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THE JAMES D. PHELAN
CELTIC COLLECTION




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X"



THE HARP OF PERTHSHIRE



t*



THE



HARP OF PERTHSHIRE



A COLLECTION OF ,\ !

o ;;',:,.

, anb 0thcr poetical ipi

CHIEFLY BY LOCAL AUTHORS

WITH NOTES
EXPLANATORY, CRITICAL, AND BIOGRAPHICAL



BY

ROBERT FORD

Author of "Thistledown," and Editor of'"Auld Scots Ballants," etc.




THK AULD HOUSE OF CASK



ALEXANDER GARDNER

Jfublisber to $er Majesty the GJueen
PAISLEY; AND PATERNOSTER SQUARE, LONDON

1893



.



ERRATA.



Page 78, line 43 /or " to " read " by."

Page 112, line 30 for " Lyndoch " read " Lynedocb."

Page 398, line 21 for " master-place " read " muster-place."

Page 438, line 39 for " Aberdeen " read "Glasgow."



832864



PREFACE.



IT has been remarked by more than one writer whose
attention has been led to the subject that Perthshire
has not produced any one who, in the loftier sense of
the word, may be described as a great poet. And this
is no doubt true. But, verily, there is only one shire
in all Scotland that can, with uplifted head, claim for
itself such rare distinction. And if Perthshire has not
produced a Eobert Burns, or any poet that may be
ranked within measurable distance of the "glorious Ayr-
shire ploughman," the County, methinks, that can name
as its own the gifted lady of Gask, who, next to the
National Poet, has given more songs of enduring fame
to the world than any other single singer that Scotland
has seen ; the County that gave birth to, and nurtured
the early genius of Robert Nicoll, of Tully beltane ;
James Stewart, of Dunkeld ; Charles Spence, of Rait ;
and many another singer of scarcely less merit that
might be named ; whose scenes of natural beauty, and
types of female loveliness, have attracted the Muse of
nearly every poet of note in the land as witness the
Perthshire songs of Burns, Scott, Hogg, and Tannahill
has distinct claims to consideration in the matter of
its Poets and Poetry.

The home poets of Perthshire, indeed, as we hope
this work will satisfactorily demonstrate, have neither



VI. PREFACE.

been few in respect of numbers, nor contemptible in
regard to merit. Eeviewing them in their chronological
sequence, as the reader will find examples of their work
arranged in the succeeding pages, from the time of
Gavin Douglas, of Dunkeld, down to the present day,
we discover a galaxy of authors of whom any County
or district may be reasonably proud, and such a large
number of songs and poems of more than parochial
fame, the most of them by Perthshire writers, as will
more than justify the publication of a work such as is
here presented. Following the illustrious Bishop of
Dunkeld, who flourished in the end of the fifteenth and
in the beginning of the sixteenth centuries, and in
addition to " The Palace of Honour," and " King Hart,"
and other works of a strikingly original and highly
poetical character, "gave," as Scott in Marmion reminds
us, " rude Scotland Virgil's page," we find Henry Adam-
son, the author of "The Muses Threnodie," whose
writings in 1637 attracted the favourable notice of
Drummond of Hawthornden, who recommended their
publication, because, as he said, "longer to conceal
them will be to wrong your Perth of her due honour,
who deserveth no less of you than that she should be
thus blazoned and registrate to posterity." Next comes
into view Alexander Eobertson, of Struan, with his
curious medley of verses, serious and satiric the great
" Struan " who fought under Dundee at Killiecrankie,
under Mar at Sheriffmuir, and under Prince Charlie at
Culloden ; who is followed by the Rev. John Barclay,
the founder of the Bereans, a native of Muthill, who
wrote a rhymed version of the Psalms, and is the
reputed author of one of the various ballads extant
which celebrate the historic battle of Sheriffmuir. Then



PREFACE. Vll.

