Utah. Governor.

Report of the governor of Utah, made to the secretary of the interior, for the year 1878 [-Jan. 4, 1896] online

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tion of its members with the Mormon Church, was a serious obstacle to
a change.

When the majority of a whole people belong to one church and one
political organization, and the church and party influences are the same,
and when political IssuCkS are subject to such influences, it will be readily
'(paderstood that any movement which would lead to a change would be
welcomed by the Liberals. They applauded it as a wise action which
would, if honestly supported, finally bring the Mormon people into har-
monious relations with the Government, and hasten the coming of the
time when legitimate politics wiU be discussed and individuals vote
according to their personal interests and opinions instead of the inter-
ests of an organization, and there existed a general feeling of regret
that they could not see their way clear to disband their own party and
ioin in the national party movement. They were induced to withhold
their acquiescence in the new movement by what seemed to them to be
.prudential and patriotic motives. They reasoned that the change in
'the policy of the dominant party was very sudden, that the interests at
stake were of great importance, reaching so high as to involve our
theory of government, and that patriotism demanded they should sup-
press the natural desire which every American citizen has to act with
his party until time proved the Mormon people had taken the step in
absolute good faith and were ready to accept our system of government
in the same spirit as do the great body of the American people. With-
out desiring to appear unduly cautious, and with a genuine feeling ot
regret, they believed it would be the part of wisdom to wait until the
Mormon people should have some experience in the new political de-
parture. The Mormon people had been banded together so long, in
ties so close, that they appeared to act as one man. Now, they said,
they were going to divide and introduce into their former harmonious
councils the clash of conflicting political interests. This was a crucial
experiment, and the majority of the Liberals felt it was their duty to
wait until it was clear there could be no j)ossibility of their making a
mistake.

There was another strong reason which inspired the Liberals to take
such a course. Many of them would have joined the party movement
but for the fear that behind it there was a deep-laid scheme to obtain
statehood, and it is a singular fact that they suspected the motives of
some of the non-Mormons, who had left the Liberal party, just as strongly
as they did the motives of the Mormons. In other words, the great
majority of the Liberals believe there are men supporting the party
division movement, non-Mormons as well as Mormons, who would sac-
rifice the interests of the Territory and its people to promote the interests
of the party to which they belong.

It is to be regretted that any reason should exist for doiibts as to the
sincerity of a movement which, if upheld in good faith, will result in so
much good to the Territory, or that it should be made to bear the burden
of political schemes.

It was to be expected that the determined policy of the General Gov-
ernment in punishing the practice of polygamy, and in withdrawing
from the people political privileges usually enjoyed by the people of
other Territories, together with the influence of our civilization, would
gradually force the people to make a change, and that whenever the
change would come it would lead to the organization of political parties.



56 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF UTAH.

There is no doubt the mass of the Mormou people have been silently
hoping for snuh a change for many years, and have been waiting for
the opportunity to step out from under the shadow which has so long
darkened their homes. That they have remained passive so long is a
testimony to the force of the influence which religious belief has upon
the minds and actions of men.

I believe the mass of the people have gone iato the party movement
in perfect sincerity, and that it is their present determination not to re-
trace their steps.

What might happen if statehood should soon come and their leaders
should raise the old standard, I can not say; but I believe if sufficieut
time is not given by the Government to enable them to outgroAv the in-
fluences of the past they would submit to the will of their leaders,
because we must not forget that they have been taught to believe and
do believe that when their leader speaks .with a " thus saith the Lord "
he but gives utterance to the will of the Divine Master. It is because
I believe they a re sincere in their profession of religious faith that I
fear what might happen should the power and opportunity be given to
restore the old condition of affairs. We have au illustration of the
power of the priesthood in the recent action respecting polygamy.

The Mormon people hold the key to the situation, and much will de-
pend upon their future conrse. If they act in a manner that will com-
mand confidence th« present opposition will cease. In the mean time
the budding up of political parties in their ranks will lead to the exer-
cise of private judgment and gradually to more independent action, and
result in good to the Territory.

