Unknown.

The works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 2) online

. (page 1 of 44)
Online LibraryUnknownThe works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 44)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


"^



4




^



N



LIBRARY

; OF THE

Theological Seminar

PRINCETON, N. J.

Hooker, Richard, 1553 or

1600. ^[-(^^^^
The works ^j Q.



Y,



A-



"■ r



A DONATION



deceived ^^ / ( tf^




ip',.^ ;

THE

WORKS

O F

THAT LEARNED AND JUDICIOUS DIVINE

MR. RICHARD^OOKER,

CONTAINING

EIGHT BOOKS

OF THE

Laws

O F

ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY,

AND

SEVERAL OTHER TREATISES.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

"THK LIFE OF THE AUrUOR,



B y



ISAAC WALTON.

ro THIS EDITION IS SUBJOINED

A NEW INDEX TO THE WHOLE.



VOLUME THE SECOND.



OXFORD:

FJIINTBD AT THE CLARENDON PRESS.

MDCCXCIII.







F T H E




O F



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.



B O O K V.

Concernmg their fourth AJfertion, T'hat touch-'
ing fever al pub lick Duties of Chriftian Reli-
gio?i, there is amongjl us 7nuch Superjiition.
retained in them; and concerning Perfons,
which for performance of thofe Duties are en-
dued with the Power of Ecclefajiical Order,
our Laws and Proceedings according thereunto,
are many ways herein alfo corrupted.



The Matter contained in this Fifth Book.

1. ^rue Religion is the root of all true Virtues^ and the^
ftay of all well-ordered Commonwealths,

2. 'The moft extreme oppoftte to true Religion, is affe^ed
Atheifm.

3. Of Superjiition^ and the root thereof , either mifguided
Zealy or ignorant Fear of divine Glory,

VOL. II. B 4. Of



2 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

BOOK V. ^^ Qf lie redrefs cf Superjlition in God's Church j and
' ' concerning the ^ejiion of this Book.

5 . Four general Propofilions demanding that which may
reafondbly he granted, concerning matters of outward
Form in the Exercife of true Religion. And fifthly^
Of a Rule not fafe nor reafonaUe in thefe cafes,

6. The^frji Propojilion touching Judgments, what things
are convenient in the outward fubltck ordering of
Church affairs.

7. The fecond Propofttion.

8. The third Propofition.

9. The fourth Propofition.

10. The Rule of Mens'* private Spirits, not fafe in the/e
cafes to be followed.

1 1 . Places for the publick Service of God.

12. The Solemnity of creeling Churches condemned -, the
hallowing and dedicating of them f corned by the Ad^
verfary.

13. Of the names whereby we diflinguifh our Churches.

14. Of the Fafhion of our Churches.

15. The Sumptuoufnefs of Churches.

1 6. fVhat Holincjs and Virtue we afcribe to the Church,
more than other places.

17. Their pretence that would have Churches utterly
razed.

18. Of publick Teaching or Preaching, andthe firfi kind
thereof. Catechizing.

1 9. Of Preaching, by reading publickly the Books of holy
Scripture, and concerning fuppofed Untruths in thofe
Tranflations of Scripture which we allow to he read ;
as alfo of the choice which we inake in reading.

20. of Preaching by the publick reading of other pro-
fitable InfiruSiions ; and concerning Books Apocryphal.

21. Of Preaching by Sermons, and whether Sermons be
the only ordinary way of teaching, whereby Men are
brought to the faving knowledge of God^s Truth.

22. l-Vhat they attribute, to Sermons only^ and what me
to reading alfo.

23. Of rrayer.

24. Of



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. 3

{14. Of publick Prayer. book v.

25. Of the Form of Common Prayer. •

26. Of them which like not to have any fet Form of
Common Prayer.

27. Of them^ zvho allowing a Jet Form of Prayer^ yet
allow not ours.

28. The Form of €tir Liturgy too near the Papijls, too
far different from that of other Reformed Churches,
as they pretend.

29. Attire belonging to the Service of God.

30. Of Geflure in praying, and of different places chofen
to that purpofe.

3 1 . EafiYiefs of praying after our Form.

