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Transcriber's Note: Table of Contents added.
Where the poem is unnamed, the first line has
been used and noted in lowercase ...
Titled poems in uppercase.

* * * * *


AUNT KITTY'S
STORIES.

175 Illustrations.


* * * * *

CONTENTS

Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep
Hickety, pickety, my black hen
Dickery, dickery, dare
Driddlety drum, driddlety drum
A little pig found a fifty dollar note
This is the way the ladies go
THE MARRIAGE OF COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN
A carrion crow sat on an oak
What a pretty bunch of flowers
This goose got in the house
THE ROBIN IN WINTER
FOUR LITTLE BOYS
THE LITTLE FISH THAT WOULD NOT DO AS IT WAS BID
THOUGHTLESS JULIA
YOUNG SOLDIERS
LEARNING BY HEART
IMPROVEMENT
THE LITTLE COWARD
IDLE CHILDREN
THE LITTLE GIRL THAT BEAT HER SISTER
A VERY GOOD BOY
THE PLUM CAKE
THE GIDDY GIRL
THE FLOWER AND THE LITTLE MISS
THE KITE
Simple Simon met a pieman
I had a little hobby horse
He that would thrive
Tom, Tom, the piper's son
A Farmer went trotting upon his grey mare
Old woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearing?
Little Tommy Tittlemouse
Little Miss Muffett
Eggs, butter, cheese, bread
Rain, rain
Tom he was a Pi-per's son
I had a little dog, they called him Buff
Molly, my sister, and I fell out
Solomon Grundy
Handy Spandy, Jack a-dandy
Go to bed Tom, go to bed Tom
Mary had a pretty bird
Lit-tle boy blue, come blow your horn
I had a lit-tle po-ny
Pe-ter White
See, see. What shall I see?
I had a little hen, the prettiest ever seen
Ride a cock horse
Pus-sy cat ate the dump-lings, the dump-lings
I have a lit-tle sister; they call her Peep, Peep
This lit-tle pig went to mar-ket
One misty, moisty morning
Father Short came down the lane
There was an old woman had three sons
Hink, minx! the old witch winks
CLIMBING ON BACKS OF CHAIRS
THE SQUIRREL
THE SHEEP
A PRESENT FOR ALFRED
THE FAIRING
THE GOOD BOY
MISS SOPHIA
PRETTY PUSS
POLITENESS
MAMA, HOW HAPPY I CAN BE
A FINE THING
SLEEPY TOM
SANDY
THE CARE OF BIRDS
WILLIE WINKIE
COME WHEN YOU ARE CALLED
DOG POMPEY
MISS PEGGY
THE BIRD
THE SETTING SUN
GOOD MAMA
GOOD LITTLE FRED
THE DIZZY GIRL
NEAT LITTLE CLARA
HINTY, MINTY
Come here, my bonnie
CARELESS MARIA
THE PARROT
WHY EMMA IS LOVED
THE GOOD SCHOLAR
NAUGHTY SAM
Two legs sat upon three legs
As I was going up primrose Hill
There was an old man of Tobago
Pease pudding hot
When I was a ba-che-lor, I liv-ed by my-self
To market, to market, to buy a fat pig
Jacky, come give me thy fiddle
Old King Cole
High diddle doubt, my candle's out
Bat, bat, come under my hat
I'll tell you story
My little old man and I fell out
Little Tommy Grace
Pus-sy sits be-side the fire. How can she be fair?
Oh, the rus-ty, dus-ty, rus-ty mill-er
There was a crook-ed man, and he went a crook-ed mile
The Li-on and the U-ni-corn were fight-ing for the crown
Thomas a Tat-ta-mus took two T's
A little boy went into a barn
If all the world were water
Jack be nimble
Cur-ly locks, cur-ly locks, wilt thou be mine?
Mar-ge-ry Mut-ton-pie, and John-ny Bo-peep
Is John Smith with-in?
Old Mother Goose
One, two, buckle my shoe
Jack Sprat could eat no fat
See a pin and pick it up
Leg over leg
There was an old wo-man who liv-ed in a shoe
There was an old woman
We are all in the dumps
Hot cross buns, hot cross buns
See, saw, Mar-ge-ry Daw
Ro-bin and Rich-ard are two pret-ty men