Eyery person who has had the welfare of the Territory at heart has
recognized that an essential requirement to the solution of what has
been termed the "Mormon problem" was the division of the Mormon
people, politically, on the same lines as the people elsewhere divide;
that so long as they were held together by religious ties, which they
deemed superior to their political ties, there could be no improvement
in the situation. In every step which they have taken to destroy this
unity of action they deserve to be encouraged. Certainly, if it is their
intention to meet the demands of the law and conform to our institu-
tions, no man, unless he be destitute of the nobler instincts of his race,
would place an obstacle in their path. I believe it is the intention of
the Liberal party to deal fairly with the Mormon people; to give them
every opportunity to prove their faith by their works ; to ask of Con-
gress no further hostile legislation unless the present attitude of the
majority shall be changed. And, finally, Avhen they can do so consist-
ently with what they deem to be the best interests of the Territory and
its people, join with them in their political organizations, and when that
time comes Utah will stand in complete harmony with the Government
and its people, and show a xirogressive development corresponding with
her natural resoirrces and advantages. In the mean time the Liberal
party wiU maintain its organization and oppose statehood with all the
ability and power it possesses.

STATEHOOD.

I have elsewhere stated the fear of statehood is the principal reason
why the non-JIormon citizens of Utah refused to support the movement
to organize the people on national party lines. They think, or at least
the great majority of them do, that ac^mission now would be a mistake
which can be called nothing less than a political crime. They will re-



REPORT OP THE GOVERNOR OP UTAH. 57

joice to see the day come when Utah can safely be admitted. They
have the interests of the Territory quite as much at heart as have the men
who to further their party interests and their political ambition would
hasten statehood. It is no reflection on the good intentions of the
Mormon people to say that the elitect of statehood now would be to place
the Territory under the control of the Mormon Church, if it chose to
assume control, because its members form a large majority of the whole
people. We ought not expect too much of the Mormon people or put
to too severe a test their abandonment of cherished religious practices.
It should not be forgotten that the Mormons have, during all the years
of their past history, run their religious and political beliefs, and the
local political issues on parallel lines, arid the sole political issue has
been the maintenance of a church doctrine. While the church leaders
have always denied that they influenced or dictated the vote of their
people as churchmen, and claimed that the influence they exercised with
their people was only the same political influence that the leaders of
any political party exercise, stiU, the result is that when a church in-
cludes a whole political party, and, each has the same leaders, and the
reMgious and political interests are blended, it is impossible to draw the
liue between chiu-ch and political influence.

Ordinarily, to make the assertion that in an American community a
church could control the votes of a majority of the people would be to
ascribe too much potency to the influence of the church and too little
to the intelligence and good faith of the people, because we live in a
land where, under constitutional guarantees, there is supposed to be an
effectual divorce of church and state. And yet this has been the exact
condition of Utah in the past. It has been but little over a year since
the first formal announcement was made to the world by the Mormon
people of their intention to renounce what they have said was a vital
principle of their creed, and but little over six months since they for-
mally dissolved the political organization which has been the chief ele-
ment of the strength of the church in its contest with the Government.
Is it unreasonable or unkind to suggest that if the power and oppor-
tunity were given to them to restore polygamy before they had fully
outgrown the influence of the past they might do so? Is it any reflec-
tion on their sincerity to intimate that human nature does not change
by the kind of church it enters ; that they might be like other people
who, in other times, have made all things subordinated their religious
zeal? We must remember that they believe their reward beyond the
grave will be the gVeater if they enter into plural marriage; and while
I believe that polygamy wiU never again be openly practiced in this
land, still I also believe it will be better for the Mormon people, and for
the American people, if the matter be placed as far from doubt as pos-
sible.

It is but natural to expect that for some years to come old influences
will be discernible, and every consideration of prudence and justice sug-
gests that time be given them to complete the work of emancipation.