32. The length of our Service.

33- In/lead of fuch Prayers as the Primitive Churches
have ujed^ and thofe that the Reformed now ufc \ we
have {they fay) divers ff^ort cuts or fhreddings, rather
Wifhes than Prayers.

34. Lejfons intermingled with our Prayers.

35. The number of our Prayers for earthly things, and
our oft rehearfing of the Lord's Prayer.

3^, The People's faying after the Mimfier.

37. Our manner of reading the Pfaims, other wife than
the reft of the Scripture.

38. Of Miftck with Pfaims.

39- Of finging or faying Pfaims, and other parts of
Common Prayer, wherein the People and the Mimfier
anjwer one another by courfe.

40. Of Magnificat, Benedidtus, and Nunc Dimittis.

41. 0/ the Litany.

42. Of Athanafius Creed, and Gloria Patria.

43. Of our want of particular Thankfgiving.

44. In fame things the ^natter of our Prayer^ as they
affrm, is unfcund.

45. When thou hadft overcome the Jharpnefs of Death,
thou didji open the Kingdom of Heaven to all Believers.

46. Touching Prayer for Deliverance from Judden heath.

47. Prayer for thofe things which we for our unworthi-

nefsy



4 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

HOOK V. nejs, dare nut ajk \ God, for the worthimfs of his Son^
' would voiichfafe to grant.

4^. Prayer to be evermore delivered from all Adverfity.

49. Prayer that all Men may find Mercy ^ and of the
Will of God, that all Men might be faved.

50. Of the Name, the Author^ and the force of Sacra-
ments, which force confifteth in this, that God hath
ordained them as means to make us partakers of him in
Chriji, and of Life through Chrijl.

5 1 . 'That God is in Chrijl by the perfonal Incarnation of
the Son, who is very God.

52. ^he mif interpretations which Herefy hath made of
the manner, how God and Man are united in one
Chrijl.

^2' That by the Union of the one with the other Nature

in Chrifi, there groweth neither gain nor lofs of effen^

tial Properties to either.
54. What Chrifi hath obtained accordiiig to the Flefh^

by the union of his Flefid with Deity.
5^. Of the perfonal Prefence of Chrijl every where, and

in what fenfe it may be granted, he is every where

prefent according to the FleJIo.
56* The Union or mutual Participation, which is be^

tween Chrijl and the Church of Chrifi, in the prefent

World.

57. The neceffity of Sacraments unto the Participation of
Chrijl.

58. The Subjlance of Baptif?n, the Rites or Solemnities
thereunto belonging ; and that the Subjlance thereof
being kept, other things in Baptifm may give place to
neceffity.

59. The Ground in Scripture, whereupon a neceffity of
outward Baptifm hath been built,

60. What kind of necejfity in outward Baptifm hath been
gathered by the 'words of our Saviour Chrijl : and what
the true necejfity thereof indeed is.

6 1 . What things in Baptifm have been difpenfed with by
the Fathers J refpeSiing necejjity,

62. Whether



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. 5

62. Whether Baptifm by Women j he true Baptifm, good r,ooK v.
and effe5lual to them that receive it. '

63. Of Interrogatories in Baptifm j touching Faith, and
and the purpofe of a Chriflian Life.

64. Interrogatories propofed unto Infants in Baptifn^ and
anfweredy as in their names, by God-fathers.

6^. Of the Crojs in Baptifm.

66. Of Confirmation after Baptifm.

6y. Of the Sacrament of the Body and Blood ofChrift.

68. Of faults noted in the Form of adminiflering that
holy Sacrament.

69. Of Feflival-daySy and the natural caufes of their
convenient Inflitution.

70. The manner of celebrating Feflival-days.

7 1 . Exceptions againfi our keeping of other Fefiival-days,
befides the Sabbath.

72. Of Days appointed, as well for ordinary as for ex-
traordinary Fafls in the Church of God.

73. The Celebration of Matrimony.

74. The Churching of Women.
y^. The Rites of Burial.

76. Of the Nature of that Miniflry, which ferveth for
performance of divine Duties in the Church of God,
and'how Happinefs, not external only, hut alfo tem-
poral, doth depend upon it.