Little Nancy Etticote
See saw, sacradown, sacradown
There was a Piper had a Cow
Sing a song of six-pence, a pock-et full of Rye
A diller, a dollar
Bye, baby bumpkin
As I was going to sell my eggs
Once I saw a little bird come hop, hop, hop
Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going?
Little Robin Red-breast sat upon a rail
Ding, dong, darrow
Pit, pat, well-a-day
Lit-tle Jack Hor-ner sat in a cor-ner
Lit-tle Tom Tuck-er
Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle
A dog and a cat went out together
Little Polly Flinders
Four and twen-ty tai-lors went to kill a snail
A little cock-sparrow sat on a tree
Bless you, bless you, bonny bee
One day, an old cat and her kittens
Doctor Foster went to Gloster
John Cook had a little gray mare; he, haw, hum!
Dingty, diddlety, my mammy's maid
A horse and cart
Who ever saw a rabbit
Boys and girls, come out to play
Jog on, jog on, the footpath way
Hush-a-bye, baby, upon the tree top
DINNER
THE NEW DOLL
GETTING UP
THE LINNET'S NEST
PLAYING WITH FIRE
GRATEFUL LUCY
RUN AND PLAY
THE CUT
SLEEPY HARRY
BREAKFAST AND PUSS
FRIGHTENED BY A COW
THE DUNCE OF A KITTEN
SENSIBLE CHARLES
PUT DOWN THE BABY
DIRTY HANDS
FRANCES AND HENRY
POISONOUS FRUIT
DRESSED OR UNDRESSED
BAPTISM IN CHURCH
THE PET LAMB
Be you to others kind and true
HYMN
TIME TO RISE
FOR NANNIE
THE PUSSY CAT
Give to the Father praise
THE FROLICSOME KITTEN
PENANCE FOR BEATING A BROTHER
THE NEW BOOK
THE DOG
THE COW
THE BUTTERFLY
There was an old wo-man tos-sed up in a bas-ket
To make your candles last for a'
A milking, a milking, my maid
Old father Grey Beard
There was an old woman, as I've heard tell
Bye, baby bunting
Away Birds, away!
Ba-a, ba-a, black sheep
One mis-ty morn-ing
Dee-dle, dee-dle, dump-ling, my son John
Swan, swan, over the sea
I had a lit-tle Hus-band, no big-ger than my thumb
Ma-ry, Ma-ry, quite con-tra-ry
Hey, my kit-ten, my kit-ten
Here we go up, up, up
Some lit-tle mice sat in a barn to spin
Ding, dong, bell, Pus-sy's in the well
As I was going along, long, long
Dance a baby diddit
Hush, baby, my doll, I pray you, don't cry
Jack Spratt's pig
The man in the moon
There was an old wo-man, and what do you think?
A Frog he would a-wooing go
Here am I, little jumping Joan
Jack and Gill went up the hill
Pus-sy cat, pus-sy cat, where have you been?
GOOD NIGHT
HOT APPLE PIE
LUCY AND DICKY
THE FAIRY MAN
COME PLAY IN THE GARDEN
THE UMBRELLA
NO BREAKFAST FOR GROWLER
CLEVER LITTLE THOMAS
SULKING
GIVING WITH PRUDENCE
THE FIELD DAISY
THE MOUSE
SHORT ADVICE
LEARNING TO GO ALONE
CHARITY
FOR A LITTLE GIRL THAT DID NOT LIKE TO BE WASHED
THE SNOW BALL
Jenny Wren fell sick upon a merry time
There was a lit-tle man, and he had a lit-tle gun
Daf-fy-down-Dil-ly has come up to town
Mul-ti-pli-ca-tion is a vex-a-tion
Goo-sey, goo-sey, gan-der, whi-ther shall I wan-der?
Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater
When good King Arthur ruled his land
As I went to Bonner
Pitty Patty Polt
Brow, brow, brinkie
Shoe the wild horse, and shoe the grey mare
Lady-bird, Lady-bird
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Hush-a-bye, baby
Cross patch
Bow-wow-wow
Humpty-Dumpty sat on a wall
The Queen of Hearts
Naughty Willey Bell
The queen of hearts
To market, to market, a gallop, a trot
The North Wind doth blow
When I was a little boy, my mother kept me in
Mary had a pretty bird
Miss Jane had a bag, and a mouse was in it
MAJA'S ALPHABET


