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The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 — Volume 04 of 55 1576-1582 Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Re online

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shall urge him to persevere in the pearl industry. Both from him and
from the inhabitants of Mindanao, you shall ascertain what things
they need from China, so that other methods failing, those articles
may be taken to them from here.

Inasmuch as Captain Esteban Rodriguez brought certain anchors and
pieces of artillery from that island, and did not sound the place where
a ship was lost in a storm from the north, if you have opportunity,
you shall be careful to do so, taking care to return before the season
for sailing is past. On your return you shall see whether Captain
Juan Lopez de Aguirre left any cinnamon because unable to bring it
in the vessels of his fleet.

_Item_: When you return by way of Çubu, you shall bring back all his
Majesty's vessels there, as well as all the artillery left there by
Esteban Rodriguez. You shall bring also a relation of present and
past occurrences there.

You shall try to ascertain whether there is any cinnamon in the
river of Mindanao. If so, you shall try to bring some of it. You
shall try to find out how to treat it, so that it may be of as good
quality as that in Castilla; for his Majesty has had us notified
that that sent from these districts has not been good. On your way
to Çubu, you shall send some one to pacify the tingues [hill-people]
of Butuan and to examine the towns reported by Juan Gutierres Cortes,
in order to discover the people and ascertain their number and their
location. You shall send a cautious man for this, who shall investigate
such matters as are necessary. When you leave Çubu, you shall order
Pedro Navarro to send to this city all his Majesty's ships in that
place, and the artillery taken there by Captain Esteban Rodriguez,
as well as whatever else he has there in his keeping, in charge, of a
careful man. This must be accomplished by the bonancas of April, for
the artillery can be brought more securely then. If any soldier or any
one else should die, you shall make an inventory of his possessions,
and keep the same. You shall note his name and his birthplace, so
that there may be a good account and relation of everything.

Given at Manila, January fifteen, one thousand five hundred and
seventy-nine.

_Doctor Francisco de Sande_

Before me:

_Alonso Beltran_, his Majesty's notary

In the city of Santisimo Nombre de Jesus, in the Filipinas islands of
the West, on the eighteenth day of the month of February, one thousand
five hundred and seventy-nine, the illustrious captain Grabiel de
Rivera - a person who by order and authorization of the very illustrious
Doctor Francisco de Sande, of his Majesty's council, auditor of his
royal Audiencia established in the City of Mexico, and his governor
and captain-general in these islands, is about to go to pacify and
explore the river and island of Mindanao - said that, inasmuch as it is
necessary to appoint a notary for the said expedition, in order that
he may handle and despatch the business that will arise during it;
and inasmuch as Diego Lopez Carreño is a skilful man and qualified
to take charge of this: therefore he appointed, and he did appoint,
him as notary of the fleet and expedition. He authorized him fully,
in so far as he himself is authorized by his Lordship, to enjoy and
exercise this power. He ordered him to take the oath and execute the
formalities required by law, for the exercise of this power. Then the
said Diego Lopez Carreño, who was present, accepted it, according to
the order of the said captain. He took the oath before God and the
blessed Mary, and on a sign of the cross, upon which he placed his
right hand, to exercise the office well and faithfully to the best of
his knowledge and understanding, and to commit no fraud, equivocation,
or deceit; and, if he did thus, may God so reward him; but if not,
then may he be proceeded against.

He affixed his name thereto. Witnesses were Tome de la Ysla, Pedro
Navarro, Grabiel de Ribera.