77. Of Bower given unto Men, to execute that heavenly
Office, of the Gift of the Holy Ghofi in Ordination ;
and whether conveniently the Power of Order may be
fought or fued for.

78. Of Degrees whereby the Power of Order is difiin-
guifhed, and concerning the Attire of Minifters.

79. Of Oblations, Foundations, Endowments ^ Tithes,
all intended for Perpetuity of Religion ; which purpofe
being chiefly fulfilled by the Clergfs certain and fuf-
ficient maintenance, mufi needs by Alienation of Church •
livings he made fruflr ate.

80. Of Ordination lawful without Title, and without
any popular Ele5lion precedent, but in no cafe without

B J regard




6 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

^ooK y^_^ice^ai^d of due Information what their quality is that
"^'Sj^^' enter into holy Orders.
P "B. X I"? G "iOf'the Learn^g that Jhould he in Minifters, their
Rejidencey and l^e number of their Livings,

TrueRei!- T7^ E W there are of fo weak capacity but publick
foot f a?r 1? ^"^'i^s ^^^y eafily efpy; fewer fo patient, as not
true Virtues to coiTiplain when the grievous inconveniencies
oral! weii^^^hei'eof work fenfible fmart. Howbeit, to fee where-
ovdered jn thc harm which they feel confifteth, the feeds
weaii?""" from which it fprang, and the method of curing it,
belongeth to a fl<:i]l, the ftiidy whereof is fo full of
toil and the pradice fo befet with difficulties, that
wary and refpedlive Men had rather feek quietly
their own, and wifli that the World may go well,
fo it be not long of them, than with pain and
hazard make themfelves advifers for the common
good. We which thought it at the very firft a fign
of cold afFedtion towards the Church of God, to
prefer private eafe before the labour of appeafing
publick difturbance, muft now of necelTity refer
events to the gracious Providence of Almighty God,
and in dilcharge of our duty towards him, proceed
with the plain and unpartial defence of a common
Caufe. Wherein our endeavour is not fo much to
overthrow them with whom we contend, as to yield
them juft and reafonable caufes of thofe things,
which for want of due confideration heretofore they
mifconceived, accufmg Laws for Men's over-fights,
imputing evils grown through perfonal defefts unto
that which is not evil, framed unto fome fores
unwholfome plaifters, and applying otherfome where
no fore is. To make therefore our beginning that
which to both parts is molt acceptable, we agree,
that pure and unrtained Religion ought to be the

higheft



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. 7

highefc of all cares appertaining to publick Regl- book v.
ment, as well in regard of that aid and protedlion p^T — 7^
which they who faithfully ferve God confefs they 2.
receive at his merciful hands, as alfo for the force
which Religion hath to qualify all forts of Men, and
to make them in publick affairs the more fervice-
able i* Governors the apter to rule with confcience;
Inferiors for confcience-fake the willinger to obey.
It is no peculiar conceit, but a matter of found confe-
quence, that all duties are by fo much the better
performed, by how much the Men are more reli-
gious from whofe abilities the fame proceed. For if
•f the courfe of politick affairs cannot in any good
fort go forward without fit Inftruments, and that
which fitteth them be their Virtues, let Polity
acknowledge itfclf indebted to Religion ; Godlinefs
being the Jchiefeft top and well-fpring of all true
Virtues, even as God is of all good things. So
natural is the union of Religion with Juftice, that
we may boldly deem there is neither, where both are
not. For how Ihould they be unfeignedly jufb, whom
Religion doth not caufe to be fuch •, or they reli-
gious, which are not found fuch by the proof of
their juft ad ions ? If they which employ their labour
and travail about the publick adminiftration of Juf-
tice, follow it only as a trade, with unquenchable and
iinconfcionable thirft of gain, being not in heart
perfuaded that || Juftice is God's own work, and
themfelves his Agents in this bufmefs^ the Sentence
of Right God's own Verdid, and themfelves his

* C. Th. lib. xvi. tit. 2. Gaudere et gloriari ex fide femper
volumus, fcientes magis religionibus quam officiis et labore cor-
poris vel fudore noftram republicam contineri.

