods of
subjection and treatment given in this book. First, a simple means
of subjection by which any horse, however vicious, balky, or unman-
ageable, can be put in harness, subdued, and driven gently without
danger of accident. Second, a method by which headstrong, lung-
ing, runaway horses can be controlled directly, and so subdued by
the pressure of the reins upon the nerve centers, that he will soon
submit to the ordinary restraint of the bit. TJiird, a method of
preventing and curing contraction and quarter-crack an absolute
cure for quarter-crack, with freedom to drive on any road as desired,
without causing the hoof to split back as it grows guaranteed a
means of perfect cure. Fourth, (patent pending?) a method by which
most pulling, lugging horses on the bit will drive safely and easily
to a pleasant and easy restraint of the reins.

f^" 'Purchasers of this work from the author or his agents will
be given a special certificate entitling them to the use of cither or all
these patents (for personal use only), ivithout extra charge ; all
others using them will be subject to legal proceedings.'



GENERAL SUNDRY OF TljIS WORK,



TITLE PAGES, PREFACE, LAW OF COPYRIGHT, AND GEN-
ERAL SUMMARY, 8 pages.

CONTENTS, 12 "

THE WORK PROPER AND INDEX, . 1082 "



Total, 1102 pages.






PAGE.

INTRODUCTION 20

CHAPTER I.

METHODS OF SUBJECTION 20

Principles of Taming and Teaching Horses 20

First Method of Subjection 30

Second Method of Subjection 38

Third Method of Subjection 48

Control by Whipping 60

The War Bridle First Form 61

Double Draw Hitch Form 62

Second Form 63

W. or Breaking Bit 70

Four-Ring or Upper Jaw Bit 72

Half -Moon Bit 75

Spoon Bit 76

Patent Bridle 76

Foot Strap 79

Breaking Rig 83

CHAPTER II.

COLT TRAINING 91

Haltering a Wild Colt m 92

Taming or Making the Colt Gentle 94

Teaching to Follow How to Make the Colt Follow Instantly . 96

Training to Follow with the Whip Two Ways '. 96

Training to Follow with Halter and War Bridle 96

Driving to Harness 103

Bitting 107

Hitching to Wagon 110

Sullen, Lunging Colts 113

Colts that Throw themselves over Backwards 114'

Driving Double 116

Hitching the Colt by the Halter 116

(xi)



xii CONTENTS.

' CHAPTER III.

EXCESSIVE FEAR. ITS EFFECTS 118

Fear of Rattle of Wagon 125

Jumping out of Shafts 126

Fear of Top Wagon 126

Objects Exciting Fear while Riding or Driving 127

Fear of a Robe 129

Fear of an Umbrella or Parasol 130

Fear of Sound of a Gun 131

Fear of Hogs and Dogs 132

Fear of Railroad Cars 132

Insanity 135

Illustrative Cases. Case 1. Press Horse, Gowanta, N. Y. 136

Case 2. Brookville Horse, Pa 136

Case 3. Gates Horse, Garrettsville, 140

Case 4. Dr. Keegan's Horse, Cleveland, 141

Case 5. Greencastle Horse, Pa 142

C ase 6. Collins Horse, Toledo, O. 144

Case 7. Rochester Horse, N. Y 145

Case 8. Wild Pete, Petroleum Centre, Pa. 147

CHAPTER IV.

KICKING 152

Runaway Kickers 170

Confirmed Kickers 171

Sulky Kickers 173

Switching Kickers 179

Kicking Straps 179

Foot Straps 182

Over-draw Check 183

Hip Strap 186

Four-ring Bit 187

Kicking when Struck with the Whip in Driving 188

Kickers in Stall 190

Kicking while Harnessing 193

Kicking and Biting while Grooming 196

Bad to Bridle 196

Illustrative Cases. Case 1. Putney Horse; Vt 197

Case 2. Malone Horse, Cleveland, 198

Case 3. Watson Horse, Memphis, Tenn 201

Case 4. Hettrick Horse, New York City 203

Case 5. Hankey Mare, Gettysburg, Pa 206

Case 6. Goodman Horse, Mississippi 207

Case 7. Me Vay Horse, Mansfield, 212

Case 8. General Knox Stallion, Lancaster, N. H. . .215



CONTENTS. xiii

Case 9. Wild Ravenna Colt, 218

Case 10. Lima Stallion 220

CHAPTER V.