* * * * *


[Illustration: "_Little Bo-peep and her sheep, before she lost them._"]

Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And cannot tell where to find 'em;
Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind 'em.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
When she awoke, she found it a joke,
For still they all were fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.

It happen'd one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Unto a meadow hard by -
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks she raced;
And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,
That each tail should be properly placed.




[Illustration]

Hickety, pickety, my black hen,
She lays good eggs for gentlemen;
Gentlemen come every day,
To see what my black hen doth lay.




Dickery, dickery, dare,
The pig flew up in the air,
The man in brown soon brought him down.
Dickery, dickery, dare.




Driddlety drum, driddlety drum,
There you see the beggars are come:
Some are here and some are there,
And some are gone to Chidley fair.




[Illustration]

A little pig found a fifty dollar note,
And purchased a hat and a very fine coat,
With trowsers, and stockings, and shoes;
Cravat, and shirt-collar, and gold-headed cane;
Then proud as could be, did he march up the lane,
Says he, I shall hear all the news.




This is the way the ladies go -
Nim, nim, nim.
This is the way the gentlemen go -
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the hunters go -
Gallop, gallop, gallop.




THE MARRIAGE OF COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


It was on a merry time, when Jenny Wren was young,
So neatly as she danced, and so sweetly as she sung, -

Robin Redbreast lost his heart - he was a gallant bird;
He doff'd his hat to Jenny, and thus to her he said: -

[Illustration]

"My dearest Jenny Wren, if you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cherry-pie, and drink nice currant-wine.

"I'll dress you like a Goldfinch, or like a Peacock gay;
So if you'll have me, Jenny, let us appoint the day."

Jenny blushed behind her fan, and thus declared her mind,
"Then let it be to-morrow, Bob; I take your offer kind.

"Cherry pie is very good! so is currant-wine!
But I will wear my brown gown, and never dress too fine."

Robin rose up early, at the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house, to sing a roundelay.

He met Cock and Hen, and bade the Cock declare,
This was his wedding-day with Jenny Wren the fair.

The Cock then blew his horn, to let the neighbors know,
This was Robin's wedding-day, and they might see the show.

And first came Parson Rook, with his spectacles and band;
And one of Mother Goose's books, he held within his hand.

Then follow'd him the Lark, for he could sweetly sing,
And he was to be clerk at Cock Robin's wedding.

He sung of Robin's love for little Jenny Wren;
And when he came unto the end, then he began again.

[Illustration]

The Bullfinch walk'd by Robin, and thus to him did say,
"Pray, mark, friend Robin Redbreast, that Goldfinch dress'd so gay; -

"What though her gay apparel becomes her very well;
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look must bear away the bell!"

Then came the Bride and Bridegroom; quite plainly was she dress'd,
And blush'd so much, her cheeks were as red as Robin's breast.

[Illustration]

But Robin cheer'd her up; "My pretty Jen," said he,
"We're going to be married, and happy we shall be."

The Goldfinch came on next, to give away the Bride;
The Linnet, being bride's-maid, walk'd by Jenny's side.