■f 'Er* ^' a^fv Ef roT; 'C7o?,i]izor; ^vi/cilcv Gr;a|at anv t« 1!Tq7ov tux nvxi,
Xejw ^ oIcK ffTtQVoaiov. To ^i a'lrovoouov ilt/CCi sr' to t«S cfficK; £%«>'. Atlit.

Magn. Moral, lib. i. cap. i.
de Dec. Prscept.

II 2 Chron. xix. 6. A'/cnrr,rov ^}v -yi y<^ln f/.uiicj, y.x-hXiov Si noi-i

BeioTBfov i&Hi, y.xl otoXech/. Arili Ethic. lib. i. cap. 2. Ecclef. xii.
10. Wifd, xvii. 1^.

Prielts



8 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

BOOKV. Priefts to deliver it; Formalities of Juftice do but

■ ferve to fmother Right, and that which was neceflarily

ordained for the common Good is through fhameful
abufe made the caufe of common Mifery. The fame
Piety, which maketh them that are in authority
defirons to pleafe and refemble God by Juftice, in-
fiameth, every way. Men of aftion with zeal to do
good (as far as their place will permit) unto dl.
For that, they know, is moft noble and divine.
"Whereby, if no natural or cafual inability crofs their
defires, they always delighting to inure themfelves
with aftions more beneficial to others, cannot but
gather great experience, and through experience the
more wifdom ; becaufe confcience, and the fear of
fwerving from that which is right, maketh them di-
ligent obfervers of circumftances, the loofe regard
whereof is the nurfe of vulgar folly, no lefs than
Solomon's attention thereunto, was of natural fur-
therances the moft effeftual to make him eminent
above others. For he gave good heed, and pierced
every thing to the very ground, and by that means
became the Author of many Parables. Concerning
Fortitude, fith evils great and unexpe6led (the true
touchftone of conllant Minds) do caufe oftentimes
even them to think of divine Power with fearfulleft
fufpicions, which have been othervvife the moft
fecure defpifers thereof; how fhould we look for
any conftant refolution of Mind in fuch cafes, faving
only where unfeigned afFc6tion to God-ward hath
bred the moft affured confidence to be affided by his
hand .? P'or proof whereof, let but the A6ts of the
ancient Jews be indiflferendy weighed, from whofe
magnanimity, in caufes of moft extreme hazard,
thole ftrange and unwonted refolutions have grown j
which for all circumftances, no People under the
roof of Heaven did ever hitherto match. And that
which did always animate them was their meer
Religion. Without which, if fo be it were poffible,
that all other ornaments of Mind might be had in

their



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. 9

their full perfe6lion, neverthelefs the Mind that book v.
fhould poffefs them, divorced from Piety, could be
but a fpedlacle of commiferation ; even as that Body
is, which adorned with fundry other admirable
beauties, wanted Eye-fight, the chiefeft grace that
Nature hath in that kind to bellow. They v;hich
commend fo "much the felicity of that innocent
World, wherein it is faid that Men of their own
accord did embrace fidelity and honefty, not for fear
of the Magiftrate or becaufe revenge v/as before
their eyes, if at any time they fhould do otherwife,
but that which held the People in awe was the Ihame
of ill-doing, the love of equity, and right itfelf, a
bar againft all oppreflions which greatnefs of power
caufeth: they which defcribe unto us any fuch eflate
of happinefs amongft Men, though they ipealc not
of Religion, do notwithftanding declare that which
is in truth her only working. For if Religion did
poffefs fincerely and fufHciently the hearts of all
Men, there would need no other reftraint from evil.
This doth not only give life and perfeftion to all
endeavours wherewith it concurreth; but what event
foever enfues, it breedeth, if not joy and gladnefs
always, yet always patience, fatisfaction, and reafon-
able contentment of Mind. Whereupon it hath been Pfai. i. 3.
fet down as an axiom of good experience, that all
things religioully taken in hand are profperoufly
ended ; becaufe, whether Men in the end have that
which Religion did allow them to defire, or that
which it teacheth them contentedly to fuffer, they
are in neither event unfortunate.* But lefl any Man
fhould here conceive, that it greatly Ikilleth not of
what fort our Religion be, inafmuch as Heathens,
Turks, and Infidels, impute to Religion a great
part of the fame effeds which omielves afcribe

* Toi/ jS' ui «7ir6wj a'/aGoK xcc^ ifjL(p^ov» 'wcca-cci oloj/.iBx ra? iv/jx-i
rJ^-/j[x.ovuq ^E^siv, y.al Ik T vTruf^ovrm Uii to. y.ci?MTCi 'D^^aTh^o. Arilt.

