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IN PREPARATION



A SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESENT VOLUME,

presenting titles chosen from the Literature of American History
published in 1900 and 1901. Edited with notes selected by Philip
P. Wells, Librarian of the Yale Law School, New Haven, Conn. For
probable date of publication and for price, address

SECRETARY PUBLISHING BOARD

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

10i BEACON ST., BOSTON, MASS.



American Library Association Annotated Lists

THE LITERATURE OF AMERICAN

HISTORY

A Bibliographical Guide

In which the scope, character^andcomparativeworth of books

in selected lists are set forth in brief notes

by critics of authority

CONTRIBUTORS

PROFESSORS CHARLES M. ANDREWS, EDWARD G. BOURNE, RALPH C. H. CATTERALL, EDWARD CHANNING,

CHARLES W. COLBY, WILLIAM M. DAVIS, DAVIS R. DEWEY, JOHN R. FICKLEN, GEORGE P.

GARRISON, B. A. HINSDALE, SAMUEL MACAULEY JACKSON, WILLIAM MACDONALD,

ANDREW C. MCLAUGHLIN, ANSON DANIEL MORSE, HERBERT L. OSGOOD,

B. J. RAMAGE, EDWIN E. SPARKS, GEORGE M. WRONG

GENERAL JACOB D. Cox, LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, COLONEL SAMUEL

ADAMS DRAKE, REV. H. W. HULBERT, Miss GRACE KING,

REV. GEORGE A. THAYER

MESSRS. JAMES BAIN, JR., CLARENCE S. BRIGHAM, VARNUM LANSING COLLINS, PAUL LEICESTER FORD,,

WILLIAM E. FOSTER, FREDERICK W. HODGE, JAMES K. HOSMER, WILLIAM MCLENNAN, MERTON

L. MILLER, ERNEST GUSHING RICHARDSON, FRANK H. SEVERANCE, FREDERICK J. SHEP-

ARD, CHARLES HOWARD SHINN, REUBEN GOLD THWAITES, STEPHEN B.

WEEKS, GEORGE PARKER WINSHIP



Edited for the American Library Association
By J. N. LARNED



BOSTON

Published for the American Library Association by

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO.

1902



COPYRIGHT, 1902
BY THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION



ENTERED AT STATIONER'S HALL



All rights reserved



Published June, iqos



U, G.

ACADEMY OF

FACIFfC COAST

HISTORY



INTRODUCTORY



ONLY those who have to do with the work of public libraries know how much there is of
the desire for substantial knowledge among people who can satisfy it nowhere if not at those
libraries, and how much such readers are misled towards books which are obsolete, or shoddy-
made, or otherwise unprofitable, missing the ones that would instruct them most and inspire
them best. All that librarians can do to light the way of the seeker to the worthiest literature
is generally being done, with anxious and inventive zeal ; but the utmost they are able to
accomplish in their catalogues, without help from special students in a thousand different
regions of knowledge, answers to the need of common students scarcely more than a railway
map for travelers as compared with a Baedeker guide. The case is one that calls for informa-
tion to be given with particularity and discrimination, by critics of recognized acumen and
character, whose judgments are set forth with no claim to finality, but stand open to revision
as error is detected or new truth disclosed.

An early perception of this need led the Society for Political Education, in New York, to
publish in 1880 a list of books in political science recommended by Professor William G.
Sumner, Mr. David A. Wells, and other special students in that department of knowledge.
In 1891 this little bibliography was amplified, under the editorship of Messrs. R. R. Bowker
and George lies, who were assisted in the selection and annotation of titles by many well-known
publicists and economists, including James Bryce, David A. Wells, Andrew Dickson White,
Horace White, Professors Felix Adler, Davis R. Dewey, E. R. A. Seligman, Richmond Mayo
Smith, and others. The work thus enlarged was published by the same society as "The
Reader's Guide in Economic, Social, and Political Science," and proved to be a valuable and
welcome aid.