comes David Malloch, or Mallet, of the same fertile
district, with his imperishable song of " The Birks of
Invermay," and his beautiful and pathetic ballad of
" William and Margaret," the latter of which, on its
original publication in Aaron Hill's Plain Dealer, in
1724, set literary London positively by the ears. A
few years later we discover Dugald Buchanan, of Bal-
quhidder, the well known Gaelic poet, who is followed
by Duncan Ban Macintyre, still dear to Breadalbane
and the hills of Glenorchy ; Andrew Sharpe, of Bridg-
end, the author of " Corunna's Lone Shore," and Alex-
ander Campbell, of Tombea, editor of Albyris Antlwlogy,
and the author of " Row weel, my Boatie, row weel."
Following these in their course we are brought down
towards the end of the eighteenth century, when the
lyric muse of Robert Burns was making glorious the
very hill tops of Scotland, and the "Flower of Strath-
earn " as yet unseen was blossoming into song in the
" Auld House " of Gask, and surreptitiously adding to
the " Land o' the Leal," the " Laird o' Cockpen," and
many of her finest lyrics. And now comes into view
Charles Spence, of Raitt, with his songs of " The Twa
Bumbees " and " Linn Magray," etc., who is followed
by David Drummond and his "Bonnie Lass o' Leven-
side ; " William Clyde, with " St. Johnstoun's Bells ; "
David Webster, with " Tak' it, Man, Tak' it;" James
Beattie, of Leetown, with his poems of "The Spring
Lark," and "The Rainbow," and other songs of delicate
beauty and tender emotion. Next we see James
Stewart, of Dunkeld, with his graphic and clever char-
acter songs of "Our Little Jock," " Fouscanhaud," and
"The Tailor o' Monzie ; " and William Wilson, of
Crieff, with " Jean Linn," and " Auld Johnny Graham.''



Vlll. PREFACE.

Now we catch a glimpse of the bright morning star of
Tully beltane Eobert Nicoll with his " Bonnie Bessie
Lee," "The Folk o' Ochtergaen," "The Toun where I
was Born," and many other familiar songs and poems.
At his elbow is his younger brother, William, with one
or two thoughtful pieces. Then comes David Millar,
with his long and loving poem of " The Tay ; " Caroline
Oliphant, the younger; dear old Mrs. Sandeman, of
Bonskeid and Springland worthy grand-niece of the
authoress of " The Land o' the Leal " with her good
and gifted daughter, Mrs. Barbour, recently deceased,
and still more highly gifted grandson, the late Rev.
Robert W. Barbour, each with songs of exalted fancy,
richly imbued with spiritual suggestiveness.

Conspicuous among a number who follow each other
in rapid succession towards the middle of the current
century, there is discovered just behind Alexander
Maclagan, the author of "A Cronie o' Mine," and
" Hurrah for the Thistle," the giant form of the Rev.
George Gilfillan, the one eloquent expounder of mys-
terious "Night;" Dr. Charles Mackay, author of " Cheer
Boys, Cheer," who was a native of Perth ; the late Sir
William Stirling Maxwell, of credit and renown, for
many years the County's able representative in Parlia-
ment ; the Rev. Dr. J. R. Macduff, of Bonhard, a
voluminous writer in prose and verse ; Dr. John Ander-
son, the revered and gifted minister of Kinnoull ; the
Rev. Dr. William Blair, of Dunblane ; the late Peter
Norval, of Collace ; D. H, Saunders, of Blairgowrie,
the well known " Christian Democrat ; " Duncan Mac-
gregor Crerar, familiarly known as " The Breadalbane
Bard," for many years resident in America ; the Rev.
Peter Anton, of Kilsyth, who is a native of the Carse



PREFACE. IX.

of Gowrie ; James Ferguson, of Stanley (" Nisbet
Noble ") ; and many more.

From among those we have named, it will be seen
there are not less than a dozen who enjoy a literary
reputation that is co-extensive with the language in
which they wrote and sang : while of the others, with
the forty to fifty more, notice of whom will be found in
the body of the work, it may, we think, be said without
prejudice or fear of contradiction, that they have each
produced something worthy of at least local preserva-
tion.

The anonymous muse has also made contributions to
Perthshire literature, which cannot be overlooked in a
popular collection ; some of them being of great beauty,
and not a few possessing considerable historic interest.
And the inclusion of the more prominent of these
"The Weary Coble o' Cargill," "Bessie Bell and Mary
Gray," " Killiecrankie," the various ballads celebrating
the Battle of Sheriffmuir, and " The Lass o' Gowrie,"
etc., with the notes which accompany them may prove
to many readers not the least interesting feature in the
book.