Ethic, lib. i. cap. 10.

hereunto.



10 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

BOOK V. hereunto, they having ours in the fame deteftation
' that we theirs ; it fhall be requifite to obferve well,

how far forth there may be agreement in the effects
of different Religions. Firft, by the bitter ftrife which
rifech oftentimes from fmall differences in this be-
half, and is by fo much always greater as the matter
is of more importance •, we fee a general agreement in
the fecret opinion of Men, that every Man ought to
embrace the Religion which is true; and tofnun, as
hurtful, whatfoever diifenteth from ir, but that moft,
which doth fartheft diifent. The generality ot which
perfuafion argueth, that God hath imprinted it by Na-
ture, to the end it might be a fpur to our induftry in
fearching and maintaining that Religion, from which
as to fwerve in the leafl points is error, fo the capital
Enemies thereof God hateth as his deadly Foes, Ali-
ens, and without Repentance, Children of endlefs
Perdition. Such, therefore, touching Man's immor-
tal ftate after this life, are not likely to reap benefit
by their Religion, but to look for the clean contrary,
in regard to fo important contrariety between it and
the true Religion. Neverthelefs, in as much as the
errors of the moil feduced this way have been mixed
with fome truths, we are not to marvel, that although
the one did turn to their endlefs woe and confufion,
yet the other had many notable effeds, as touching
BdL Gall. ^^^ affairs of this prefent life. There were in thefe
lib. vi. * quarters of the World, fixteen hundred years ago,
certain fpeculative Men whofe authority difpofed the
whole Religion of thofe times. By their means it be-
came a received opinion that the Souls of Men de-
parting this life do flit out of one Body into fome
other. Which opinion, though falfe, yet entwined
with a true, that the Souls of Men do never perifh,
abated the fear of death in them which were fo re-
folved, and gave them courage unto all adventures.
The Romans had a vain fuperllitious cullom, in moil
of their enterprifes, to conjeiflure before-hand of the
event by certain tokens which they noted in Birds, or

in



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. n

in the intrails of Beads, or by other the like frivo-BOOK v.

lous Divinations. From whence notwithilanding as

oft as they could receive any fign which they took to
be favourable, it gave them fuch hope, as if their
Gods had made them more than haif a promife of
profperous fuccefs. Which many times was the great-
eft caufe that they did prevail, efpecially being Men,
of their own natural inclination, hopeful and ftrongly
conceited, whatfoever they took in hand. But could
their fond Superftition have furthered lb great at-
tempts without the mixture of a true perfuahon con-
cerning theunrefillable force of divine Power ? Upon
the wilful violation of Oaths, execrable Blafphemy,
and like contempts, offered by deriders of Religion,
even unto falfe Gods, fearful tokens of divine Re-
venge have been known to follow. Which occurrents
the devouter fort did take for manifeft arguments,
that the Gods whom they worfhipped were of power
to reward fuch as fought unto them, and would plague
thofe that feared them not. In this they erred. Forwifd. xiv.
(as the Wife Man rightly noteth concerning luch) it ^^'
was not the power of them by whom they iware, nut
the vengeance of them that finned, which punifiied
the offences of the ungodly. It was their hurt un-
truly to attribute fo great power unto falfe Gods. Yet
the right conceit which they had, that to perjury
vengeance is due, was not without good effed: as
touching the courfe of their lives, who feared
the wilful violation of Oaths in that rcfpeCt.
And whereas we read fo many of them fo much
commended, fome for their mild and merciful difpo-
fition, fome for their virtuous feverity, fome for in-
tegrity of life, all thefe were the fruits of true and
infallible principles delivered unto us in the Word of
God, as the Axioms of our Religion, v^hich being
imprinted by the God of Nature in their hearts alfo,
and taking better root in fome than in moft others,
grev/, though not from, yet with and amidft the .
heaps of manifold repugnant errors ; which errors

of



12 ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY.