_Diego Lopez Carreño_, notary

Off the coast of the river of Mindanao, when sailing toward the said
river, on the thirteenth day of the month of March, one thousand
five hundred and seventy-nine, the illustrious captain, Grabiel de
Ribera, met off the coast of the said river, a small boat. His Grace
ordered it brought to the side of the flagship, in order to find
out whence it was coming and whither bound. When it was brought, it
appeared that certain Indians were aboard; through the interpreter,
Miguel Godines, who understands the language of the said Indians,
they said that they were slaves of Limansacay, king of the said river
of Mindanao. The said captain feasted them, gave them some articles
that he had brought in his galley, and ordered the said interpreter to
inform them that he had come by order and authorization of the very
illustrious governor of these islands; that he came in his Majesty's
name to pacify the said land, to pacify and quiet the said natives,
and to make them friends, vassals, and servants of his Majesty, as
are the natives of the other islands. As vassals of King Don Ffelipe,
our sovereign, they would be greatly profited, would be protected and
aided by the said governor, and his Grace would now protect them in
whatever arose and in what they most desired. The reason why he wished
to have peace with him, and with the other chiefs of the said river,
was because his Majesty wished them to understand the great error
and delusion that they labored under, and to recognize their Creator
and Lord, who is the only true God. And because they were Indians who
could not write and slaves of limited understanding, the captain did
not discuss with them more fully his Grace's reason for coming. He
asked them to tell the said Limansacay all the above things, and told
them that they should have no fear or suspicion of any thing, for
his Grace had no authorization to injure or molest them in any way,
but only to entertain and protect the said Limansacay and the other
chiefs of the said river, as had been done in many other districts,
and as is done with all the natives of all the islands. Thereupon the
said Indians went away, without any harm or insult being offered them;
on the contrary they were feasted.

To all of the above I attest, for it occurred in my presence. Witnesses
are Pedro de Oseguerre, Tome de la Ysla, Ensign Melchor de Torres.

_Grabiel de Ribera_

Before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary-elect

Off the coast of the river of Mindanao, four leagues from the said
river, on the fourteenth day of the month of March, one thousand
five hundred and seventy-nine, the illustrious captain Grabiel de
Ribera, sailing toward the said river met a small boat, and in
order to take in water and ascertain their position, ordered it
brought to the flagship. When it was brought, it appeared that it
contained a Boholan Indian, named Umapas, married in the said island
of Mindanao. Two of his brothers-in-law, natives of the said river,
accompanied him. Through the interpreter, Miguel Godines, they were
asked whence they came and whither they were bound. Through the said
interpreter they answered that they were bound for the city of Manila,
at the order of Limansacay, king of Mindanao; and that they were
taking to his Lordship, the governor, two gold-emblazoned daggers,
and two great loaves of wax. Furthermore, the said king ordered them
to collect five taes of gold owed him by some Indians. All this, they
said, was to be given to the said governor in token of recognition and
peace, which they were going, in the name of the said king Limansacay,
to ask from the said governor. Upon hearing this, the said captain
informed the above-named persons that his Grace was going in the name
of his Majesty and by order of his Lordship, in his royal name, to
pacify all that region, and to make peace with all the natives thereof.

Therefore his Grace took them with him to the very mouth of the said
river, and from there despatched the two brothers-in-law of the said
Umapas, who are natives of the said river, in order that they might
advise the said Limansacay, king of the said river, that his Grace
was commissioned by the said governor to treat with him for peace
and alliance, which his father Asututan, now defunct, had requested
from King Don Ffelipe, our sovereign. In consideration of Umapas's
fear and premonition that the king would behead him if he returned,
his Grace despatched the two said brothers-in-law. He ordered them
to tell Limasancay, king of the said river, when they reached his
presence, of the good resolution that his father had taken, and his
great zeal in making peace with his Majesty, and with the governor
in his royal name; that his Grace was ready and prepared to receive
them as vassals of his Majesty, in whose royal name he was come;
and that the king would take them under his royal crown and give
them his royal aid. They would be protected and aided on every
occasion that might arise, and whenever they needed it. In order to
ascertain what were King Limasancay's purposes, and what he intended
to do, his Grace would await a reply to it all, for one natural day
[_i.e.,_ twenty-four hours], anchored at the mouth of the said river
of Mindanao. He ordered all the above to be set down in writing,
that it might stand in the records, and affixed thereto his signature.