In addition to all these, we have embraced, in a
separate department, the more notable Perthshire songs
of Burns, Scott, Hogg, and Tannahill, and others,
because, by reason of their own inherent merit, as well
as the subjects they variously celebrate, they have come
to be esteemed as essentially a part and parcel of our
local literature. Much more might have been included;
many more local authors might have found representa-
tion in the work ; and many more poems and songs by
outside writers, bearing upon local subjects, might have
found admittance. To make, however, anything like



X. PREFACE.

an exhaustive collection of the poetry of Perthshire,
not one, but a number of volumes would be required.
At the same time, we think it will be generally admitted
that all that is best and of most vital interest in the
poetical literature of our beautiful and well beloved
County has found a place in these pages.

The work of collecting and arranging the material
has been to ourselves, in large measure, a labour of
love, and we look for our reward mainly in the pleasure
which we anticipate the book will afford to natives of
Perthshire at home and abroad, many of whom have
manifested the keenest interest in the progress and
completion of the undertaking.

In the matter of size and general construction only may
the present work be said to be uniform with its illustrious
prototype, The Harp of Renfrewshire. The first series
of that earlier work, which rose under the capable hand
of William Motherwell, contains many poems and songs
which have no connection with Renfrewshire, either in
the matter of subject or authorship; but here not a
single verse will be found that has not a claim to a place
in the volume by the one good reason or the other.
Perhaps a higher uniformity of merit could have been
maintained had we chosen to ransack Scottish litera-
ture for gems wherewith to adorn the brow of our
native County; but we preferred to "pick and wale"
only among such effusions as belong to Perthshire
by titular or native right. And herein lies the chief
value of the book to those whom we expect to be
moved by it. It is all our own ; and is the first earnest
attempt to afford a fairly comprehensive and popular
representation of the poetry of the richly song-favoured
and restricted district to which the title applies. The



PREFACE. xi.

selections are not all of equal merit (this were next to
impossible in a work of the kind), but a fair standard
of excellence has been set up, and, we think, has been
honourably maintained throughout. Such differences
in quality as will be found existing, may be compared
to the beauty of one flower, or the stately elegance of
one tree, as contrasted with another, and will give a
charm of variety to the work, which perhaps a stricter
uniformity of tone and colour would fail to yield.

If into these pages, forsooth, we have been able to
gather an abundant harvest of poesy much of it, too,
of excellent quality and we think we have it is surely
not more than might be expected from the field that
has yielded the crop. Perthshire is rich beyond measure
in such scenery as is best calculated to inspire the
beholder to articulate song. " Among all the provinces
in Scotland," says Sir Walter Scott, "if an intelligent
stranger were asked to describe the most varied and
the most beautiful, it is probable he would name the
County of Perth. . . . The most picturesque, if
not the highest, hills are to be found here. The rivers
find their way out of the mountainous region by the
wildest leaps, and through the romantic passes connect-
ing the Highlands with the Lowlands. ... Its
lakes, woods, and mountains may vie in beauty with
any that the Highland tour exhibits ; while Perthshire
contains, amidst this romantic scenery, and in some
places, in connection with it, many fertile and habitable
tracts which may vie with the richness of merry
England herself."

" * Behold the Tiber ! ' the vain Roman cried,
Viewing the ample Tay from Baiglie's side ;
But where's the Scot that would the vaunt repay,
And hail the puny Tiber for the Tay ? "



xii, PREFACE.

Xow, enough by the way of preface. We will be
joining the reader here and there in the notes throughout
the volume, and for a more lengthened period in the
biographical notices at the close. Until that longer
meeting he will form many new friendships, and revive
a good many old ones, and, we hope, will spend many
a pleasant half-hour.

Our thanks are due, and are gratefully recorded, to
the various authors and publishers who have readily
granted permission to make extracts from copyright
works, and to the ladies and gentlemen who have
furnished books and manuscripts for the purpose of
making selections.

To Miss Stewart, the sole surviving niece of Lady
Nairne who at the advanced age of ninety-eight is,
happily, still hale and well we have to express our
special thanks. It is to her kindly disposition that the
reader, as well as the publisher and editor, is indebted
for the fac-simile of the original MS. of "The Land o*
the Leal."

EGBERT FORD.



GLASGOW, 1893.



CONTENTS.



POEMS AND SONGS.