With his understanding of the need of such "guides" much deepened by the experience
obtained in this work, Mr. lies brought the subject into discussion at a meeting of the American
Library Association in 1892, by reading a paper on " The Evaluation of Literature," in which
he urged the Association to undertake the organization and execution of some plan " which
shall give an inquirer in any specialty of literature, at every public library, at all times, the
services of the best informed and fairest adviser to be had in the Union." "A merchant or
banker," said Mr. lies, "when he has taken an inventory of his assets, is not content with a
mere enumeration of them ; he deems a bare list as of no worth whateyer until each item
has been carefully valued. So, I take it, the trustees of literature will enter upon a doubled
usefulness when they can set before the public not catalogues merely, but also a judicious
discrimination of the more from the less valuable stores in their keeping."

The suggestions of Mr. lies were discussed with warm interest, and were referred to a special
committee for more careful consideration ; but the Association had many things to do with
slender means, and it hesitated to enter on a project of labor and expense which showed no
bounds. Then Mr. lies began to give practical effect to the proposition he had advanced.
Produced at his expense, and mostly by his own exertions, the American Library Association
published in 1895 an exceedingly useful " List of Books for Girls and Women and their Clubs,
with descriptive and critical notes and a list of periodicals, and hints for girls' and women's
clubs ; edited by Augusta H. Leypoldt and George lies." This was followed in 1897 by an
" Annotated Bibliography of Fine Art," in which a list of works on painting, sculpture, archi-
tecture, and arts of decoration and illustration, was selected and critically annotated by Mr.



INTRODUCTORY

Russell Sturgis, and a list of works on music by Mr. Henry E. Krehbiel. Both of those gentle-
men had been contributors to the " List of Books for Girls and Women"; in the Bibliography
of Fine Art they expanded their two departments to a range which included about a thousand
volumes. The work was edited by Mr. lies, and published under the auspices and for the
benefit of the Library Association, without cost to that body for the manuscripts.

Again addressing the Association, in September, 1896, on what he described as " The Appraisal
of Literature," Mr. lies placed the subject in a very impressive light. " One small class in the
community," he said, "has the good fortune always to have the best reasons in reading and
studying its books. The young men and women in our colleges and universities enjoy mani-
fold advantages of training, discipline, and culture ; among all these benefits one of the chief
is their economy of time and attention through reading and studying only the best books.
Thanks to the guidance of trustworthy judges, they can shun the output of the mere mechanic
of the pen ; one first-hand work of authority judiciously supplements another; the defects and
errors chargeable even to the greatest writers are pointed out, and, where a subject is brought
down to date in periodicals, the best of these are indicated. Popular education will receive an
immense impulse when guidance of this kind is rendered the plain people, not only by the
university professor, but by everybody else able and willing to give it."

Publication of the "Annotated Bibliography of Fine Art" was soon followed by proposals
from Mr. lies to the American Library Association which contemplated the undertaking of an
"appraisal of literature" in the great and important field of American history, and provision
was made by that gentleman, not only for the first execution of the work, but for continuing
it in current notes of description and criticism on future historical writings as they appear, by
a gift of ten thousand dollars. The work was begun in the spring of 1898 ; its completion has
been delayed by various circumstances which could not well be controlled. My connection
with it was consequent on the interest I have felt in the views of Mr. lies, and my wish to see
his plans carried out in so important a field as that of American history. I heve not been a
special student in that field, and therefore I lacked qualifications which ought to have been
brought to the supervision of bibliographical work in it ; but when no one with special equip-
ments for the task seemed ready or free for it, I ventured myself in the undertaking, at the
request of Mr. lies. Fortune favored me ; for the editorial function in this work has been
minimized in importance to the last degree by a corps of contributors who brought counsel as
well as labor, and zeal as well as knowledge, to ensure its success. Two who had eminence
in that helpful company General Jacob D. Cox, soldier, statesman, and man of letters, and
Professor B. A. Hinsdale, the historian of "The Old Northwest " have passed from life since
they wrote what bears their names here.

In addition to the notes specially written for these pages, a considerable number have been
drawn from books of critical authority, and from a few periodicals which are scrupulously
careful to employ competent pens in the preparation of their book reviews. Permission for
the quotation of such notes has been given with a kindness which claims hearty thanks. They
are duly credited in each instance to their source.

