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GRAHAM'S MAGAZINE, JANUARY 1849 ***




Produced by David T. Jones, Mardi Desjardins & the online
Distributed Proofreaders Canada team at
http://www.pgdpcanada.net from images generously made
available by Google Books.





[Illustration: GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE
1849.
DAY ON THE MOUNTAINS.
Drawn & Engraved by W. E. Tucker]

* * * * *

GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE.
VOL. XXXIV. January, 1849. No. 1.


Table of Contents

The Belle of the Opera
What is Beautiful?
Kate Richmond’s Betrothal
The Corsair’s Victim
A Dirge for O’Connell
The Illinois and the Prairies
A Dream of Italy
The Letter of Introduction
Dirge
The Fugitive
The Gentle Step
Barbara Uttman’s Dream
Sunset Upon “The Steine-Kill”
A Song
The Old New House
The Wounded Guerilla
Lines
Speak Kindly
Marie
Love, Duty and Hope
Do I Love Thee?
Ode to Shelley
Marion’s Song in the School-Room
All About “What’s in a Name.”
Game-Birds of America.—No. XII.
Visitants From Spirit-Land
History of the Costume of Men
Maple Sugar
To My Love
Softly O’er My Memory Stealing
Cathara
The Departed
The Dead
The Homestead of Beauty
Gems From Late Readings
Editor’s Table
Review of New Books

Transcriber’s Notes can be found at the end of this eBook.




GRAHAM’S

AMERICAN MONTHLY

MAGAZINE

Of Literature and Art.

EMBELLISHED WITH

MEZZOTINT AND STEEL ENGRAVINGS, MUSIC, ETC.

WILLIAM C. BRYANT, J. FENIMORE COOPER, RICHARD H. DANA, JAMES K. PAULDING,
HENRY W. LONGFELLOW, N. P. WILLIS, CHARLES F. HOFFMAN, J. R. LOWELL.

MRS. LYDIA H. SIGOURNEY, MISS C. M. SEDGWICK, MRS. FRANCES S. OSGOOD,
MRS. EMMA C. EMBURY, MRS. ANN S. STEPHENS, MRS. AMELIA B. WELBY,
MRS. A. M. F. ANNAN, ETC.
PRINCIPAL CONTRIBUTORS.

G. R. GRAHAM, J. R. CHANDLER AND J. B. TAYLOR, EDITORS.

VOLUME XXXIV.

PHILADELPHIA:
SAMUEL D. PATTERSON & CO. 98 CHESTNUT STREET.
1849.




* * * * *

CONTENTS

OF THE

THIRTY-FOURTH VOLUME.

JANUARY, 1849, TO JUNE, 1849.