And as she was a-walking, said, "Upon my word,
I think that your Cock Robin is a very pretty bird!"

"And will you have her, Robin, to be your wedded wife?"
"Yes, I will," says Robin, "and love her all my life."

"And you will have him, Jenny, your husband now to be?"
"Yes, I will," says Jenny, "and love him heartily."

The Blackbird and the Thrush, and charming Nightingale,
Whose sweet jug sweetly echoes through every grove and dale; -

The Sparrow and Tom Tit, and many more, were there:
All came to see the wedding of Jenny Wren the fair.

[Illustration]

"Oh, then," says Parson Rook, "who gives this maid away?"
"I do," says the Goldfinch, "and her fortune I will pay; -

"Here's a bag of grain of many sorts, and other things beside;
Now happy be the Bridegroom, and happy be the Bride!"

Then on her finger fair, Cock Robin put the ring;
"You're married now," says Parson Rook; while the Lark aloud did sing, -

"Happy be the Bridegroom, and happy be the Bride!
And may not man, nor bird, nor beast, this happy pair divide."

The birds were ask'd to dine; not Jenny's friends alone,
But every pretty songster that had Cock Robin known.

They had a cherry-pie, besides some currant-wine,
And every guest brought something, that sumptuous they might dine.

Now they all sat or stood, to eat and to drink;
And every one said what he happen'd to think.

[Illustration]

They each took a bumper, and drank to the pair,
Cock Robin the Bridegroom, and Jenny the fair.

The dinner-things removed, they all began to sing;
And soon they made the place near a mile round to ring.

The concert it was fine; and every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin, and Jenny Wren the Bride.

[Illustration]

When, in came the Cuckoo, and made a great rout;
He caught hold of Jenny, and pull'd her about.

Cock Robin was angry, and so was the Sparrow,
Who fetch'd in a hurry his bow and his arrow.

His aim then he took, but he took it not right;
His skill was not good, or he shot in a fright; -

For the Cuckoo he miss'd, - but Cock Robin he kill'd!
And all the birds mourn'd that his blood was so spill'd.




[Illustration]

A carrion crow sat on an oak,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do,
Watching a tailor shape his coat!
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do.

Wife, bring me my old beat bow,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do,
That I may shoot yon carrion crow,
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do.

The tailor shot, and he missed his mark,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do,
And shot the miller's sow right through the heart;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do.

Wife! oh wife! bring brandy in a spoon;
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do,
For the old miller's sow is in a swoon;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, he ding do.




[Illustration]

What a pretty bunch of flowers
Little Annie's got
Did they grow in the meadows,
Or in a flower-pot?

[Illustration]

They grew in the wood,
In the deep, deep shade,
Where little Annie plucked them,
And this nose-gay made.




[Illustration]

This goose got in the house,
He'd the courage of a mouse,
So he quacked, and he hissed at the kitten;

[Illustration]

But as she stood at bay,
He quickly ran away;
Afraid of being scratched as well as bitten.




[Illustration]

THE ROBIN IN WINTER.


Little Robin, welcome here,
Welcome to my frugal cheer;
Winter chills thy mossy bed,
Come then daily, and be fed.

Little Robin, fear no harm,
Dread not here the least alarm;
All will share with you their bread,
Come then daily, and be fed.

Little Robin, let thy song
Now and then thy stay prolong;
We will give thee food instead,
Come then daily, and be fed.




[Illustration]

FOUR LITTLE BOYS.


Come, let us play,
Said Tommy Gay;
Well, then, What at
Said Simon Pratt;
At trap and ball,
Said Neddy Hall;
Well, so we will,
Said Billy Gill.

For cakes I'll play,
Said Tommy Gay;
I'm one for that,
Said Simon Pratt;
I'll bring them all,
Said Neddy Hall;
And I'll sit still,
Said Billy Gill.

