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The works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 3) online

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Online LibraryUnknownThe works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 3) → online text (page 42 of 51)
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another way •, fo there is no incongruity in terming
them right-minded men, whom though God may
charge with many things amifs, yet they are not as
thofe hideous and ugly monfters, in whom, becaufe
there is nothing but wilful oppofition of mind againft
God, a more than tolerable deformity is noted in
them, by faying, that their minds are not right.
The Angel of the Church of Thyatyra, unto whom
the Son of God fendeth this greeting, / know thy

works,



THE NATURE OF PRIDE. 499

workSy and tJjy love, and thy fervice^ and faith i
notwithftanding^ I have a few things againft thee^ was
not as he unto whom St. Peter, i'hou haft no fellow-
fhip in this bufinefs ; for thy heart is not right in the
fight of God. So that whereas the orderly difpofition
of the mind of Man fhouki be thisj perturbation and
fenfual appetites all kept in awe by a moderate and
fober will, in all things framed by Reafon ; Reafon di-
rected by the Law of God and Nature ; this Baby-
lonian had his mind, as it were, turned upfide down.
In him unreafonable cecity and blindneis trampled
all Laws, both of God and Nature under feet; wil-
fulnefs tyrannized over Reafon ; and bruiifli fenfua-
lity over Will : an evident token that his outrage
would work his overthrow, and procure his fpeedy
ruin. The mother whe.-eof was that which the Pro-
phet in thefe words fignified. His mind doth fji^ ell.

Immoderate fwelling, a token of very eminent
breach, and of inevitable dellrudlion : Pride, a vice
which cleaveth fo fafl: unto the hearts of Men, that
if we were to (trip ourfelves of all faults one by one,
we fliould undoubtedly find it the very laft and hard-
eft to put off. But I am not here to touch the
fecret itching humiour of vanicy wherewith Men are
generally touched. It was a thing more than meanly
inordinare, wherewith the Babylonian did fwell.
Which that we /nay both the better conceive, and
the more eafily reap profit by, the nature of this
vice, which fetteth the whole World our of courfe,
and hath put fo many even of the wifcft befides
themfelves, is firif of all to be enquired into: fecond-
ly, the dangers to be difcovered which it draweth
inevitably after it, being not cured ^ and lait of all,
the ways to cure it.

Whether we look upon the gifts of Nature, or of
Grace, or whatfuever is in the world admired as a
part of Man's excellency, adorning his Body, beau-
tifying his Mind, or externally any way commending
him m the account and opinion of Men, there is in

K k 2 every



500 A LEARNED SERMON OF

every kind fomewhat pofTible which no Man hath,
and fomewhat had which few Men can attain unto.
By occafion whereof, there groweth difparagement
neceflarily ; and by occafion of difparagement. Pride
through Men's ignorance. Firft, therefore, although
Men be not proud of any thing which is not, at
at lead in opinion, good ; yet every good thing they
are not proud of, but only of that which neither is
common unto many, and being defired of all,
caufeth them which have it to be honoured above the
reft. Now there is no Man fo void of brain, as to
fuppofe that Pride confifteth in the bare poffefTion of
fuch things •, for then to have virtue were a vice, and
they fhould be the happieft Men who are moft wretch-
ed, becaufe they have leaft of that which they would
have. And though in fpeech we do intimate a kind
of vanity to be in them of whom we fay, They are
wife Men, and they know it -, yet this doth not prove,
that every wife Man is proud which doth not think
himfelf to be blockifh. What we may have, and know
that we have it without offence, do we then make
offenfive when we take joy and delight in having it ?
What difference between Men enriched with all
abundance of earthly and heavenly bleflings, and Idols
gorgeoufly attired, but this. The one takes pleafure in
that which they have, the other none ? If we may be
poITefTed wich beauty, ftrength, riches, power, know-
ledge, if we may be privy to what we are every way,
if glad and joyful for our own welfare, and in all
this remain unblameable-, neverthelefs fome there
are, who granting thus much, doubt whether it may
Hand with humility, to accept thofe teftimonies of
pr.iife and commendation, thofe titles, rooms, and
other honours whtch the World yieldeth, as acknow-
ledgments of fome Men's excellencies above others.
For, inaimuch as Chrift hath faid unto thofe that
are his, The Kings of the Gentiles reign over them, and
they that bear rule over them, are called gracious Lords \
h€ ye not fo : the Anabaptift hereupon urgeth equa-
lity