At the outset, those who consult this work should understand that it is intended to be neither
an exhaustive bibliography of American history, nor merely a selection of the best books in
that department of literature, nor does it name merely curious books. The selective aim in its
preparation has been to embrace the books of every character, good, bad, and indifferent, con-
cerning which it seems to be important that readers of various classes should be told what their
merit or demerit is. This takes in text-books for school-children as well as source-books for
historians and treatises for statesmen; and it includes a considerable class of popular writings
from past generations which have disappeared from the bookstores, but which survive on
the shelves of public libraries, where lingering echoes of an old undeserved reputation help to
carry them into unwary hands.

With the counsel and guidance to be found in the annotated lists given here, any person who
has access to a public library in this land of free books may study any part of American history
with thoroughness ; for his study is not limited to the resources of a single library or a single



INTRODUCTORY

t

town. The loaning of rare books from one library to another is now permitted to so great an
extent that it is seldom impossible for an earnest student to obtain any book which he really
needs to make his study complete. This is especially true in the State of New York, where
any citizen, duly vouched for, may borrow books from the State Library at Albany on condi-
tions that are simple and inexpensive in the extreme.

For guidance in purchasing books of primary importance in American history, the lists sug-
gested on page 463 by Professor Edward Channing, of Harvard University, for small public
libraries or for individual use, will be found of great value. They name the books in the order
in which they may be most profitably read, and each title bears a section-number referring to
its note in the body of this work. The note prefixed by Professor Channiug to his lists contains
sterling counsel to every young reader and student of American history, who cannot do better
than to heed that counsel at the outset of his work.

The annotated lists in this volume include but few works issued from the press since the end
of the year 1899. Arrangements have been made for continuing the "appraisal" of books
produced from that date forward, on subjects connected with American history, under the
editorship of Mr. Philip P. Wells, Librarian of the Yale Law School, New Haven, Conn.,
following in a general way the lines of classification and treatment adopted in this book.
The supplement for 1900 and 1901, in pamphlet form, will be published either simultaneously
with the present volume, or soon afterward. Subsequent issues will duly appear, and may
from time to time include works published before the close of 1899. Enlarged by these issues,
it is hoped that the present guide may be republished at suitable intervals in revised form.

On the work now made public my personal labor ended when the manuscript of titles and
notes had been finished, classified, and arranged. From that point it was most painstakingly
prepared for the press, and the type-setting and proof-reading supervised, by Mr. Franklin O.
Poole, of the Boston Athenaeum, with the aid of Mr. lies, who has given his time and his care
as liberally as he gave from his purse. The elaborate index has been prepared by Mrs. Mary
E. Haines and Miss Mabel R. Haines, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Because many subjects are touched
in more than one part of the classified bibliography, and the writings of many authors are noted
in more than one place, the index is a feature of great importance and should be constantly
used. To those unaccustomed to the use of a bibliography it may be said that, so far as
could be ascertained, the books not priced were out of print when these pages were prepared.
It has not been feasible to state the number of pages or the sizes of publications named.

It is the hope of the American Library Association that what Mr. lies has enabled it to do
for the literature of American History may be done hereafter, with help from other friends,
for other departments of literature, until the whole domain of letters and learning is furnished

with similar guides.

J. N. LARNED.
BUFFALO, N. Y., January, 1902.

It is proper to acknowledge here that Mr. Lamed gave without fee or reward his labors as

General Editor of this work.

GEORGE ILES.
NEW YORK, January, 1902.



CONTENTS



PAGES

INTRODUCTION iii

TABLE OF CONTENTS . vii

CONTRIBUTORS ix

PART L SOURCES 1-30

A SYLLABUS OF EXISTING MATEKIALS FOR ORIGINAL STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY

BY PAUL LEICESTER FORD 1-13

HISTORICAL SOCIETIES 14-20

PART II. AMERICA AT LARGE 21-8

GENERAL HISTORY 21-23

GEOGRAPHY AND PHYSIOGRAPHY 23-28

EARLY GOVERNMENTAL EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS ..... 23-25

LATER GEOLOGICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL SURVEYS 25-28

NATIONAL SURVEYS 25-27

STATE SURVEYS .... * 27-28

MISCELLANEOUS GEOGRAPHICAL LITERATURE 29-32

ARCHAEOLOGY ANTHROPOLOGY .