_Grabiel de Ribera_
_Miguel Godines_

Before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

On the coast of Mindanao, two leagues, more or less, from the said
river, on the fourteenth day of the month of March, one thousand
five hundred and seventy-nine, the illustrious captain Grabiel de
Ribera ordered that the following instructions be imparted to all
those in charge of the warships taken by the said captain for the
conquest and pacification of the said river and island of Mindanao,
and that they should keep it in its entirety.

First, the fragata acting as flagship shall enter first, having on its
right the other fragata under command of Sergeant Lope de Catalaraga,
and on the left, the two vireys - in order that they may be at hand,
if it is necessary that any message be despatched.

Immediately shall enter successively the two Bornean galleys, in
charge, of Tome de la Ysla and Juan Rodriguez de Norvega, so that,
should it be necessary to fire their artillery, they may do it when the
fragatas discharge theirs, for which I shall have the trumpet sounded.

The two virocos shall form a rear-guard, preceding the other viroco,
which has a lack of men. All of them shall sail as closely together
as possible, and those which sail faster shall await the others,
so that we may all keep in order.

No arquebuse shall be fired unless it is necessary, and no one shall
disembark without my permission and order.

I order you to observe great care in all the above, and even more
in looking after the provisions in your vessels; for we do not know
how long we shall stay in the said river, nor do we know whether we
can procure provisions there, and because of the long distance from
this said river to the town of Santísimo Nombre de Jesus, where we
could find the articles necessary for the support of the said fleet. I
order you to observe and obey all the above, and not to violate these
provisions, under penalty of punishment. I order that all the above
instructions be read to each commander of the said vessels, so that
he may know it.

_Grabiel de Ribera_

By order of his Lordship:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

(On the said day, month, and year aforesaid, I, Diego Lopez Carreño,
notary of the fleet, certify that I read the entire instructions
of the other part of this present to all those commanding the
ships of the said fleet, to each one separately. They all answered
that they were ready to observe and obey the contents of the said
instructions. Witnesses are Tome de la Ysla and Sergeant Catalinaga,
who were present the entire time.

Before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

In the river of Mindanao, at the mouth of the said river, on the
fifteenth of the month of March, one thousand five hundred and
seventy-nine, the illustrious captain Grabiel de Ribera, after having
waited at the mouth of the said river, during the time which he had set
with the two messengers whom he sent to Limansancay, king of the said
river of Mindanao; and seeing that the above-mentioned persons did not
bring any reply to the message that his Grace had sent to the said king
(as is set forth in more detail in a certain writing in regard to this
matter executed before me the present notary, and to which I refer):
notifying and arranging all his fleet, he entered the said river. After
having ascended it for about a league or so, and reached the first
port in the said river which is settled, a chief called Dato Bandel,
accompanied by many Indians, came, bearing a white flag in his hand. He
told the said captain that he wished to make peace and alliance with
his Majesty, and with him in his royal name. That was his intention,
but he was hostile to Limancansay, king of Mindanao, who was settled up
the river. Therefore his Grace took with him the said chief, and after
arriving at the said village - where, he declared, the said Limasancay
lived - he found there certain Indians. He had them summoned, and when
they readied the flagship he embraced and regaled them, and made them
sit down near him. One of them was a chief, who said through Miguel
Godines, interpreter of their language, that his name was Sicuyrey,
and that he was a cousin to the said king Limasancay. His Grace set
this man next himself, and gave him ornaments and presents from among
his store, as well as to the others. His Grace told and informed them
that he was come in the name of King Don Ffelipe, our sovereign, and
by order of the very illustrious Doctor Francisco de Sande, of his
Majesty's council, and his governor and captain-general throughout
these islands, to make terms with Limasancay, king of this river of
Mindanao, for peace and alliance, and that they might become vassals
of his Majesty. He informed them of the great good that would accrue
to them all and to the said Limasancay in particular, if he made the
said peace and alliance with his Majesty, and with the said governor
in his royal name, at whose order his Grace, was come - principally that
they might recognize Jesus Christ, the Creator of the whole world, our
only salvation. This is his Majesty's principal purpose, and he will
entertain and protect them in all things, as is his custom among all
the other natives of these islands who are under his royal crown. In
order to impart this, and many other things, of advantage to the said
Limasancay and to all the natives of this river, it was necessary that
Limasancay come to his Grace. If he feared anything, the captain was
ready to give him whatever security he wished; for he had not come
to molest, but to favor him, according to the orders of the said
governor. Sicuyrey, having been informed of all the above matters by
the interpreter, answered that the said king, Limasancay, was not at
present in that town, but in another, two leagues distant. He said he
would go to him and confer with him in regard to everything that the
said captain had told him; and that he would bring him back with him,
in order that the captain might discuss all those matters. Then they
left, and the said captain said that he would await the answer given
to the, said Sicuyrey by the said Limasancay; and Sicuyrey went away,
together with the others who had come with him. Four hours later,
he returned to the said captain with the news that he had talked to
his cousin Limasancay, and had told him all his Grace's words. He
sent as answer that upon the following day he would come to talk with
him, and that he should await him. Upon receiving this reply the said
captain said he would wait until the following day. He ordered that no
soldier should go ashore or do any damage in the said port to any one,
until the plan and purpose of the said king Limasancay was evident,
and what he would do in regard to the said alliance and peace that
his Grace wished to make with him in accordance with his Majesty's
orders. In order that all the above, and the said captain's great
zeal and resolution in everything concerning these natives might be
properly recorded, he requested me, the present notary, to set it down
in writing, so that everything might stand in the records. I certify
thereto, for it occurred before me, in the presence of the witnesses,
Ensign Melchor de Torres and Pablo de Asequera.