THE NATURE OF PRIDE. 501

lity amongft Chriftians, as if all exercife of authority
were nothing elfe but heaihenifh Pride. Our Lord
and Saviour had no fuch naeaning. But his Difciples
feeding themfelves with a vain imagination for the
time, that the MefTias of the World fhould in Jeru-
falem eredl his Throne, and exercife dominion with
great pomp and outward ftatelinefs, advanced in ho-
nour and terrene power above all the Princes of the
earth, began to think, how with their Lord's condi-
tion their own would alfo rife ; that having left and
forfaken all to follow him, their place about him
Ihould not be mean ; and becaufe they were many,
it troubled them much, which of them fhould be the
greateft Man. When fuit was made for two by name,
that of them one might fit at his right hand^ and the other
at his left^ the reft began to ftomach, each taking it
grievoufly that any lliould have what all did affecl:
their Lord and Mafter, to correct this humour, turn-
eth afide their cogitations from thefe vain and fanci-
ful conceits, giving them plainly to underftand that
they did but deceive themfelves : his coming was
not to purchafe an earthly, but to beftow an Hea-
venly Kingdom, wherein they (if any) fhall be great-
eft whom unfeigned Humility maketh in this World
loweft, and lealt amongft others : Te are they which
have continued with me in my temptations^ therefore I
leave unto you a Kingdom^ as my Father bath appointed
mCy that ye may eat and drink at my table in my Kingdom y
and fit on jeats^ and judge the twelve Tribes of Ifrael.
But my Kingdom is no fuch Kingdom as ye dream
of; and therefore thefe hungry ambitious conten-
tions are feemlier in Heathens than in you. Where-
fore from Chrift's intent and purpofe nothing is fur-
ther removed, than diQike of diftindlion in titles
and callings, annexed for order's fake unto Authority,
whether it be Ecclefiaftical or Civil. And when we
have examined throughly, what the nature of this
vice is, no Man knowing it can be fo fimple, as not
to fee an ugly fliape thereof apparent many times in

K k 3 rejecling



502 A LEARNED SERMON OF

reie(5ling honours offered, more than in the very ex-
acting of them at the hands of Men. For as Judas
his care for the poor was mere covetoufnefs -, and that
frank-hearted waftefulnefs fpoken of in the Gofpel,
thrifc y fo, there is no doubt, but that going in rags
may be Pride, and thrones be clothed with unfeigned
humility.

We mud go further therefore, and enter fomewhat
deeper, before we can come to the clolet wherein this
poifon lieth. There is in the heart of ev^ery proud
Man, firft, an error of underftanding, a vain opinion
whereby he thinketh his own excellency, and by rea-
foh thereof his worthinefs of eltimation, regard and
honour, to be greater than in truth it is. This
maketh him in all his aftedions accordingly to raife
up himfelf ; and by his inward affedions his outward
a6ls arc fafhioned. Which if you lift to have ex-
emplified, you may, either by calling to mind things
fpoken of them whom God himfclf hath in Scripture
efpecially noted with this fault •, or by prelenting to
your fecret cogitations that which you daily behold
in the odious lives and manners of higrh-minded
Men. It were too long to gather togeth.cr fo plen-
tiful .an harveft of examples in this kind as the lacred
Scripture afrordeth. That which we drink in at our
ears doth not fo piercingly enter, as that which the
mind doth conceive by fight. Is there any thing
written concerning the Afiyrian Monarch in the
tenth of Ifaiah, of his fweiling" mind, his haughty
looks, his great and prefumprucus taunts; By the
power of mine own hand I have done all things^ and by
mine own wifdcm I have jubdued the World? any thing
concerning the Dames of Sion, in the third of the
Prophet Ifaiah, of their flrretched-out necks, their
immodeft eyes, their pageant-like, (lately and pom-
pous gait ? any thing concerning the pradlices of
Corah, Dathan and Abiram, of their impatience to
]ive in fubjeclion, their mutinies, repining at lawful
authority, their grudging againft their Superiors Ec-