ARCH^OLOGICAL STUDIES 32-38

ABORIGINES 38-50

EUROPEAN DISCOVERY AND EARLY EXPLORATION : GENERAL ACCOUNTS AND

COLLECTIONS . . 50-56

PRE-COLUMBIAN DISCOVERY . 56-59

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE DISCOVERY AND EARLY EXPLORATION . . 59-65

OTHER DISCOVERIES AND EARLY EXPLORATION 65-68

PART III. THE UNITED STATES 69-357

DIVISION 1 : HISTORICAL PERIODS 69-273

PERIOD OF COLONIAL SETTLEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT. 1607-1760 . . 69-111

THE COLONIES IN GENERAL 69-76

NEW ENGLAND COLONIES 76-92

MIDDLE COLONIES 92-100

SOUTHERN COLONIES (ENGLISH) 100-106

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN COLONIES AND SETTLEMENTS (FRENCH) . . 106-1 10

SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN COLONIES AND SETTLEMENTS (SPANISH) . 110-111

PERIOD OF DISCONTENT, REVOLT, AND INDEPENDENCE. 1760-1783 . . . 111-152

PERIOD OF FEDERAL UNION AND CONSOLIDATION. 1783-1828 . . . 152-181

WAR OF 1812 167-172

WESTWARD EXPANSION. 1783-1828 .' 172-481

PERIOD OF THE SLAVERY QUESTION. 1828-1860 181-213

THE MEXICAN WAR 204-206

WESTWARD EXPANSION. 1828-1860 206-213

PERIOD OF CIVIL WAR. 1860-1865 213-260

PERIOD OF RECONSTRUCTION AND AFTER. 1865-1899 . . . . . . 260-273

SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 1898 267-270

THE NEW POSSESSIONS AND THE EXPANSION POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES 270-273

vii



CONTENTS

PAGES

DIVISION 2: COMPREHENSIVE HISTORY 273-294

DIVISION 3: CONSTITUTIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL HISTORY AND EXPOSITION 294-319

TEUTONIC AND ENGLISH ORIGINS . 294-301

AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 302-319

DIVISION 4 : ECONOMIC HISTORY . 319-331

DIVISION 5 : EDUCATIONAL HISTORY 331-337

DIVISION 6 : CHURCH HISTORY 337-357

PART IV. THE UNITED STATES BY SECTIONS 358-394

NEW ENGLAND .............. 358-365

THE OLD "MIDDLE STATES" .......... 365-375

THE OLD "BORDER" AND "SOUTHERN" STATES 375-383

THE MIDDLE WEST AND NORTHWEST 383-389

MIDCONTINENTAL AND PACIFIC REGIONS 389-394

PART V. CANADA 395-440

GENERAL NOTE 395-397

DIVISION I : MATERIALS FOR HISTORY ........ 397-399

CARTOGRAPHY AND BIBLIOGRAPHY 397-399

ETHNOLOGY 399

COLLECTIONS OF DOCUMENTS PROCEEDINGS OF SOCIETIES, ETC. . . . 399-405

DIVISION II : CONSTITUTIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL HISTORY .... 406-408

DIVISION III : COMPREHENSIVE HISTORIES . 408-410

DIVISION IV : FRENCH REGIME, INCLUDING ENGLISH CONQUEST . . . 410^421

DIVISION V : ENGLISH REGIME . . . 422-430

DIVISION VI : MARITIME PROVINCES, INCLUDING NEWFOUNDLAND . . . 430^433

DIVISION vn: HUDSON'S BAY, NORTH-WEST AND LABRADOR . . . . 433-438

DIVISION VIII : EDUCATION 438-440

PART VI. SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE AMERICA AND THE WEST