BAD TO SHOE 222

Palliative Treatment 222

Confirmed in the Habit 229

Regular Subjective Treatment 237

Leaning Over 239

CHAPTER VI.

BALKING 240

Palliative Treatment 243

A Maine Man's Method 246

Regular Treatment 248

Restless Balkers 250

Balking Double 252

Best Treatment 253

Overloading 255

Illustrative Cases. Case NO. 1 257

Case No. 2 257

Case No. 3 257

Case No. 4 258

CHAPTER VII.

RUNNING AWAY 261

Case No. 1. Dover Plains Horse 267

Case No. 2. West Falls, NY. 267

Half-moon Bit 268

Spoon Bit 269

Four-ring Bit 271

Patent Bridle 272

Lugging, or Pulling upon One Rein 273

Will not Back 274

Will not Wait or Stand when getting into or out of Wagon. 276

CHAPTER VIII.

HALTER PULLING 279

Running Back in the Stall when Unhitched 289

Making a Horse Stand without Hitching 290

How to Hitch to a Smooth Tree or Post so that the Strap will not

Slip ". ... 291



xiv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX.

STALLIONS 292

Treatment for Headstrong Stallions 296

Treatment for very Vicious Stallions 299

Godolphin Arabian 308

CHAPTER X.

MISCELLANEOUS HABITS 316

To Catch a Horse ; 316

Cribbing 319

Wind-sucking 323

Putting the Tongue out of the Mouth 323

Pawing in Stall 325

Kicking in Stall 326

Getting Cast in Stall 326

Jumping over Fences 32T

Tender Bitted 328

Kicking Cows 328

To Lead a Cow Easily 330

To Force a Horse on a Trot 330

CHAPTER XI.

TEACHING TRICKS 334

Teaching to Follow with Whip 334

Teaching to Nod his Head, or Say " Yes" 334

Teaching to Shake his Head, or Say " No " 334

Teaching to Tell his Age 334

Teaching to Kick Up 335

Teaching to Kiss 337

Teaching to Lie Down and Sit Up 337

Teaching to Sit Up 339

Teaching to Throw Boys 340

Teaching to Walk upon his Hind Feet 345

Teaching to Walk upon the Knees

Teaching to Chase a Man out of Ring 346

Teaching to Drive without Reins 347

CHAPTER XII.

HORSE-BACK RIDING 350

How to Sit upon a Horse 351

Secure and Insecure Positions 352

Mounting 355

Holding the Reins 357



CONTENTS. xr

Ladies Learning to Ride 858

The Value of Horseback Riding for Cure of Dyspepsia, etc 360

CHAPTER XIII.

SUBJECTION , 365

Historical Facts 365

Dick Christian 365

Bull 365

Jumper. 366

The Irish Whisperer 366

Offutt 368

O. H. P. Fancher 368

John S- Rarey How he Attained his Success, etc. 368

The Effects of Treatment 384

Review of System 397

Medicines or Drugs 403

Control by the Eye or Will 408

Illustrative Cases. Case 1. Mt. Vernon Horse 412

Case 2. Gallopsville Horse 414

Case 3. Buffalo Omnibus Co/s Horse 415

Case 4. Oxford Horse 418

Case 5. Hermon Horse 420

Case 6. Wilkins Horse. 421

Case 7. Hillman Horse, Jet 425

Case 8. Norwalk Horse 434

Case 9. Allegan Man-Eater 435

Case 10. Roberts Horse 440

Case 11. Mustang Pony 443

CHAPTER

DENTON OFFUTT, Rarey's Instructor, 449

Extracts from Offutt's Book. Taming with Medicines 456

Great Secret for Taming 456

CHAPTER XV.
FAMILIAR TALK WITH THE READER 457

CHAPTER XYI.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE 473

Almost a Failure 479

Meeting Difficulties 481

Experiments 483

Driving without Reins 485

First Publication . . 487



xvi CONTENTS.