clefiaftical



THE NATURE OF PRIDE. 503

clefiaftical and Civil ? any thing concerning Pride in
any fort of fed, which the prefent face of the
World doth not, as in a glafs, reprefcnc to the view ot
all Men's beholding ? So that if books, both profane
and holy, were ail loft, as long as the manners of
Men retain the eftate they are in •, for him that ob-
ferveth, how that when Men have once conceived an
over-weening of themfelves, it maketh them in ail
their affedlions to fwell ; how deadly their hatred, how
heavy their difpleafure, how unappeafable their in-
dignation and wrath is above other Men's, in what
manner they compofe themfelves to be as Hetero-
elites, without the compafs of all fuch rules as the
common fort are meafurfd by ; how the oaths which
religious hearts do tremble at, they affedl as principal
graces of fpeech •, what felicity they take 10 fee the
enormity of their crimes above the reach of laws
and punifhments •, how much it delighteth them
when they are able to appal with the cloudinefs of
their looks ; how far they exceed the terms wherewith
Man's nature fhould be limited -, how highly they
bear their heads over others ; how they brow-beat all
Men which do not receive their fentences as Oracles,
with marvellous applaufe and approbation •, how they
look upon no Man, but with an indirect counte-
nance, nor hear any thing faving their own praife,
with patience, nor fpeak without fcornfulncfs and
difdain; how they ule their Servants, as if they were
beafts, their Inferiors as fcrvanrs, their Equals as
inferiors, and as for Superiors they acknowledge
none ; how they admire themfelves as venerable,
puiflant, wife, circumfped, provident, every way
great, taking- all Men befides themfelves for cyphers,
poor, inglorious, fiily creatures, needlefs burthens
of the earth, off-fcourings, nothing: in a word, for
him which marketh how irregular and exorbitant
they are in all things, it can be no hard thing hereby
to gather, that Pride is nothing but an inordinate
elation of the mind, proceeding from a falfe conceit

K k 4 of



504 A LEARNED SERMON OF

of Men's excellency in things honoured, which ac-
cordingly frameth alio their deeds and behaviour,
unlefs they be cunning to conceal it; for a foul fear
may be covered with a fair cloth, and as proud as
Lucifer, may be in outward appearance lowly.

No Man expedleth grapes of thiitles ; nor from a
thing of fo bad a nature, can other than fuitable
fruits be looked for. What harm foever in private
Families there groweth by difobedience of Children,
ftubbornnefs of Servants, untraclablenefs in them,
who although they otherwife may rule, yet fliould, in
confideration of the imparity of their fex, be ajfo
fubjed; •, whatfoever, by ftrife amongft Men com-
bined in the fellowfhip of greater Societies, by ty-
ranny of Potentates, ambition of Nobles, rebellion
of Subje6ls in Civil States ; by Herefies, Schifms, Di-
vifions in the Church ; naming Pride, we name the
mother which brought them forth, and the only
nurfe that feedeth them. Give me the hearts of all
Men humbled ; and what is there that can overthrow
or difturb the peace of the World? Wherein many
things are the caufe of much evil •, but Pride of all.