INDIES 441-462

GENERAL NOTE 441^442

GENERAL WORKS 442^45

-"-^ MEXICO 445-450

CENTRAL AMERICA AND NORTHERN SOUTH AMERICA . . . . 451-453

PACIFIC STATES OF SOUTH AMERICA 453-456

ATLANTIC STATES OF SOUTH AMERICA 456-458

THE WEST INDIES 458-462

APPENDIX, BY EDWARD CHANNING, PROFESSOR OF HISTORY IN

HARVARD UNIVERSITY 463-471

INTRODUCTORY NOTE 463-464

BOOKS SUGGESTED FOR A GOOD SCHOOL LIBRARY 464-465

BOOKS SUGGESTED FOR A TOWN LIBRARY 465-466

BOOKS SUGGESTED FOR A GOOD WORKING LIBRARY 466-467

LIST OF PUBLISHERS 473-477

INDEX 479-588

ADVERTISEMENTS 589-596



Vlll



CONTRIBUTORS

INITIALS PREFIXED TO NAMES



C. M. A. Andrews, Charles McLean, Profes-
sor of History, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn
Mawr, Pennsylvania.

J. B. Bain, James, Jr., Librarian, Public Li-
brary, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

E. G. B. Bourne, Edward Gaylord, Professor
of History, Yale University, New Haven,
Connecticut.

C. S. B. Brigham, Clarence Saunders, Libra-
rian, Rhode Island Historical Society, Provi-
dence, Rhode Island.

R. C. H. C. Catterall, Ralph Charles Henry,
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

E. C. Channing, Edward, Professor of His-
tory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mas-
sachusetts.

C. W. C. Colby, Charles William, Professor
of History, McGill University, Montreal,
Province of Quebec, Canada.

V. L. C. Collins, Varnum Lansing. Library

of Princeton University, Princeton, New

Jersey.
J. D. C. Cox, General Jacob Dolson, Soldier

of the Civil War, Ex-Governor of Ohio (died

August 4, 1900).

E. Cr. Cruikshank, Lieutenant-Colonel Er-
nest, Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada.

W. M. D. Davis, William Morris, Professor
of Geology, Harvard University, Cambridge,
Massachusetts.

D. R. D. Dewey, Davis Rich, Professor of
Economics and Statistics, Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology, Boston, Massachu-
setts.

S. A. D. Drake, Colonel Samuel Adams, Care
of Messrs. Little, Brown & Co., Boston,
Massachusetts.

J. R. F. Ficklen, John Rose, Professor of
History and Political Science, Tulane Uni-
versity, New Orleans, Louisiana.

P. L. F. Ford, Paul Leicester. 37 East 77th
Street, New York City.

W. E. F. Foster, William Eaton, Librarian,
Public Library, Providence, Rhode Island.

G. P. G. Garrison, George Pierce, Professor
of History, University of Texas, Austin,
Texas.

B. A. H. Hinsdale, Burke Aaron, Late Pro-
fessor of Pedagogy. University of Michi-
?an, Ann Arbor, Michigan (died Nov. 29.
900).

F. W. H. Hodge, Frederick Webb, Bureau
of American Ethnology, Washington, D. C.



J. K. H. Hosmer, James Kendall, Librarian,
Public Library, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

H. W. H. Hulbert, Rev. Henry Woodward,
Old Stone Church Study, Cleveland, Ohio.

S. M. J. Jackson, Samuel Macauley,- Profes-
sor of Church History, New York Univer-
sity, New York City.

G. K. King, Grace, 2221 Prytania Street,
New Orleans, Louisiana.

W. MacD. MacDonald, William, Professor of
History, Brown University, Providence,
Rhode Island.

A. C. McL. McLaughlin, Andrew Cunning-
ham, Professor of American History, Uni-
versity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

W. McL. McLennan, William, 1056 Dorches-
ter Street, Montreal, Province of Quebec,
Canada.

M. L. M. Miller, Merton Leland, Walker
Museum, Chicago, Illinois.

A. D. M. Morse, Anson Daniel, Professor of
History, Amherst College, Amherst, Mas-
sachusetts.

H. L. O. Osgood, Herbert Levi, Professor of
History, Columbia University, New York
City.

B. J. R. Ramage, Burr James, Professor of
Law, University of the South, Sewanee,
Tennessee.

E. C. R. Richardson, Ernest Gushing, Libra-
rian, Princeton University, Princeton, New
Jersey.

F. H. S. Severance, Frank Howard, 150
Jewett Avenue, Buffalo, New York.

F. J. S. Shepard, Frederick Job, Public
Library, Buffalo, New York.

C. H. S. Shinn, Charles Howard, Niles, Ala-
meda County, California.

E. E. S. Sparks, Edwin Erie, Professor of
American History, University of Chicago,
Chicago, Illinois.

G. A. T. Thayer, Rev. George Augustine,
304 Oak Street, Cincinnati, Ohio.

R. G. T. Thwaites, Reuben Gold, Secretary,
State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.

g. B. W. Weeks, Stephen Beauregard, Santa
Fe, New Mexico.