Visit to Maine 488

Exciting Curiosity 491

Success in Maine 493

Special Experiments 495

Difficulties 497

Opposition 499

Success in Cleveland 501

Success in Michigan 503

Publications Revised 507

In New York 509

Test Experiments 523

Keeping Engagements 533

CHAPTER XVII.

BREEDING 537

Selection of Stallion 539

Care of the Mare , 540

CHAPTER XVIII

STABLING 543

Serious Objections 545

Ventilation 547

Proper Style of Rack, etc 549

CHAPTER XIX.

FEEDING AND WATERING 550

Cooking the Food 554

Watering 557

CHAPTER XX.

HOW TO TELL THE AGE 559

Diseases of the Teeth 56?

CHAPTER XXI.

SHOEING. Part First 580

Outline of the Structure of the Foot 581-592

General Remarks 627

Trimming 646

Excessive Paring. Remarks from Gamgee 653

Adjustment of the Shoe .... 657

Nailing the Shoe 661

Clinching Down the Nail. 665

Shoeing tho Hind Feet 666

Contraction . 668



CONTENTS. xvii

The Spreaders 681

Curling under of Heel 685

Quarter Crack 691

Corns 695

Weak Heels 700

Clicking, or Overreaching 707

Stumbling 708

Shoeing Sore or Tender Feet 708

Shoeing Foundered Horses 711

Extracts from Gamgee on Coleman, Youatt, Miles, Flemming's
Comments, Osmer, Sollesev, Lafosse, Freeman, M. Char-
lier " 712-725

CHAPTER XXII.

CIRCULATION 732

General Plan of Circulation 732

Ventilation 743

CHAPTER XXIII.

DISEASES AND THEIR TREATMENT 746

Inflammation 746

Antiphlogistics 749

Osteosarcoma 751

Enchondrona 751

Diseases of the Bones 751

Anchylosis of Bone 752

Caries of Bone 752

Necrosis of Bone 753

Exostosis, or Bony Enlargement 754

Splint, or Splent 754

CHAPTER XXIV.

DISEASES OF THE JOINTS 756

Spavin 756

Ring-bone 770

Side Bone, or False Ring-bone 772

Curb 772

Bog Spavin, or Thorough-pins 774

Capped Hock 776

Wind-Galls 776

CHAPTER XXY.

NAVICULAR-JOINT LAMENESS 778-798

Neurotomy 799

Condition of the Feet in Chronic Lameness 803

1*



xviii CONTENTS.

Hypertrophy 80S

Atrophy 803

Corns 805, 813

Laminitis, or Founder 828

Chronic Founder 838

Peditis, or Inflammation of the Os Pedis

CHAPTER XXVI.

CATARRH 841

Laryngitis, or Sore Throat 843

Strangles, or Horse Distemper 845

Glanders and Farcy 848, 854

CHAPTER XXVII.

CHRONIC COUGH 854

Heaves, or Broken Wind 856

Roaring 859

Bronchocele 861

Nasal Gleet 862

Influenza Epizootic Catarrhal Fever 864

Pink Eye 866

CHAPTER XXVIII.

DISEASES OF THE CHEST 868

Congestion of the Lungs 873

Pneumonia Inflammation of the Lungs 875

Pleurisy. 878, 882

Hydrothorax, or Water on the Chest 883

Typhoid Pneumonia 884

Bronchitis 885

CHAPTER XXIX.

COLIC 886

Tympanites, or Flatulent Colic 894

Inflammation of the Bowels 898

Superpurgation, Diarrhea, etc 902

Constipation 905

Worms 906

Bots 912

Inflammation of the Kidneys 915

Profuse Staling, (Diuresis) 916

Retention of Urine 918

Bloody Urine 918



CONTENTS. xix

CHAPTER XXX.

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM 918

Inflammation of the Brain Phrenitis 919

Megrims, or Vertigo 921

Sun Stroke 922

Paralysis 927

Azoturia Partial Paralysis Spinal Meningitis 923

Rabies, or Madness 931

Tetanus, or Lockjaw 928

Stringhalt 935

Thumps, or Spasmodic Action of the Diaphragm 935

Lymphangitis Weed Monday Morning Leg 937

The Peritoneum 938

Peritonitis 938

The Stomach 939

Indigestion 939

Acidity of the Stomach 939>

Acute Indigestion 940

CHAPTER XXXI.