_Graviel de Ribera_

It took place before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

After the above events, on this said day, month, and year above stated,
after all the above had happened in regard to the said chief, the
said captain, considering that the said Dato Bahande had come of his
own accord to make peace, inasmuch as he came with the said flag, his
Grace declared, in the name of his Majesty, and that of the governor
in his royal name, that he received him as his vassal, with all his
subjects - declaring that hereafter they will molest no Spaniard,
will not make war on the Spaniards, and will render assistance in
whatever the governor, or whosoever is authorized by him, shall
order. He said that he was ready to obey. I certify thereto, in the
presence of witnesses Sergeant Catalinaya and Ensign Artiaga.

Before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

While anchored in the river of Mindanao at the port reported to
belong to Limansancay, king of the said river, on the fifteenth of
the said month of March, one thousand five hundred and seventy-nine,
at about four o'clock in the afternoon, or a trifle later, certain
Indians of the small boats carried by the ships of the said fleet
went ashore at the said port, to look for wood with which to cook
their food. It appears that an Indian (from the fragata commanded by
Juan Rodriguez de Norvega) who was a native of the town of Cayut, of
Tome de la Ysla's encomienda, received five wounds from other natives
of the said river of Mindanao who were at the said town - one in the
abdomen, which caused his intestines to protrude, and the rest in his
arms and thighs. The natives of the said river and village inflicted
these wounds on the said Indian treacherously, giving him some buyo,
and while he was reaching for it, wounding him. He died as a result and
was buried in the said village. Although this injury was inflicted on
us, the captain, because he was awaiting the said Limasancay, for the
said peace, ordered all the soldiers and the other Indians of the fleet
not to harm the natives of the said village, until it was seen what
the said Limasancay would do regarding the agreement which he had made
with the said captain. In order that this, as well as the death of the
said Indian and the wounds he had received, might be evident, the said
captain requested me to give him the present writing as certification
and attestation in the manner above stated. Witnesses, Ensign Melchor
de Torres, Pedro de Esequera, and Diego de Artiaga Gamboa.