To declaim of the fwarms of evils iflliing out of
Pride, is an eafy labour. I rather wilTi that I could
exa(5lly prefcribe and perfuade effedually the reme-
dies, Vv'hereby a fore fo grievous might be cured,
and the means how the Pride of fwelling minds
might be taken down. Whereunto fo much we have
already gained, that the evidence of the caufe which
breedeth it, pointeth diredlly unto the likelieft and
fitted helps to take it away. Difeafes that come of ful-
nefs, emptinefs mufb remove. Pride is not cured but
by abating the error which caufeth the mind to fwell.
Then feeing that they fwell by mifconceit of their
own excellency ; for this caufe, all that tend to the
beating down of their Pride, whether it be advertife-
ment from Men, or from God himfelf challife-
ment ; it then maketh them ceafe to be proud, when
it caufeth them to fee their error in overfeeing the

thing



THE NATURE OF TRIDE. 505

thing they were proud of. At this mark Job, in his
apology unto his eloquent Friends, aimeth. For
perceiving how much they delighted to hear them-
felves talk, as if they had given their poor afflidled
familiar a fchooling of marvellous deep and rare
inftrudiion, as if they had taught him more than
all the World befides could acquaint him with ;
his anfwer was to this effeifl : Ye iwell, as though
ye had conceived fome great matter -, but as for
that which ye are delivered of, who knoweth it
not ? Is any Man i&norantof thefe thing-s ? Ac the
fame mark the bleffed Apoftle drlveth : Te abound in
all things^ ye are rich^ ye reign^ and would to Chrift
we did reign with you : but boaft not. For what
have ye, or are ye of yourfelves ? To this mark all
thofe humble confeflions are referred, which have
been ahvays frequent in the mouths of Saints truly
wading in the trial of themfelves : as that of the
Prophet's, IVe are nothing hut forenefs and fejiered cor-
ruption-^ our very light is darknefs, and our righte-
cufnefs itfelf unrighteoufnefs : that of Gregory, Let
no Man ever put confidence in his own defer ts -, Sordet in
confpe^iu Judicis^ quod fulget in confpe^u operantis ; in the
fight of the dreadful Judge, it is noifome, which in the
doer's judgment maketh a beautiful fliew: that of An-
felm, / adore thee, Iblefs thee^ Lord God of Heaven^ and
Redeemer of the Worlds with all the power ^ ability^ and
Jlrength of my heart andfoul^ for thy goodnefs fo unmea-
fur ably extended; not in regard of my merits^ where-
unto only torments were due, but of thy mere unprocured
benignity. If thefe Fathers fhould be raifed again
from the duft, and have the books laid open before
them wherein fuch fentences are found as this :
Works no other than the value, defer t^ price ^ and worth
of the joys of the Kingdom of Heaven -, Heaven, in re-
lation to our works, as the very flipend, which the hired
labourer covenanteth to have of him whofe work he doth,
as a thing equally andjufily anfwering unto the time and
weight of his travelsy rather than to a voluntary or

bountiful



5o6 A LEARNED SERMON OF

hountiful gift — if, I fay, thole reverend fore-re-
hearfed Fathers, whofe books are fo full of fentences
witnefTing their ChriRian humility, fhouid be
raifed from the dead, and behold with their eyes fuch
things written j would they not plainly pronounce
of the authors of fuch writs, that they were fuller of
Lucifer than of Chrift ^ that they were proud-
hearted Men, and carried more fwelling minds than
fincerely and feelingly knov/n Chnflianity can
tolerate ?

But as unruly children, with whom wholfome
admonition prevaileth little, are notv^ithftanding
brought to fear that ever after which they have once
well fmarted for -, fo the mind which falieth not with
inilrudion, yet under the rod of divine chaftifement
ceafeth to fwell. If therefore the Prophet David, in-
flrud:ed by good experience, have acknowledged ;
Lord, I was even at the point of clean forgetting
myfelf, and fo ftraying from my right mind; but
thy rod was my reformer ; it hath been good for me^
even as much as my foul is worth, that I have been
with farrow troubled : if the bleffed Apoftle did need
the corrofive of fharp and bitter llrokes, left his
heart fhouid fwell with too great abundance of hea-
njenly revelations^ furely, upon us whatibever God in
this World doth or fliail inflidl, it cannot feem more
than our Pride doth exad, not only by way of re-
venge, but of remedy. So hard it is to cure a fore
of fuch quality as Pride is, inafmuch as that which
rootech out other vices, caufeth this j and (which is
even above all conceit) if we were clean from all fpot
and blemifh both of other faults; of Pride, the fall
of Angels doth make it almoft a queftion, whether
we might not need a prefervative ftill, left we Ihould
haply wax proud that v^e are not proud. What is
Virtue, but a medicine, and Vice, but a wound ?
Yet we have fo often deeply wounded ourfelves with
medicine, that God hath been fain to make wounds
medicinable; to cure by Vice where Virtue hath

ftrucken ;