THE FOOT INJURIES OF, AND CAUSE OF LAMENESS 941

Pricking in Shoeing, Stepping on Glass, etc 941

Foot Lameness 945

Seedy Toe 946

Gravelling 947

Bruise of the Sole 947

Treads or Calks 948

Overreach 951

Quittor : . 951

Thrush 954

Canker 955

CHAPTER XXXII.

SPRAINS, BRUISES, ETC 956

Sprain of the Back Tendons 957

Breaking Down 962

Sprain of the Fetlock 963

Sprain of the Perforans Tendons 964

Joint Lameness 964

Shoulder Lameness 664

Sweeney 966

Hip Lameness 968

Knuckling Over 970

Broken Knees, or Open Joint 971

Fractures . . . 974



xx CONTENTS.

Dislocation of the Patella, or Stifled 976

Stifle-joint Lameness 977

CHAPTER XXXIII.

OUTS AND WOUNDS 977

Injuries of the Tongue 983

Sore Mouth 984

Fistula of the Withers and Poll Evil 985, 987

CHAPTER XXXIV.

DISEASES OF THE EYE 990-998

Simple Ophthalmia, or Inflammation of the Eye 991

Specific or Periodic Ophthalmia 994

Amaurosis, or Glass Eye 997

Cataract 998

Dropsy of the Belly Ascites 999

Anasarca, or Swelled Legs 1000

Inflammation of the Veins Phlebitis 1001

Thrombus 1002

Lampas 1003

CHAPTER XXXV.

DISEASES AND INJURIES OF THE SKIN 1003

Surfeit 1003

Urticaria, Nettle Rash, Hives, etc. 1004

Mange 1005

Hen Lice 1007

Ring- Worm 1007

Scratches, Mud Fever, and Cracked Heels 1008

Grease 1012

Tumor on the Shoulder 1014

Tumor on Point of the Elbow 1016

Sallenders 1017

Mallenders 1017

Saddle or Collar Galls 1017

CHAPTER XXXVI.

TENOTOMY 1018

Division of the Tendons 1019

Castration 1022

Injuries and Diseases of the Penis 1024

Foulness of the Sheath and Yard 1025

Parturition, or Foaling 1025

Abnormal Presentations 1026

Blisters.. . 1027



CONTENTS. xxi

Counter Irritants 1028

Hot Fomentations 1032

Poultices 1034

The Pulse 1035

Giving Balls 1038

Physicking 1040

Bleeding, or Phlebotomy 1042

Setons 1044

The Rowel 1044

Tracheotomy 1045

Embrocations 1047

Caustics 1049

CHAPTER XXXVII.

MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 1050-1061

Recipes from the Author's old book 1062-1072

Human Remedies 1073-1081

General Index.. . 1082-1088




INTftOD UCTIOX.



THE horse is the most indispensable and valuable of all
the animals used by man. Nearly all the avocations and
many of the recreations of every-day life, are largely
dependent on the use of horses. When treated intelligently
and properly, the horse is the most tractable and serviceable
of all the domestic animals ; but if treated ignorantly or
badly, he is liable to become so vicious and unmanageable
as to be comparatively if not wholly worthless.

While there is no lack of information and accepted
authority on breeding, stabling, shoeing, driving, color, etc.,
etc., as pertaining to horses, there is a singular lack of
authority, or even intelligent understanding, on the art of
arts, namely, that of teaching, subduing, and changing the
character of wild or vicious horses, as desired. In fact,
there is no book or other authority on the subject, it being
practically a new science, the principles of which have but
recently become understood, as developed by the author of
this work.