What a hot day,
Said Tommy Gay;
Then let us chat,
Said Simon Pratt;
On yonder hill,
Said Billy Gill;
Aye, one and all,
Said Neddy Hall.

Come with me, pray,
Said Tommy Gay;
Trust me for that,
Said Simon Pratt;
They eat them all,
Gay, Pratt, and Hall;
And all were ill,
But Billy Gill.




[Illustration]

The Little Fish that would not do as it was bid.


Dear mother, said a little Fish,
Pray, is not that a fly?
I'm very hungry, and I wish
You'd let me go and try.

Sweet innocent, the mother cried,
And started from her nook,
That horrid fly is put to hide
The sharpness of the hook!

Now, as I've heard, this little Trout
Was young and foolish too,
And so he thought he'd venture out,
To see if it were true.

And round about the hook he played,
With many a longing look,
And, Dear me, to himself he said
I'm sure, that's not a _hook_.

I can but give one little pluck:
Let's see; and so I will.
So on he went, and lo, it stuck
Quite through his little gill.

And as he faint and fainter grew,
With hollow voice he cried,
Dear mother, if I'd minded you,
I need not now have died.




Thoughtless Julia.


[Illustration]

Julia did in the window stand;
Mama then sitting by,
Saw her put out her little hand,
And try to catch a fly.

O do not hurt the pretty thing,
Her prudent mother said;
Crush not its leg or feeble wing,
So beautifully made.




[Illustration]

YOUNG SOLDIERS.


Hey, rub-a-dub, dub! here come the boys,
For the Soldiers all make way;
Young Robinet at their head is set
All dressed as warrior gay.

See how he swings his bright tin sword,
To his followers behind;
While from his cap a squirrel's tail
Flies streaming in the wind.

This is good fun, my merry boys,
To see you I am glad;
But mind you, in reality,
War is a business bad. -

Here's old Ben Bolt, a soldier brave,
Who lost his legs in war;
With crutch and cane, he hobbles 'round
And shows you many a scar.

[Illustration]

In scenes of fearful blood and strife,
Ah! many low are lain,
And many a young and gallant heart
Is numbered with the slain.




[Illustration]

LEARNING BY HEART.


'Tis time that my baby should learn
What so oft he has heard, to repeat,
So shall he some sugar-plums earn;
Then let us begin, my Sweet.

For baby is three years old,
And has senses and memory too,
A great many things he's been told,
And he can remember a few.

He can tell me, I know, a few things,
Of the garden, the sky, and the weather;
That a bird has two legs and two wings,
But he cannot say ten lines together.

Then let us, my baby, begin,
And try these few lines here to learn,
It will not be a difficult thing,
And then he'll some sugar-plums earn.




IMPROVEMENT.


Another story, Mother dear,
Did young Maria say;
You read so nice, so loud and clear, -
Another story, pray.

I love that book, I do indeed,
So take it up again;
I think I _see_ the things you read,
You make it all so plain.

[Illustration]

What would I give to read like you,
Why nothing comes amiss!
O, any thing I'll gladly do,
If you will teach me this.

Maria, then, must learn to spell,
If she would read like me;
She soon may learn to read as well;
O, that I will, said she.




[Illustration]

THE LITTLE COWARD.


Why here's a foolish little man!
Laugh at him, Donkey, if you can:
And Cat and Dog, and Cow and Calf
Come, ev'ry one of you and laugh!

For, only think, he runs away,
If honest Donkey does but bray;
And when the Bull begins to bellow
He's like a crazy little fellow!

Poor Brindle Cow can hardly pass
Along the hedge to nip the grass,
Or wag her tail to lash the flies,
But off the little booby hies!

And when old Tray comes running too,
With bow, wow, wow, for how d'ye do,
And means it all for civil play,
'Tis sure to make him run away!

But all the while you're thinking, may be
Ah! well, but this must be a baby.
O, cat and dog, and cow and calf,
I'm not surpris'd to see you laugh,
He's five years old, and almost half!