THE NATURE OF PRIDE. 507

ilrucken ; to fufFer the juft Man to fall, that being
raifed, he may be taught what power it was which
upheld him (landing. I am not afraid to affirm it
boldly with St. Auguftin, that Men puffed up
through a proud opinion of their own fandlity and
holinefs, receive a benefit at the hands of God, and
are affiiled with his Grace, when with his Grace
they are not affifted, but permitted, and that griev-
oufly, to tranfgrefs •, whereby, as they were in over-
great liking of themfelves fupplanted, fo the dillike
of that which did fupplant them, may eftablifh them
afterwards the furer. Aik the very foul of Peter,
and it fliall undoubtedly make you icfelf this anfwer;
My eager proceftations, made in the glory of my
ghoflly ftrength, I am afhamed of-, but thofe cryflal
tears wherewith my fin and weaknefs was bev/aikd,
have procured my endlefs joy -, my flrengch hath been
my ruin, and my fall my flay.



A

REMEDY

AGAINST

SORROW AND FEAR,

DELIVE RED IN A

FUNERAL SERMON.



John xIv. 27.
Let not your hearts be troubled, nor fear.

TH E holy Apoftles having gathered themfelves
together by the fpecial appointment of Chrift,
and being in expedation to receive from him
fuch inftrudions as they had been accuftomed with,
were told that which they lead looked for, namely,
that the time of his departure out of the World was
jnow come. Whereupon they fell into confideration,
firft, of the manifold benefits which his abfence
fhould bereave them of; and, fecondly, of the fundry
evils which themfelves fhould be fubjed unto, being
once bereaved of fo gracious a Mailer and Patron.
The one confideration overwhelmed their fouls with
heavinefs •, the other with fear. Their Lord and Sa-
viour, whole words had call down their hearts, raifeth
them prefently again with chofen fentences of fweet
encouragement. My dear, it is for your own fakes

I leave



510



A REMEDY AGAINST



I leave the World ; I know the aflfcdlions of your
hearts are tender, but if your love were direded with
that advifed and ftaid judgment which fhould be in
you, my fpeech of leaving the World, and going
unto my Father, would not a little augment your
joy. Defolate and comfortlefs I will not leave you ;
in fpirit I am with you to the World's end. Whe-
ther I be prefent or abfent, nothing fhali ever take
you out of thefe hands. My going is to take pof-
fefTion of that, in your names, which is not only
for me, but alfo for you prepared •, where I am, you
fhall be. In the mean while, my peace I give ^ not as
the World givethy give I unto you : let not your hearts
be troubled^ nor fear. The former part of which
fentence having otherwhere already been fpoken of,
this unacceptable occafion to open the latter part
thereof here, I did not look for. But fo God dif-
pofeth the ways of Men. Him I heartily befeech,
that the thing which he hath thus ordered by his
providence, may through his gracious goodnefs turn
unto your comfort.

Our Nature coveteth for prefervation from things
hurtful. Hurtful things being prefent, do breed
heavinefs ; being future, do caufe fear. Our Sa-
viour, to abate the one, fpeaketh thus unto his Dif-
ciples : Let not your hearts be troubled \ and to mo-
derate the other, acideth, Fear not. Grief and hea-
vinefs in the prefence of fenfible evils cannot but
trouble the minds of Men. It may therefore feem
that Chrift required a thing impoffible. Be not
troubled. Why, how could they choofe ? But v/e
mud note this being natural, and therefore fimply
not reprovable, is in us good or bad according to
the caufes for which we are grieved, or the meafure
of our grief It is not my meaning to fpeak fo
largely of this affe6tion, or to go over all the par-
ticulars whereby Men do one way or other offend in
it, but to teach it fo far only, as it may caule the
very ApolUes' equals to fwerve. Our grief ajid

heavinefs



SORROW AND FEAR. 5ir

heavinefs therefore is reprovable, fometlme in re-
fped: of the caufe from whence, fometime in regard
of the meafure whereunto it groweth.