These appear to me to be the political considerations involved, but
there is the business view to be considered also. Elsewhere I have re-
ferred to the unfortunate condition of Utah in regard to the common-
school fund, a condition that has arisen out of a state of affairs which
were unavoidable. With her schools wholly maintained by a direct tax
and no provision in that respect for the future, the burden of statehood,
with the consequent increase of expenses for the support of the State
government in its legislative, executive, and judicial branches, and for
the registration of voters and the conduct of elections, and the other
10693 6



58 REPORT OP THE GOVERNOR OF UTAH.

expenses now met by the General Government, would, in my opinion, be
too severe for the welfare of the people in the present state of develop-
ment in the Territory, and especially for the agricultural class, who
form, a majority of the people, whose incomes and profits are small, and
whose property can not escape taxation. It is believed that the major-
ity will oppose statehood untU the Territory is more fully developed
and has more wealth. Utah has provided for her insane, for wayward
youths, and for education, by establishing proper institutions, and these
are now being gradually equipped and extended as the revenues of the
Territory will permit. The demands made upon them by these institu-
tions, and the other Territorial, county, and municipal expenses, entail
a heavy annual burden upon the people. ^

Of course, every Territory ought to be admitted into the Union as
soon as possible, consistent with the welfare and needs of the people.
The Territorial system is contrary to the principles upon which our Gov-
ernment was established. It deides to the people living under it any
voice in the affairs of the General Government; but statehood should
never come until aU the conditions which are necessary to build up a
great and patriotic commonwealth are perfectly fulfilled.

UTAH COMMISSION.

It is stated that at the coming session of Congress an effort wiU be
made to abolish the Utah Commission.

The demand will come from persons who have never been in sympa-
thy with the law creating the Commission, or with tlie work of the Com-
mission under the law.

In its sphere the Commission has performed efficient work and has
been a valuable auxiliary to the work of other Federal departments in
Utah. It is well to remember that the non-Mormons of Utah are not ia
sympathy with the demand, but desire that the Commission shall be
retained,

I am, sir, very respectfully,

Aethue L. Thomas,

Oovernor.
Hon. John W. Koble,

Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. G.



REPORT



OF THE



GOVEEI^OR OF UTi^H



TO THE



SEOlaETARY OF THE II^TEBIGR.



18 9 2.



WASHINGTON:

GOVEENMEWT PBrnTINft OFPIOE.
1892.



riTTTTTliiliiXJ i inft



REPORT



OF THE



GOVERNOR OF UTAH



TO THE



SEOEETARY OF THE IJifTERIOR.



18 9 2.



WASHDfGTOK:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1892.



REPORT



THE GOVERNOR OF UTAH.



Territory of Utah,
Salt Lake City, Octoier 1, 1892.
Sir: In compliance with your request of July 21, 1892, 1 have the
honor to submit the following report of the progress and development
of the Territory during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892 :

POPULATION.

Comparative statement of the population of Utah Territory by counties for the years 1890

and 1892. '



Coiinty.



Beaver . .
Boxelder.
Cache —

Davis

Emery —
Grand - • .

Iron

Juab

Kane

Millai-a . .
Morgan . .
Piute*...

Eich

Salt Lake



Census re-
port, 1890.



3,340
7,642

15, 5U9
6,469
2,457
541
2, 683
5,583
1,685
4,0;i3
1,780
2.842
1,527

58, 457



Estimated
population.



3,410
7,805

16,516
6,625
3, OliO
600
2,750
6,200
1. 725
4,000
1.850
2,200
1,000

63, 000



County.



San .Tuan . . .

Sanpete

Sevier

Summit

Tooele

Uintah

Utah

Wasatch . ..
Washington

Wayne *

Weber

Total ..



Census re-
port, 1890.



365
13 146
6,199
7, 733
3,700
2,292
23, 416
4,827
4.009
642
23. 005



207. 005



Estimated

population^

1892.



-iOO

14, 500

7, 20O

8,600

4,000

3,100

27, 500

4,800

4, SSO

9001

27, 50O



223, 930



* Piute County was divided at the last session of the legislative assembly, the eastern poi-tiun being
created into Wayne County.

The above estimate shows an increase of 16,025 since .June 30, 18S0

IMMIGRATION.

The foreign immigration seems to have fallen below the usual average
of other years. The domestic immigration has not equaled that of the
previous year; but there has been a steady growth in the comikerciaJ
and mining centers, and railroad cities and towns.