Idle Children.


Children who with idle habits
From the school-room haste away,
Wishing out of doors to ramble
Ere they do their lessons say -

They shall have no tasks or reading,
But they must to school be sent,
Because they are a bad life leading,
And this shall be their punishment.

But those who quickly say their lessons,
By mama shall still be taught,
And afterwards, nice stories telling,
Shall hear the books papa has bought.




[Illustration]

THE LITTLE GIRL THAT BEAT HER SISTER.


Go, go, my naughty girl, and kiss
Your little sister dear;
I must not have such things as this,
Nor noisy quarrels hear.

What! little children scold and fight,
That ought to be so mild;
O Mary, 'tis a shocking sight
To see an angry child.

I can't imagine, for my part,
The reason of your folly:
As if she did you any hurt,
By playing with your dolly!

See, how the little tears do run
Fast from her watery eye;
Come, my sweet innocent, have done,
'Twill do no good to cry.

Go, Mary, wipe her tears away,
And make it up with kisses;
And never turn a pretty play
To such a pet as this is.




A VERY GOOD BOY.


Mama, my head (poor William said)
So very badly aches,
Tell Brother there, I cannot bear
The tiresome noise he makes.

[Illustration]

I'm sure, said John, if I had known,
Dear Brother, you were ill,
I would have read, or drawn, instead,
And have remain'd quite still.

Good boys, said she, O ever be
Thus kind to one another;
I am, my dear, much pleased to hear
Your answer to your Brother.




[Illustration]

THE PLUM CAKE.


Let us buy,
Said Sally Fry;
Something nice,
Said Betsy Price;
What shall it be?
Said Kitty Lee;
A nice plum cake,
Said Lucy Wake.

A piece for me,
Said Kitty Lee;
A slice I'll take,
Said Lucy Wake;
Give me a slice,
Said Betsy Price;
All by-and-by,
Said Sally Fry.

I'll save some cake,
Said Lucy Wake;
And so will I,
Said Sally Fry;
Well, I'll agree,
Said Kitty Lee;
'Twill do for twice,
Said Betsy Price.

A piece with ice,
Said Betsy Price;
I'll put some by,
Said Sally Fry;
The third for me,
Said Kitty Lee;
The fourth I'll take
Said Lucy Wake.




[Illustration]

THE GIDDY GIRL.


Miss Helen was always too giddy to heed
What her mother had told her to shun;
For frequently, over the street in full speed,
She would cross where the carriages run.

And out she would go to a very deep well,
To look at the water below;
How naughty! to run to a dangerous well,
Where her mother forbade her to go!

One morning, intending to take but one peep,
Her foot slipt away from the ground;
Unhappy misfortune! the water was deep,
And giddy Miss Helen was drown'd.




THE FLOWER AND THE LITTLE MISS.

About getting up.


[Illustration]

Pretty Flower, tell me why
All your leaves do open wide,
Every morning, when on high
The noble sun begins to ride?

This is why, my lady fair,
If you would the reason know,
For betimes the pleasant air
Very cheerfully doth blow.

And the birds on every tree
Sing a merry, merry tune;
And the busy honey bee
Comes to suck my sugar soon.

This is all the reason why
I my little leaves undo.
Little Miss, come wake and try,
If I have not told you true.




[Illustration]

THE KITE.


John White
Flew his kite,
On a boisterous day,
A gale
Broke the tail,
And it soon flew away.

And while
On a stile,
He sat sighing and sad,
Charley Gray
Came that way,
A good natured lad.

"Don't cry;
Wipe your eye,"
Said he, "little Jack;
Stay here;
Never fear,
And I'll soon bring it back."

To the stile,
With a smile,
He presently brought
The kite,
And John White
Thanked him much, as he ought.




[Illustration]

Simple Simon met a pieman,
Going to the fair.
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
"Let me taste your ware."

Says the pieman to Simple Simon,


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