PAGE

A Cronie o' Mine, Maclagan, 206

A Dialogue between Will Lickladle and

Tom Clean Cogue, Barclay, 59

A Highland Funeral, . W. Barbour, 354

Allan Mac Allan Dhu, Stewart, 157

Allan Water, R. M. Fergusson, ... 365

Alma, Countess of Breadalbane Crerar, 293

A Legend of the Daisy, Whittet, 277

A May Song, W. Robertson, 330

" A Midsummer Nicht's Dream," Jessie M. King, 371

Answerto'Tm Wearin' awa', John,". .Gray 123

A Prelude Whtitet, 276

Archy o' Kilspindie, Finlay, 417

Around Benchonzie's Purple Crest, Edwards, 361

A Soliloquy, Sim, 98

A Tale o' Kirrie, Geddes, 339

Athol Cummers, Hogg 405

Auld Johnny Graham Wilson, 163

Auld Johnny Shaw, M'Culloch, 235

Autumn Thoughts, Jessie M. King, 372

A Valentine, Cromb, 319

Aye Fen' for Yersel', White 195

Bessie Bell and Mary Gray Anon., 46

Bewitched, Young, 271

Biggin' a Nest, Ford, 318

Blythe, blythe and merry was She, Burns, 394

Bonnie Bessie Lee, Nicoll, 167

Bonnie Ochtertyre, Kippen, 286

By Allan Stream, Burns, 396

Caledonia's Blue Bells, Crerar, 292

Caller Herrin', Baroness Nairne, ... Ill

Cam' ye by Athol? Hogg, 403

Charming Phillis, Nicol, 87

Corunna's Lone Shore, SJiarpe, 91

Craigie Hill, Clyde, 137

Cromlet's Lilt, Anon., 30



xiv CONTENTS.



Death, M. F. Barbonr, 260

Donald Gunn Webster, 141

Donald Macinroy, Saunders, 290

Duncan Ker, Stewart, 159

Dunsinane, Ferguson, 308

Elegiac, Sir W. S. Maxwell, 243

Epistle to Tammas Bodkin, J. Campbell, 201

Epitaph on Alexander Robertson of

Struan, Nicol, 88

'Es'Aet, P. W. Barbour, 353

Fair Helen and Lord William, Shain, 178

Fallen Leaves, Fraser, 374

Farewell, W. Nicoll, 177

Farewell to Aberfoyle, Richardson, 75

For Lack of Gold, Austin, 74

Fouscanhaud, Stewart, 153

Gilderoy, Anon. , 42

Glen Ogil, D. M. Smith, 326

Glentulchan's Sweet Flower, Mercer, 214

Golden Gorse, Blair, 280

Hail to the Chief, Scott, 399

Hansel Mononday, A. M. Scott, 385

Hereafter, Steven, 266

Her Reply, Anon., 32

Hey the Rantin' Murray's Ha', Baroness Nairne, ... 112

Home in Heaven, Oliphant, 185

Hurrah for the Thistle, Maclagan, 209

Hymn to Fire, Oilfillan 219

In the Gloaming M. B. White, 382

It'sa'Owre, Dryerre, 324

Jean Linn, Wilson, 162

Jeanie Brown, James Craig, 349

Jenny Whitelaw, Gairns, 1 90

Kate o' Gowrie, Reid, 119

Kilbryde Kirkyard, Blair, 279

Killiecrankie, Anon. , 51

King Hart, Douglas, 11

Kinnaird, A. M. Scott, 386

Kinnoull Cliff, F. Buchanan, 263

Kitty Reid's House, Baroness Nairne, . . . 109

Lady Keith 's Lilt Drummond, 64

Lassie wi' the Yellow Coatie, Duff, 131

Life is short, but Lore is long, R. M. Fergusson, . . . 365

Linn-Ma-Gray, Spence, 1 28

Lord Ruthven ; or the Waes o' Dupplin'

Field, Pyott, 340

' Love of Right and Scorn of Wrong, " Macduff, 244

Lumbago, Young, 267

Maggie Lyle, F. Buchanan, 263

Mary Morrison, Wilson, 165



CONTENTS. XV.