G. P. W. Winship, George Parker, Librarian,
John Carter Brown Library, Providence,
Rhode Island.

G. M. W. Wrong, George McKinnon, Pro-
fessor of Modern History, University of To-
ronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.



IX



THE LITERATURE OF AMERICAN HISTORY



PART I. SOURCES

A SYLLABUS OF EXISTING MATERIALS FOR ORIGINAL
STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY

BY PAUL LEICESTER FORD



OF essential value to the historical student
are classes of material not subject to analysis
or appraisal. These may be divided roughly
as follows :
GENERAL

Archives and Bibliographies

Collected Documents

Periodicals

Publications of Societies and Clubs
PUBLICATIONS OF DIFFERENT GOVERNMENTS



Swedish

British
Canadian

United States
States in General
States, Particular



Spanish
Mexican

Portuguese

Italian

French

Dutch

German

Necessarily the system involves a certain
amount of duplication and cross-reference, as
well as the inclusion of some volumes or series
treated in a critical sense in another part of this
work. As will be noted, wherever a satisfac-
tory bibliography or index exists, a reference
to it is given in lieu of any detailed descrip-
tion. 1

GENERAL

Archives and Bibliographies

The Reports of the American Historical
Manuscripts Commission, published in the Re-
ports of the American Historical Association,
are valuable, and include Printed Guides to,
and Descriptions of Archives, etc. (Report for
1896, p. 483), and Items respecting Historical
Manuscripts (Report for 1898, p. 573). 2 In Win-
sor's Narrative and Critical History of America
(VIII, 414) is a description of manuscript ma-
1 The reference numbers introduced in this matter
are for convenient guidance from the author and
subject Index at the end of the volume.



terials for American history. 3 See, also, Lane
and Bolton's Notes on Special Collections in
American Libraries (Cambridge. 1892). * The
Bulletins of the Department of State (Wash.
1893-1900. 10 v.) are devoted to calendars and
republications of the Department of State ar-
chives ; for which see, also, Allen's The Histori-
cal Archives of the Department of State (Annual
report of the American Historical Association
for 1894, p. 281), and A List of Manuscript Vol-
umes in the Department of State, containing
the Records and Papers of the Revolution
(American Historical Association Report for
1894, p. 554). 5 Friedenwald's Historical Manu-
scripts in the Library of Congress (American
Historical Association Report for 1898, p. 35)
and Hoar's Account of the Material for Histor-
ical Study now accessible in Washington (The
American Antiquarian Society Proceedings,
New Series, II, 118) describe government ar-
chives. 6 Other calendars of importance are
those of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts (Cam-
bridge. 1882), Winsor's Calendar of the Sparks
Manuscripts (Cambridge. 1889), and the Calen-
dar of the Emmet Papers (New York Public
Library Bulletin, v. 1-3). 7

In bibliography, Sabin and Eames's Diction-
ary of Books relating to America (N. Y. 1868-
92. 19v.+), though unfinished, stands first, but
of value is Rich's Bibliotheca Americana Nova
(Lond. 1832-44. 3v.). 8 Of positive importance
for special periods are Harrisse's Bibliotheca
Americana Vetustissima (N. Y., Paris. 1866-72.
2v.), Bartlett's Bibliotheca Americana (Provi-
dence. 1870-82. 4v.) a catalogue of the John
Carter Brown Library, and Leypoldt and Bow-
ker's American Catalogue of Books in Print
1876 (N. Y. 1880-1. 2v. Supplements, 1885-
1900. 4v.). A similar catalogue, for books
printed 1800-76 is announced. 9 See, also,



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