When Chrifl, the life of the World, was led unto
cruel death, there followed a number of People and
Women, which Women bewailed much his heavy
cafe. It was a natural compaflion which caufed
them, where they faw undeferved mifefies there to
pour forth unreftrained tears. Nor was this re-
proved. But in fuch readinefs to lament where they
lefs needed, their biindnefs in not difcerning that for
which they ought much rather to have mourned-, this
our Saviour a little toucheth, putting them in mind
that the tears which were wafted for him, might
better have been fpent upon themfelves; Daughters
of Jerufalem, weep not for me, weep for your/elves and
for your Children. It is not, as the Stoicks have ima-
gined, a thing unfeemly for a wife Man to be touched
with grief of mind : but to be forrowful when we
Icaft lliould *, and where we fhould lament, there to
laugh, this argueth our fmall wifdom. Again, when
the Prophet David confefTeth thus of himfelf, 1 grieved ^f^u ixxiu.
io fee the great -profperity of godlefs Men^ how they
flourifh and go untouched, himfelf hereby openeth both
our common and his peculiar imperfe6lion, whom
this caufe fliould not have made lo pcnfive. To
grieve at this, is to grieve where we fhould not, be-
caufe this grief doth rife from error. We err when
we grieve at wicked Men's impunity and profperity,
becaufe their eftate being rightly difcerned, they
neither profper nor go unpunillied. It may feem
a paradox, it is truth, that no wicked Man's
eftate is profperous, fortunate, or happy. F'or what
though they blefs themfelves, and think their hap-
pinefs great ? Have not frantick perfons many times
a great opinion of their own wifdom ? It may be that
fuch as they think themfelves, others alfo do account
them. But what others ? Surely fuch as themfelves
are. Truth and Reafon difcerneth far othervvife of

them.



51^ A REMEDY AGAINST

them. Unto whom the Jews wifli all profperity,
unto them the phrafe of their fpeech is to wifh peace.
Seeing then the name of peace containeth in it all
parts of true happinefs, when the Prophet faith
plainly, That the wicked have no "peace \ how can we
think them to have any part of other than vainly
imagined felicity? What wife Man did ever account
fools happy ? If wicked Men were wife, they would
ceafe to be wicked. Their iniquity therefore proving
their folly, how can we fland in doubt of their mi-
fery ? They abound in thofe things which all Men
defire. A poor happinefs to have good things in
Eceief.vi.z.pofTeflion. A MdJi to whom God hath given riches y and
treafuresy and honour ^ Jo that he wanteth nothing for
his foul of all that it defireth^ hut yet God giveth him not
the power to eat thereof -y fuch a felicity Solomon
cfteemeth but as vanity, a thing of nothing. If fuch
things add nothing to Men's happinefs, where they are
not ufed, furely wicked Men that ufe them ill, the
more they have, the more wretched. Of their profpe-
rity therefore we fee what we are to think. Touch-
ing their impunity, the fame is likewife but fuppofed.
They are ofcener plagued than we are aware of.
The pangs they feel are not always written in their
forehead. Though wicked nefs be fugar in their
, mouths, and wantonnefs as oil to make them look
with cheerful countenances ; neverthelefs if their
hearts were difclofed, perhaps their glittering ftate
would not greatly be envied. The voices that have
broken out from fome of them, that God had given
me a heart fenfelefs^ like the flints in the rocks of Jlone!
which as it can tafte no pleafure, fo it feeleth no woe;
thefe and the like fpeeches are furely tokens of the



Online LibraryUnknownThe works of that learned and judicious divine Mr. Richard Hooker, containing eight books of the laws of ecclesiastical polity, and several other treatises : To which is prefixed the life of the author, by Isaac Walton. To this edition is subjoined a new index to the whole (Volume 3) → online text (page 42 of 51)