PAGE

Mary of Sweet Aberfoyle, Gkn, 135

Mary of Torabea, Scott, 397

Mary Rose, Stewart, 160

Maternal Night, Jacque, 1 92

Morning in May, Douglas, 7

Morning Musings in the Highlands, .Robertson, 191

Mount Pilatus, Gilfillan, 222

My Auld Grannie's Leather Pouch, Maclagan, 209

My Auld Scottish Bonnet, Peacock, 238

My Bairn, Imrie, 203

My Bonnie Bit Lassie Anderson, 386

My Bonnie Rowan Tree, Crerar, 295

My Father an' my Mither, John Paul, 351

My First Saumon, GraJiam, 148

My Friend, afurray, 288

My Grannie's Bible, James Paul, 363

NeilGow's Farewell to Whisky, Lyon, 410

Now Winter's Wind Sweeps, A. Campbell, 94

Och, Hey, Hum, Mitchell, 375

Oh, Never 1 No, Never ! Oliphant, 184

Oor Auld Wife, Ford, 317

Oor Hoose at E'en, S. J. Stewart, 313

Ossian's Grave, Wordsworth, 416

Our Last Flittin', White, 197

Our Little Jock, Stewart, 151

Pibroch of Bonnie Strathearn, Kippen, 286

Piper M'Nee, Farquharson, 216

Piscator Dolorosus, Anton, 332

Poor A nne, Lewis, 407

Pursuit o' Prince Charlie, Spence, 125

Quitting the Manse, Sandeman, 186

Receive, Resign, Restore, M. F. Barbour, 261

Rob Roy's Grave Wordsivorth, 412

Row Weel, my Boatie, A. Campbell, 94

Ruth, Sir W. S. Maxwell, 240

St. Johnstoun's Bells, Clyde, 136

Scotland, Land of Liberty, Edwards, 3.VJ

Scottish Song of Victory, Macnaughton, 231

Shallum, Sir W. S. Maxwell, 243

Since Loyalty is still the Same, Robertson, 49

Sing, Little Bird Steven, 265

Sir James the Rose, Anon., 37

Song of the Royal Highland Regiment, . Maclaggan, 89

Song of the Tay, Ferguson, 307

Sonnet: Scottish Heather, M. B. White, 384

Sonnet : To a favourite Evening Retreat, Main, 332

Sonnet : To Chaucer, Main, 331

Strathallan's Lament, Burns, 395

Sunlicht an' Munelicht, Pyott, 344

Tak it, Man, Tak it, Webster, 139



xvi. CONTENTS.

PAGE

Tayis Bank, Anon., 13

That Horn Spoon the Tinkler made Mitchell, 378

The Athol Gathering, Anon., 68

The Auld Carle's Courtship,.. Norval, 283

The Auld Craw's Lament, Taylor, 297

The Auld House, Baroness Nairne, ... 105

The Banks of Allan Water, Lewis, 406

The Battle of Corriemucklocb, Anon., 248

The Battle of Luncarty, Vedder, 420

The Battle of Sheriffmuir, M'Lennan, 54

The Birks of Aberf eldy, Burns, 394

The Birks of Invermay, Mallet, 69

The Birks o' Invermay, Anon., 71

The Blind Exile's Return, Macnaughton, 232

The Bonnie Banks o' Fordie, Anon., 27

The Bonnie Burnie, Mackay, 226

The Bonnie Earl of Moray, Anon., 40

The Bonnie Lass o' Levenside, Drummond, 133

The Bonnie Wee Rose Bud, Agnew, 142

The Bower of Tay, Hogg, 404

The Braes abune Stobha', Ford, 315

The Braes o' Balquhither, Tannaliill, 409

The Braes o' Mount Blair, A. Fergusson, 300

The Braes roun' aboot Auchterairder, . . . Neisli, 388

The Brooch of Lorn, Scott, 400

The Burnie's Sang, Neish, 389

The City Pent, W. Nicoll, 176

The Croaker, *. James Paul, 362

The Darwinian Theory, Young, 269

TheDeilandM'Ommie, Sim, 95

The Deil's Stane, D. M. Smith, 327

The Duke o' Athol's Nurse, Anon., 35

TheEirlic Well, Crerar, 293

The English Knight, Norval, 285

The Faithful Swain, Spence, 124

The Fate of the Locking-Glass, Robertson, 51

The Flower o' Dunblane, Tannaliill, 408

The Folk o' Ochtergaen, Nicoll, 168

The Forsaken , Nicoll, 170

The Frozen Burn, Whittet 278

The Garb of Old Gaul, Sir Harry ErslcineC!) 77

The Garb of Old Gaul, Anon., 80

The Gathering of the Hays, Anon., 66

The Goldfinch's Nest, Beattie, 145

The Graces' Spell Tovani, 380

TheGude Wallace Anon., 17

The Hero of Barossa, Duff. 132

The Hills o' Breadalbane, Maclagan, 213

The Holocaust of the Witch of Monzie, . Blair, 252

The Hundred Pipers, Baroness Nairne, ... 114



CONTENTS. XV11.