3



4 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF UTAH. ,

Statement shoyjing the assessed value of the property of the incorporated cities and towns
of Utah Territory, and the indebtedness of same, for the years 11191 and 1892.



Incorporated cities and towns.



Assessed valuation of property,
1891. I 1892.



Cities under special charter.



American Fort ..

Alpine City

Beaver

Brigbaiii City

Cedar City

Coalville.'

Corinne

Ephraim

i'airview

rilhnore

Grantsville

Hyruiri

Kaysville

Lelii City

Logan

Manti

Mendon

Moroni

Mount Pleasant.

Morgan

Ogden

Park Cily

Parowau

Payson

Pleasant Grove .

Provo

Eiclifleld

Kicbmond

Salt Lake City- ..

Smithtield

Spanish Fork- . .

Spring City

Springvillo

St. George

Tooele

"Washington

Wellsville

Willard



CifA:'.s and towns under the general lair.



Bear Kiver

Fountain Green .

Heber

Kanab

Monroe

ITephi

Salem

Salina t

Santaquin t

Elsinoret

Huntington t



Total .



$300,

50,

280,

464,

145,

215,

182,

264,

120,

100,

]50,

.24,

229,

28.J,

1, 85J,

340,

60,

91.

250.

207,

13,243,

1, 800,

108.

308.

350,

3, 152,

177.

146,

57, 965.

192.

237,

80.

680,

252,

151,

42,

93,

98,



000. 00
000. 00
310. 00
160. 00
784. 00
883. SO
000. 00
540. 00
000. 00
000, 00
000. 00
OJO. 00
635. 00
000. 00
000. OU
000. 00
000. 00
284. 00
000. CO
900. 00
965. 00
000. 00

085. 00
500. 00
000. 00
620. 00
600. 00
OOil. 00
668. 00
2] 0.00
750.00
000. 00
000. 00
698. 00
742. 00
800. 82
000. 00

086. 45



22 430. 00
70, 782. 00
(*)

43, 600. 00
75. 652. 00
828, 962. 00
47, 317. 00

■- O

- «)

- (I)

- C)



85, 780, 865. 07



$325,

40,
312,
413,
139,
261,
182,
252,
143,
100,
150,
223,
1, 000,
39.:,
1, 9:i0,
362,

69.

95,

244,

210,

13, 600,

1, 300,

113,

323.

244,

8, 018,

193,

166,

52, 598,

160.

296,

83,
430,
272,
160,

48,
113,
102,



000. 00
000. 00
412. 00
410.00
868. 00
287. 00
235. 00
190. 00
200. 00
000. 00
000. 00
556. 00
OJO. 00
800. 00
842. 00
041.50
500. 00
373. 00
292. 00
000. 00
000. 00
000. 00
950. 00
615. 00
030. 00
646. 00
174. 00
300. 00
395. 00
000. 00
230. 00
0(,0. 00
000. 00
692. 00
804. 00
700. 28
690. 00
156. 75



30, 000. 00
70, 695. 00



Amount of indebtedness.



53, 347. 00
200, 000. 00
779, 854. 00
144. 710. 00
111,272.00

81, 968. 00
106, 450. 00

67, 396. 00



87, 200, 081. 53



1891.



600. 00
600. 00



.■~o». 00
000. 00



$2, 400. 00
100. 00
244.79

None

...do

. . . do

2,

2,

None

1,

None

....do

5,

None

1,

0,

None

...do

...do

...do

25V,

None

None .

....do

1, 970. 00
^' one

300. 00
1, 000, 000. 00

637. 60

None

...do.
, ...do .



000. 00
2i7.'22'



6,

2,

None.

None.

Do.

5,

None.
45,
12,

None.
Do.
Do.

368,1
None.



1, 500. 00
300. 00
911 00

„ 000. 00
450. 00

000. 00
000. 00



306. 00
6110. 00
500. 00



None .
...do .
...do .
.'...do .



, 722. 28



....do .
....do.



None

124, <
None.

1, 500,
None.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2,

None.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Do.
Do.



146. 60
500. 00



200. 00
000. 00



65.00

None

16, 000. 00
100. 00



1, 294, 106. 79



None.