There is no subject more of a mystery, even to the
most intelligent, or about the successful performance of
which there is more incredulity or misconception. It is
supposed that if a horse is courageous and strong, and
becomes vicious or resists control, the fault must be wholly
in an incorrigibly bad temper, that makes his successful
management impossible ; whereas a proper understanding
of the subject shows that the animal's condition is the
result of ignorant, bad treatment, and which kind, intelligent
treatment would entirely prevent or overcome ; and that
in consequence, a large proportion of the best horses by

(7)



8 INTRODUCTION.

nature have fastened upon them hahits that make them
practically unsafe and worthless for use. Then by the
present system, proved to be so defective and injurious, it
is the work not unfrequently of months and years to break
colts to drive; and even after this great expenditure of
time and effort, many of the best horses are ruined ; so
that the loss to the people of the country both from the
depreciation of value, accidents, and loss of time, is in the
aggregate enormous.

One horse kicks ; a second balks ; a third pulls against
the bit and runs away despite the efforts of several men to
hold him ; a fourth will not stand while persons are getting
into or out of a carriage; another is liable to kick the
blacksmith over when he tries to take up or hold his foot
for shoeing, compelling, in many cases, the necessity of
roping the horse down on his side to be shod ; another is
liable to kick any person coming within reach of his heels ;
the next is perhaps all right until he catches the rein
under his tail which he is sure to do when he is liable
to kick or run away ; while, perhaps, the next will try to
pull loose or break his neck when hitched by a halter or
bridle; another fears a baby-wagon, stone, stump, dog,
white cow, umbrella, robe, train of cars, or something else.
One horse will not stand ; another will not back ; another
will pull away when led by the halter; another lugs on
the bit, or pulls on one rein. One horse will not work
double, another will not work single ; and so on to the end
of the catalogue of vices to which horses are subject.
These, with many other vices or habits that could be
mentioned, are the cause not only of great pecuniary loss,
but of personal injury, if not destruction of life, throughout
the country, which, when fully realized, is fearful to con-
template. What city, village, or neighborhood is there
that has not almost daily disastrous accidents resulting



INTRODUCTION. 9

from the use of horses ? And how many horses of spirit
do we find that do not have some one or more of these
habits that have been mentioned ?

Now if we can prevent or overcome all this without
abuse or accident, saving at least nineteen twentieths of
the time employed in breaking them, and give assurance of
their entire subjection and safety, it is certainly deserving
of being ranked among the most important features of
benevolence and economy to the people of the country.

There have not been wanting at different times many
who have pretended to be able to tame and control horses
of the most vicious character, but upon investigation it has
proved that their success was based upon a very slender
knowledge of the art. Whatever has been my own success,
it is a slow growth, the result of long-continued observation
and experimenting, following up every apparent or real
clue that promised success, until I learned how to act
directly upon the horse's brain, and to influence it as
desired. My progress at first was very slow and uncertain,
and I was exposed almost constantly to failures. This,
though annoying and frequently discouraging, was the only
means of instruction by which I was finally able to grasp
the subject with sufficient clearness to reduce the knowledge
to a practical basis.

During the early part of my experience I was greatly
misled, and consequently lost much valuable time in
experimenting on wrong principles and methods of treat-
ment, and was compelled to abandon such methods by
reason of failures. In this way I was led to study out new
principles and methods of treatment adapted to the various
peculiarities of disposition and character in horses, until I
was able to discern with great certainty the exact treatment
for each case.

The prevailing lack of confidence in my principles and



10 INTRODUCTION.

methods of management was also a serious cause of
embarrassment to me, since it continually forced me, at
great expense and loss of time, to make experiments upon
the most vicious horses that could be found, in order to
prove the value of my treatment. The experiments in
New York City, and other places, referred to in Personal
Experience, will in part illustrate this.

In the winter of 78 my health had become so seriously
impaired that I was compelled to give up traveling. I
now concluded to carry out at my leisure the purpose
which had for some time been developing in my mind, that
of writing out the full details of my system, including such
knowledge as I believed most valuable to horse-owners for
reference. I at first intended to make a work of only
about three hundred pages, which would embody merely
the simple outlines I gave to classes, with some additions



Online LibraryUnknownThe art of taming and educating the horse: a system that makes easy and practical the subjection of wild and vicious horses, heretofore practiced and taught by the author as a secret, and never before published.. → online text (page 1 of 74)