The Iron Horse, ................................ Balfour, .............. 246

The Kilted Hielandmen, ..................... J. Campbell, .......... 198

The Laird o' Cockpen, ................. ....... Baroness Nairne, . . . 102

The Lament of Benedict, the Married

Man, ......................................... Nicoll, .................. 172

The Land o' the Leal, ......................... Baroness Naiine, ... 99

The Lass o' Glenshee, ......................... Anon., .................. 146

The Lass o' Gowrie, ........................... Anon., .................. 116

The Lass o' Gowrie, ........................... Col. Ramsay, ........ 117

The Lass o' Gowrie, ........................... Baroness Nairne, ... 118

The Last Adieu to the Hills, ............... Madntyre, ............ 84

The Lauch in the Sleeve, .................... Anton, .................. 335

The Lofty Lomonds, .......................... Norval, ............... 282

"The Lord is my Shepherd," ............... Macduff, ............... 245

The Macgregor's Gathering, ................ Scott, ................... 402

The Maiden wha shore in the Band win'

wi'me, ....................................... W. Robertson ........ 328

The Maid of Isla's Lament, ................ .A. Fergusson, ....... 302

The Muir o' Gorse and Broom, ............. Nicoll, .................. 169

The Muses Threnodie, ........................ Adamson, ............ 1

Then and Now, ................................. Sandeman, ............ 187

The Old Hearse, ................................ Jacque, ................ 193

The Past, ......................................... Anderson, ............ 258

The Poet's Grave, .............................. W. Nicoll, ............ 175

The Power of Love, ........................... Anderson, ............ 257

The Priest o' Kinfauns, ...................... Millar, ................ 182

The Queen's Visit, ............................. 8. Fergusson, ......... 272

The Rainbow, ................................... Seattle, ................ 145

The Romance of the Rose, .................. Anderson, ............ 369

The Rose, ........................................ Richardson, .......... 76

The Rowan Tree, .............................. Baroness Nairne, ... 113

The Scottish Plaid, ............................ Murray, ............... 287

The Skull, ........................................ Buchanan, ............ 81

The Spring Lark, ............................. Beattie, ................. 143

The Summons of Love, ....................... Cromb, ................. 320

The Sunday Cough, ........................... Anderson, ............. 259

The Sunny Side, ................................ S. J. Stewart, ........ 314

The Sun's on the Heather, .................. James Craig .......... 350

The Tailor o' Monzie, ......................... Stewart ................ 155

TheTay, .......................................... Millar, ................ 180

The Tollman's Lament, ...................... John Craig, .......... 345

The Toun where I was Born, ............... Nicoll .................. 166

TheTwa Bumbees, ............................ Spence ................. 126

The Valley of the Earn ....................... Nelson .................. 204

The Valley of the Shadow, .................. Geddes, ................ 336

The Viking's Bride, ........................... R. M. Fergusson,... 366

The Weary Coble o' Cargill (Old), ......... Anon., ................. 21

The Weary Coble o' Cargill (Modern), ...A non ................... 24

The Weaver's Bairn, .......................... Pringle, ................ 350

The Wheel of Life, ............................ Kobertoti t ............ 48



xvili. CONTENTS.

PAGE

The Wifie o' Cargill, A. Fergusson, 301

The Windy Gowl, J. Smith, 304

The Wisdom o' my Granny, Farquharson, 218

The W T itch on the Brae, W. Stewart, 250

The Wounded Soldier J. J. 8. Stewart, .... 303

The Wraith o'Garry Water, Mackay, 227

Tibby and the Laird, Maclagan, 212

To Wordsworth, M. B. White, 384

Tullymet, Ferguson,.... 309

Turlum, Dryerre, 321

TwaAuldFouk, Dryerre 323

Twilights, R. W. Barbour, .... 355

Wearied and Worn, J. Campbell, 199

"Weel thro' the Valley," Mitchell, 377

We'll Hunker Doon to Nane, J. Smith, 306

We'll mak' the Warld better yet, Nicoll, 174

We're a' a'e Mither's Bairns, Peacock, 236



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