Do.
211, 000. Oo
None.

Do.

Do.

Do.



, 115, 678. 58



* No assessment.

tNot incorporated last year.

J No assessment : separate from county.



The iucrease in municipal indebtedness for the year is 03.3 per cent.
The increase in the assessed valuation of property is l.G per cent.



REPORT OP THE GOVERNOR OF UTAH.



Statement of the reremie from the tax levy for the years 1890 and 1891 for school purposes,



Counties.



Boxelder . .

Beaver

Cache

Davis

Emery

Grarfield...

Grand

Iron

Juab

Kane.'

Morgan . . .
Millard . . .

Piute

Rich

Salt Lake .
Summit . . .



Sanpete

Sevier ,

San Juan

Tooele

Utah

TJintah

"Weber

"Wasatch

"Washington.



Territorial and school
tax.



Total 543,061,



6,

20,

15,

6,

1,

3,

2,

U,

1,

4,

3,

3,

3,

261,

18,

14>

5,

1,

7,

44,

2

73!

5,

4,



847. 19
024. 48
014. 33
813. 55
474. 03
831. 56
812. 10
946. 95
626. 60
873. 97
142. 00
519. 70
026. 93
293. 65
354. 83
974. 13
559. 43
253. 22
382. 43
969. 78
758. 60
910. 23
308. 78
430. 34
Oil. 65



$19, 769. 95

5, 783. 53

30, 863. 60

17, 462. 47

7, 739. 62

3, 054. 68
4, 194. 22
3,481.65

11, 415. 07
2, 316. 52

4, 606. 67

5, 914. 89
2, 444. 30
3,829.15

293, 689. 28,

19, 769. 57'

17, 298. 15.

5,773.48

1.673.36.

7, 751. »T

48, 175. 41.

3,071.81

88, 412. 991

5, 949. la

4, 224. 19



618, 685. la



The increase over 1890 is 10.2 per cent. The revenue for the year at
the rate of half of one per cent, the rate fixed by law, is estimated at
$585,754.49, a decrease of $32,930.70.



statement showing total revenue for each year from 1854, and the total

property from, 1865.



value of



Tear.


Territorial

and
school tax.


Value of prop-
erty assessed.


Tear.


Territorial

and
school tax.


Value of prop-
erty assessed.


1854


$6, 386. 31
17, 348. 89
16,999.38
12, 892. 43
9, 032. 32
9, 957. 17
23, 369. 50
25, 160. 92
47, 795. 18
50,482.00
33. 480. 02
47, 269. 66
52, 338. 98
53, 239. 13
52, 669. 36
59, 968. 03
33, 639. 09
38, 163. 66
43, 976. 40


(')

$3, 469, 770. 00

2. 937, 977. 00

2,578,486.00

(*)
3,982,869.00

4, 673, 900. 00

5, 032, 184. 00
4, 779, 518. 00

548, 200. 00

6, 696, 004. 00
9, 453, 930. 00

10,467,796.00
10, 647, 826. 00

10, 533, 872. 00

11, 393, 606. 00
13,455,636.00
15, 265, 424. 00 ,
17, 590, 560. 00


1873


$53,870.87

67, 021. 45

58, 222. 95

60, 020. 11

56, 384. 15

146, 903. 77

149, 910. 43

151,335.24

153, 495. 40

174,483.93

186, 006. 55

203,549.64

208, 931. 72

214, 105. 93

227,361.48

282, 636. 61

305, 016. 14

543,061.08

618,685.19


$21, 548, 348. 00

{*)
23,289,180.00
23, 608, 064. 00
22, 553, 660. 00

24, 483, 957. 00
24,985,072.00

25, 222, 540. 00
26, 579, 234. 00
29, 080, 656. 00
30,834,425.00
33,924,942.00
34,851,957.00

36, 684, 322. 00

37, 893, 580. 00
46, 868, 247. 00
49, 883, 690. 00

108,612,216.00
123,737,042.00


1855


1874


1856


1875


1857


1876


1858


1877 . . .


