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The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 — Volume 02 of 55 1521-1569 Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Re online

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identification.

[83] This name is given at Arrezun in _Col. doc. inéd. Ultramar_.

[84] In _Col. doc. inéd. Ultramar_, this name it given as Francisco
Escudero de la Portolla.

[85] In another document, dated February 20, 1565 (published in
_Col. doc. inéd. Ultramar_, iii, pp. 81, 82), Legazpi personally
verified the possession taken by Ybarra, Andrés de Urdaneta being
witness thereto. On that day Legaspi took possession not only of
Cibabao but of the adjacent islands.

[86] In _Col. doc. inéd. Ultramar_ (p. 336), this name is given as
"ypolito atanbor."

[87] Many of these names are signed with a _rubrica_ or flourish,
which, like the French _paraphe_, was customary as a protection
against forgery.

[88] Apparently referring to the president of the _Audiencia_ of New
Spain, although the formal address is to that body as a whole.

[89] This list does not accompany the letter, either in the Sevilla
archives or in _Doc. inéd;_ but see Bibliographical Data for this
document, at end of this volume.

[90] The Spanish _quintal_ varied in different provinces and colonies
as follows (equivalents given in U.S. pounds): Aragón, 109.738476;
Castile (and Chile), 101.6097; Asturias, 152.281185; Catalonia, 87.281;
Valencia (old measure), 109.728476; Buenos Aires, 101.4178. This unit
of weight has been generally replaced by those of the metric system.

[91] Evidently this word is used in its early sense, of one who
practiced blood-letting, etc., as the barber often performed duties
now strictly pertaining to the physician.

[92] The _arroba_ was equal to four _quintals_.

[93] The _braza_ was a measure of length, equivalent to 16.718
decimeters, or 1.82636 yards (U.S.) The name originated (like the
French _brasse_) in the primitive use of the human arm as a measure of
length. The _braza_ (square) was used in the Philippines as a measure
of surface, being equivalent to 36 Spanish, or 30.9168 English,
square feet.

[94] A short dagger with a broad blade.

[95] In the relation published in _Col. doc. inéd. Ultramar_, ii,
pp. 265-277, where these transactions are recounted in greater detail,
these names are spelled Camutrian (Camutuan, Camotuan), and Maletec,
respectively.

[96] Apparently the same as the Massaua of earlier documents.

[97] In the relation cited above, note 92, the name of this island
is spelled (p. 277) Camiguinin.

[98] The second ship of the fleet, "San Pablo." The "San Pedro"
or flagship was spoken of as the _capitana_.

[99] A veil of thin gauze worn by the Moors. Evidently the term is
used in this connection, as the Mohammedans of these islands were
called Moros (Moors) by the Spaniards.

[100] Apparently referring to the island of Negros.

[101] The word is _escaupiles_, which was a species of ancient
Mexican armor.

[102] An equestrian exercise with reed spears.

[103] The actual date of departure was the twenty-first.

[104] See note 43, _ante_, as to the cost of the fleet. The reference
in the text is apparently to some Mexican mint or mine.

[105] This vessel was the "San Lucas," commanded by Alonso de Arellano;
see account of its adventures in "Expedition of Legazpi."

[106] A reference to the relation sent to Felipe II by
Legazpi - probably by the "San Pedro."

[107] A measure for grain containing one-third of a _fanega_.

[108] An error naturally made, in those early days of acquaintance
with the Philippines, since the island of Mactan (Matan), where
Magalhães was slain, lies near the coast of Cebú. According to the
_U.S. Philippine Gazetteer_ (p. 69), the archipelago comprises twelve
principal islands and three groups, with one thousand five hundred
and eighty-three dependent islands.

[109] Apparently meaning the "San Pedro," which was despatched from
Cebú by Legazpi on June 1, 1565. It reached Navidad on October 1,
and probably arrived at Seville in May or June, 1566.

[110] The _concha_ and _blanca_ were ancient copper coins of the
value of one-half and three _maravedis_, respectively. The coins
above-mentioned evidently resembled these in size.

[111] The "San Geronimo."

[112] Throughout this document, the statements and comments of the
notaries will be enclosed in parentheses, to enable the reader more
easily to separate the various letters and writs from one another.

[113] The _caracoa_ is a large canoe used by the Malayan peoples - "with
two rows of oars, very light, and fitted with a European sail, its
rigging of native manufacture" (_Dic. Acad._). According to Retana
(_Zúñiga_, ii, p. 513*), the word _caracoa_ is not to be found in
Filipino dictionaries.

[114] Referring to the rule of Sebastião, the infant king of Portugal,
and of his grandmother Catarina, regent during his minority.

[115] Javelins: the Portuguese word is _azagayas_, with which
cf. _assagai_, the name of a like weapon among the Kaffirs of Africa.

[116] This phrase (meaning "nothing paid") is no longer used in
notarial documents. Sometimes when documents are legalized by the
Mexican Legation at Washington, the fee is not paid there, but
is to be paid at Mexico on presentation of the document there;
the secretary of the Legation accordingly writes on it, _No se
pagaran derechos_ - perhaps a similar procedure to that noted in the
text. - _Arthur P. Cushing_ (consul for Mexico at Boston).

[117] This arose from the fact that the Portuguese navigated eastward
from Europe to reach their oriental possessions, while the Spaniards
voyaged westward. The reckoning of the Spaniards in the Philippines
was thus a day behind that of the Portuguese. This error was corrected
in 1844, at Manila and Macao respectively. See vol. i, note 2.

[118] Sevilla, one of the centers of Mahometan power in Spain, was
besieged for more than two years (1246-48) by Fernando III of Castilla,
who finally captured it. The expedition against Tunis here referred to
was undertaken by Cárlos I of Spain (1535). to restore Muley Hassan,
the Mahometan king of Tunis, to his throne, whence he had been driven
by Barbarossa, King of Algiers; the usurper was expelled, after a
brief siege.

[119] This is followed by the certification of the copyist who
transcribed this document for the South American boundary negotiations
between Spain and Portugal in 1776, at Paris. It reads thus: "I,
Don Juan Ignacio Cascos, revisor and expert in handwriting and
old documents, and one of those appointed by the Royal and Supreme
Council of Castilla, made the foregoing copy, and collated it with
the original, which was written on twenty-four sheets of ordinary
paper, and signed, each in his own hand, by Miguel Lopez de Legazpi
and Fernando Riquel. Madrid, the twenty-sixth day of August in the
year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six.

_Juan Ignacio Pascos_."








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Online LibraryUnknownThe Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 — Volume 02 of 55 1521-1569 Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Re → online text (page 22 of 22)