All About “What’s in a Name.” By CAROLINE C——, 62
A Recollection of Mendelssohn. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 113
A Voice from the Wayside. By CAROLINE C——, 300
Barbara Uttman’s Dream. By Mrs. EMMA C. EMBURY, 43
Christ Weeping Over Jerusalem. By JOSEPH R. CHANDLER, 189
Cousin Fanny. By M. S. G. NICHOLS, 354
Doctor Sian Seng. From the French, 123, 174
Deaf, Dumb and Blind. By AGNES L. GORDON, 347
Editor’s Table, 79, 153, 215,
273, 330, 387
Eleonore Eboli. By WINIFRED BARRINGTON, 134
Fifty Suggestions. By EDGAR A. POE, 317, 363
For and Against. By WALTER HERRIES, Esq. 377
Game-Birds of America. No. XII., 68
Gems from Late Readings, 78, 149, 211
History of the Costume of Men. By FAYETTE ROBINSON, 71, 140, 196,
264, 319
Honor to Whom Honor is Due. By Mrs. LYDIA JANE PEIRSON, 192
Jasper Leech. By B., 15
Kate Richmond’s Betrothal. By GRACE GREENWOOD, 8
Love, Duty and Hope. By ENNA DUVAL, 56
Lessons in German. By Miss M. J. BROWNE, 118
Mormon Temple, Nauvoo, 257
Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson Jones. By ANGELE DE V. HULL, 277
Montgomery’s House, 330
May Lillie. By CAROLINE H. BUTLER, 365
Passages of Life in Europe. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 307
Passages of Life in Europe. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 373
Reviews, 81, 151, 213,
270, 334, 385
Rose Winters. By ESTELLE, 258
Reminiscences. By EMMA C. EMBURY, 325
Speak Kindly. By KATE SUTHERLAND, 53
St. Valentine’s Day. By J. R. CHANDLER, 110
The Belle of the Opera. By J. R. CHANDLER, 1
The Illinois and the Prairies. By JAMES K. PAULDING, 16
The Letter of Introduction. By Mrs. A. M. F. ANNAN, 26
The Fugitive. By the VISCOUNTESS D’AULNAY, 37
The Old New House. By H. HASTINGS WELD, 47
The Wounded Guerilla. By MAYNE REID, 50
The Young Lawyer’s First Case. By J. TOD, 85
The Man in the Moon. By CAROLINE C——, 91
The Wager of Battle. By W. GILMORE SIMMS, 99
The Chamber of Life and Death. By PROFESSOR ALDEN, 129
The Lost Notes. By Mrs. HUGHS, 144
The Naval Officer. By W. F. LYNCH, 157, 223, 286
The Unfinished Picture. By JANE C. CAMPBELL, 182
The Adventures of a Man who could Never Dress Well.
By M. TOPHAM EVANS, 199
The Plantation of General Taylor, 206
The Poet Lí. By CAROLINE H. BUTLER, 217
The Recluse. By PARK BENJAMIN, 232, 298
The Missionary, Sunlight. By CAROLINE C——, 235
The Brother’s Temptation. By SYBIL SUTHERLAND, 243
The Gipsy Queen. By JOSEPH R. CHANDLER, 250
The Darsies. By EMMA C. EMBURY, 252
Taste. By Miss AUGUSTA C. TWIGGS, 310
The Man of Mind and the Man of Money. By T. S. ARTHUR, 312
The Picture of Judgment. By W. GILMORE SIMMS, 337
The Battle of Life. By LEN, 362
The Birth-Place of Benjamin West, 378
The Young Dragoon. By C. J. PETERSON, 379
Unequal Marriages. By CAROLINE H. BUTLER, 169
Western Recollections. By FAY. ROBINSON, 178
Wild-Birds of America. By PROF. FROST, 142
Wild-Birds of America. By PROFESSOR FROST, 208
Wild-Birds of America. By PROF. FROST, 267
Wild-Birds of America. By PROF. FROST, 322
Wild-Birds of America. By PROF. FROST, 382


POETRY.