1859


1873


I860


1879


1861


1880


1862


1881


1863


1882


1864


1883


1865


1884


1866


1885


1867


1886


1868


1887


1869


1888 ...


1870


1889


187]


1890....-

1891


1872







* No data from which to obtain the amount.



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OP UTAH.
REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY AND IMPROVEMENTS, 1892,



Stntement showing the assessed valuation, of real and personal property and improve-
ments in the several roKidiesfor .



Counties.



Real property.



Beaver*

Boxelder

Cache

Davia

Kmery

GarHeld

G-rand-

Iron

Juab

Kane

JMulard

-Morgan

Piute

JJich

.Salt Lake . . .
San Juan.. . .

Sanpete

Sevier

bumluit

Tooele

Ulutah

Utah

"Waahington.

"Waaatch

"Weber

Wayne



Total 69,168,053.00



$922,

1, 104.

4, 044,

1, 989,

261

71,

t29:

2a3,

696,

61,

238,

319,

9li

488,

33. 103,

1,

1, 932,

493,

1, 023,

522,

180,

C

223,

666,

10, 628,



27C. 00
187. 00
, 077. 00
108. 00
, 650. 00
486. 00
340. 00
136. 00
667. 00
306. 00
949. 00
220. 00
114.00
807. 00
356. 00
600. 00
084. 00
817. 00
771. 00
052. 00
447. 00
tl

396. 00
4u6. 00
143. 00
734. 00



Improve-
ments.



.$370,

1,027,

662,

]7ii,

86,

16,

148,

426,

109,

1, 041,

121,

35,

78,

6, 711,

826,
257,
1, 398,
232,
91,



150. 00
260. 00
095. 00
255. 00
702. 00
075. 00
085. .,0
962. 00
320. 00
741.00
470. 00
146. 00
635. 00
066. 00
600. 00
196. 00
860. 00
938. 00
276. 00
588. 00



Personal prop,
erty.



,$216,

2, 559,

1, 273,

1, 072,

564,

380,

223,

362,

514,

426,

398,

164,

126,

228,

11, 823,

361,

1, 106,

620,

1, 648,

976,

296,



533. 00
474. 00
483. 00
444.00
442.00
769. 00
779. 00
692. 00
lu6. 00
774. 00
257. 00
900. 00
439. 00
336. 00
297. 26
740. 00
193. 00
198. 00
906. 61
439. 22
690. 00



Total.



251, 240. 00

252, 570. 00
3, 629, 777. 00

42, 586. 00



17, 885, 579. 00



456, 248. 00

294, 985. 00

3, 523, 311. 42

2l2, 117. 00



29, 862, 442. 51



$1, 168,

4, 033,

6,344,

3, 623,

996,

637,

268,

743,

1, 537,

597,

1, 678,

6u5,

252,

795,

51, 637,

36J,

3, 863,
1, 371,

4, 071,
1, 730,

668,
10,244,

930,
1, 103,
17, 781,

296,



809. 00
8il. 00
820. 00
647. 00
247.10
946. 00
203. 00
912. 00
744. 00
399. 00
947. 00
5j0. 00
698. 00
778. 00
718. 26
940. 00
473. 00
875. 00
615. 61
766. 22
625. 00
826. 00
883. 00
960. 00
231. 42
436. 00



117, 150, 899. 61



$1, 329,

4, 091,

6, 158,

3, 496,

1, 433,

489,

810,

716,

1, 818,

339,

1, 204,
907,
471,
796,

59, 727,
334,

2, 676,
1,191,
3,961,
1, 375,

629,

10, 367,

852,

1, 192,

18, 047,

(§)



122. 00
248.00
332. 00
436. 00
786. 00
958. 00
032.43
685. 00
666. 00
799. 00
866. 00
720. 00
180. 00
350. 00
472. 94
678. 00
958. 00
916. 00
693. 00
428.00
Ul5. 00
6o7. 00
226. 00
730. 00
000. 00



124, 312, 782. 37



* Includes improvements.



Online LibraryUtah. GovernorReport of the governor of Utah, made to the secretary of the interior, for the year 1878 [-Jan. 4, 1896] → online text (page 36 of 57)