BOOK V. of corrupt Religion had alfo their fuitable efFeds in

the lives of the felf-fame Parties. Without all con-

troverfy, the purer and perfefter our Religion is, the
worthier effctfts it hath in them who ftedfaftly and
fincerely embrace it, in others not. They that love
the Religion v^hich they profefs, may have failed in
choice, but yet they are lure to reap what benefit the
fame is able to afford j whereas the beftand founded
profefled by them that bear it not the like affeftion
yieldeth them, retaining it in that fort, no benefit.
David was a Man after God's own hearty fo termed
becaufe his afftdlion was hearty towards God. Be-
holding the like difpofition in them which lived under

iChr.xxix. i^jj-,^^ it was his prayer to Almighty God, O keep this
for ever in the purpc/ej and thoughts of the heart of this
People. But when, after that David had ended his
days in peace, they who fucceeded him in place, for
the moft part followed him not in quality, when
their Kings (fome few excepted) to better their
worldly eflate (as they thought) left their own and
their People's ghoftly condition uncared for, by woe-
ful experience they both did learn, that to forfake
the true God of Heaven, is to fall into all fuch evils
upon the face of the Earth, as Men either deflitute
of Grace divine may commit, or unprote6led from
above, endure. Seeing therefore it doth thus appear
that the fafety of all Eftates dependeth upon Reli-
gion ; that Religion unfeignedly loved perfedeth
Men's abilities unto all kinds of virtuous fervices in
the Commonwealth -, that Men's defire in general
is to hold no Religion but the true-, and that what-
foever good elFeds do grow out of their Religion,
who embrace inftead of the true a falfe, the roots
thereof are certain fparks of the light of Truth inter-
mingled with the darknefs of error; becaufe no Re-
ligion can wholly and only confifl: of untruths, we
have reafon to think, that all true virtues are to ho-
nour true Religion as their Parent, and all well or-
dered Commonweals to love her as their chiefeft flay.

2. They



ECCLESIASTICAL POLITY. i^

2. They of whom God is altogether unappre-EOOK v.

hcnded are but few in number, and for grolfnels of ~,^ '

wit fuch, that they hardly and fcarcely feem to hold extreme op.
the place of human being. Thefe we fhould judge I'^^'^V]-
to be of all others mod milerable, but that a wretched- gion, is ■}-
er fort there are on whom, whereas Nature has beftowed f^^^'^'^^'^s-
riper capacity, their evil difpofition ferioufly goeth
about therewith to apprehend God as being not God.
"Whereby it cometh to pafs, that of thefe two forts of
Men, both godlefs, the one having utterly no know-
ledge of God, the other ftudy how to perfuade them -
felves that there is no fuch thing to be known. The
*fountain and well-fpring of which impiety, is a re-
folved purpofe of mind to reap in this World what
fenfual profit or pleafure foever the World yieldeth,
and not to be barred from any whatfoever means
available thereunto. And that this is the very radi-
cal caufe of their Atheifm no M-an (I think) will
doubt, v/hich confidereth what pains they take to de-
flroy their principal fpurs and motives unto all Vir-
tue, the Creation of the World, the Providence of
God, the Refurredion of the Dead, the Joys of the
Kingdom of Heaven, and the endlefs Pains of the
Wicked, yea, above all things, the Authority of the
Scripture, becaufe on thefe points it evermore beat-
cth, and the SouPs Immortality, which granted,
draweth eafily after it the reft as a voluntary train.
Is it not wonderful, that bafe defires fhould fo extin-
guifh in Men the fenfe of their own excellency, as to
make them willino- that their Souls fhould be like to

o ...

the Souls of Beafts, mortal and corruptible with their
Bodies ^ Till fome admirable or unufual accident
happen (as it hath in fome) to work the beginning of
a better alteration in their Minds, difputation about
the knowledge of God with fuch kind of perfons

* Wifd. ii. 21, Such things they imagine and go aftray becaufe



Online LibraryUnknownThe works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 44)