_Graviel de Ribera_

Before me:

_Diego Lopez Carreno_, notary of the fleet

In the river and village called Mindanao, on the sixteenth of the
month of March, one thousand five hundred and seventy-nine, the fleet
being anchored at the entrance of the said village, wherein it is said
Limasancay, petty king of the said river, usually lives and resides,
at about three o'clock or so in the afternoon, in the presence of me,
the notary, and the witnesses hereunto subscribed - the illustrious
captain, Grabiel de Ribera, being in his flagship - it appears that
Sicurey summoned him from the other side of the river. The said
captain had sent him, one or two days previously, to summon the
said Limasancay. To ascertain the reply of the above king and what
the said Sicurey asked from him, his Grace, accompanied by me, the
present notary and the witnesses, went to an uninhabited house in
the said village and ascended to its top, in order to be able to see
and talk with the said Sicurey - who as above stated was on the other
side of the river with certain Indians who came with him. Through
the interpreter whom his Grace carried he ordered the said Sicurey
to be interrogated concerning the reply that he brought to what the
said captain had sent him to tell his cousin Limasancay; and the said
captain told Sicurey that he should come from the other side of the
river in order that he might talk with him, and ascertain what message
the said Limasancay sent, what was the latter's intention and purpose,
and whether he desired to make the said peace that he had requested
in his Majesty's name. To all of this the said Sicurey answered,
without coming to his Grace, that he had talked to his cousin, the said
Limasancay, who was three days' journey up the river from where the
said captain was stationed; that the said village is called Busayen,
and that he had told the king everything that he had been ordered to
tell. But the king had answered that he was afraid that he would be
seized, and for that reason he would not come to see his Grace; but
he told Sicurey that he should return thanks to the said captain for
the presents which his Grace had given to him and to the others. He
would return to talk again with the said Limasancay, and would again
ask him to come. The said captain told him that, since he was willing
to do him that pleasure, and return again, he should tell the said
Limasancay that his Grace did not come to seize or annoy him; for,
had he wished to annoy him, he would not have asked as he had that the
king come to make peace. The intent of his Majesty, and that of the
very illustrious governor, by whose commission and mandate he comes,
is only to inform the people in that so great river where they are
and live, that they should become vassals of his Majesty, and of the
said governor in his royal name, as the natives of other islands have
done. If he and the other chiefs give obedience to his Majesty, to whom
all render obedience, and are willing to be his vassals and desire to
be protected under his royal crown and favor, his Grace would regale
them and would not molest or annoy them. They could remain in their
own lands and settlement. If they would, of their own volition and
without being forced, give some tribute, his Grace would receive it
in his Majesty's name, and only in token of obedience and so that it
might be understood that they wished peace and were obedient under his
royal crown; that they themselves should decide whatever they wished
to give for this purpose. If the said Limasancay feared, as he said,
that his Grace would seize him, he was prepared to give him any and
all security that he might desire, so that he might come to treat with
the said captain and that he might understand that the latter has no
intention of illtreating him; for if his intention were to molest the
king, his Grace had had occasion therefor already, and could have
seized the said Sicurey and other chiefs who came to discuss peace
with his Grace, as well as a chief called Dato Bahandie. This last
has come peacefully and has rendered obedience to his Majesty; and
in return therefor the said captain has regaled him and will protect
him on every occasion. If the said Limasancay purposes to attempt
treachery and deceit toward the said captain, and in short not to
come peacefully, he shall send word immediately as to his intention;
for, if he do not come peacefully, then his Grace will employ all
the correctives and artifices possible, until he leaves this land
pacified and its inhabitants as vassals of his Majesty. His Grace
has been informed, by natives and chiefs of the said river, that
the said Limasancay is preventing and hindering many chiefs from
surrendering themselves as vassals of his Majesty, by saying that,
if they did, he would persecute and destroy them. Since he prevents
this, and refuses to make friendship, as has been required of him,
and prevents others from doing so, his Grace, as above stated, will
proceed against the said Limasancay by all possible ways and methods,
as against a man who prevents the chiefs of the said river from making
peace and rendering obedience to his Majesty as they wish: his Grace
will also proceed against all his paniaguados, and against all those
who refuse peace and obedience to his Majesty. The said Sicurey having
heard all the above declaration, and other words to the same effect,
replied that he would repeat it all to the said Limasancay, and would
return within three days. Because the said village of Mindanao did


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Online LibraryUnknownThe Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 — Volume 04 of 55 1576-1582 Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Re → online text (page 15 of 20)