A Dirge for O’Connell. By ANNE C. LYNCH, 15
A Dream of Italy. By CHARLES ALLEN, 25
A Song. By GIFTIE, 46
A Song. By RICHARD WILKE, 112
A Twilight Lay. By W. HORRY STILLWELL, 128
An Hour Among the Dead. By J. B. JONES, 148
A Billet-Doux. By FRANCES S. OSGOOD, 177
A Summer Evening Thought. By COUSIN MARY, 285
A Sonnet. By FAYETTE ROBINSON, 306
A May Song. By S. D. ANDERSON, 316
Ariel in the Cloven Pine. By BAYARD TAYLOR, 324
Cathara. By WALTER COLTON, U. S. N. 76
Christine. By E. CURTISS HINE, 90
Dirge. 36
Do I Love Thee? By RICHARD COE, JR. 60
Dreams of Heaven. By M. E. THROPP, 378
Earth-Life. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 133
Extract. By HENRY S. HAGERT, 181
Egeria. By MARY L. LAWSON, 195
Florence. By HENRY B. HIRST, 165
Fancies About a Lock of Hair. By S. D. ANDERSON, 207
From Buchanan. By RICHARD PENN SMITH, 297
Human Influence. By MARIE ROSEAU, 191
Jenny Lind. By Miss M. SAWIN, 269
Lines. By R. T. CONRAD, 52
Love. By CHARLES E. TRAIL, 173
Lost Treasures. By P. D. T., 242
Lines to an Idea that Wouldn’t “Come.”
By FRANCES S. OSGOOD, 285
Luna. An Ode. By H. T. TUCKERMAN, 297
Marie. By CAROLINE F. ORNE, 55
Marion’s Song in the School-Room.
By Mrs. FRANCES S. OSGOOD, 61
Maple Sugar. By ALFRED B. STREET, 73
My Bird Has Flown. By Mrs. E. W. CASWELL, 117
My Study. By WM. H. C. HOSMER, 377
Night. By Miss AUGUSTA C. TWIGGS, 372
Ode to Shelley. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 61
On a Diamond Ring. By CHARLES E. TRAIL, 231
Parting. By Mrs. LYDIA JANE PEIRSON, 329
Paraphrase. By RICHARD PENN SMITH, 361
Requiem. By WM. H. C. HOSMER, 109
Rome. By R. H. STODDARD, 234
Reminiscences of a Reader.
By the late WALTER HERRIES, Esq., 249
Raffaelle D’Urbino. By W. H. WELSH, 352
Sunset Upon the Steine-Kill. By KATE DASHWOOD, 46
Summer’s Bacchanal. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 206
Sonnet to Machiavelli. By FAY. ROBINSON, 251
Storm-Lines. By J. BAYARD TAYLOR, 270
Stanzas. By Mrs. O. M. P. LORD, 346
Steinhausen’s Hero and Leander. By H. T. TUCKERMAN, 364
Stanzas for Music. By HARRIET S. HANDY, 376
The Corsair’s Victim. By WM. H. C. HOSMER, 14
The Gentle Step. By HARRIET J. MEEK, 42
To My Love. By HENRY H. PAUL, 73
The Departed. By Mrs. MARY S. WHITAKER, 76
The Dead. By “AN AULD HEAD ON YOUNG SHOUTHERS,” 77
The Homestead of Beauty. By S. D. ANDERSON, 77
The World. By R. H. STODDARD, 89
The Ennuyee. By Mrs. S. A LEWIS, 90
The Mirror of Life. By ANNA, 97
To the Thames, at Norwich, Conn.,
By Mrs. LYDIA H. SIGOURNEY, 98
The Song of the Axe. By C. L. WHELER, 98
The Past. By Miss CAROLINE E. SUTTON, 112
The Phantasmagoria. By A. J. REQUIER, 120
The Beating of the Heart. By RICHARD HAYWARDE, 122
The Highland Laddie’s Farewell. By AUGUSTA C. TWIGGS, 128
The Old Year and the New. By CLARA, 143
The Dial-Plate. By A. J. REQUIER, 168
The Icebergs. By PARK BENJAMIN, 173
The Heart’s Confession. By HENRY MORFORD, 188
The Precious Rest. By RICHARD COE, Jr., 207
The Pine-Tree. By CAROLINE MAY, 210
To My Little Boy. By Mrs. HENRIETTA L. COLEMAN, 212
To Mother. By ANNIE GREY, 231
Thermopylæ. By Mrs. MARY G. HORSFORD, 242
The Unsepulchred Relics. By Mrs. GOODWIN, 249
The Brother’s Lament. By AMELIA B. WELBY, 251
The Unmasked. By S. ANNA LEWIS, 257
The Zopilotes. By FAYETTE ROBINSON, 263
The Rustic Shrine. By GEO. W. DEWEY, 296
The Grass of the Field. By CAROLINE MAY, 309
To an Absent Sister. By MARY G. HORSFORD, 309
Thoughts. By MARIE ROSEAU, 346
Turn Not Away. By HENRY MORFORD, 353
The Sleep of the Dead. By S. G. HAGERT, 361
The New Search After Happiness. By E. FOXTON, 371
Visitants from Spirit-Land.
By E. CURTISS HINE, U. S. N. 70
Vincente Filicaja’s Sonnet to Italy.
By FAYETTE ROBINSON, 384
What is Beautiful? By AUGUSTA, 7


MUSIC.

Softly O’er My Memory Stealing. Words by S. D. Patterson.
Music by John A. Janke, Jr.
The Bells of Ostend. Words by W. L. Bowles.
Music by J. Hilton Jones.
Oh, Have I Not Been True to Thee?
Written and adapted to a beautiful melody
by John H. Hewitt.
Adieu, My Native Land. Words by D. W. Belisle.
Arranged for the piano by James Piper.
Virtue’s Evergreen. Words by Theodore A. Gould.
Music by Theodore Von La Hache.
I Can’t Make Up My Mind. Words from Hood’s Magazine.
Arranged for the piano by C. Grobe.


ENGRAVINGS.

Day on the Mountains, engraved by W. E. Tucker.
The Belle of the Opera, engraved by W. E. Tucker.
The Wounded Guerilla, engraved by Rice.
Oglethorp University, engraved by Rawdon & Co.
A Valentine, engraved by W. E. Tucker.
Home Treasures, engraved by Addison.
The Mirror of Life, engraved by Wilmer.
Portrait of Mrs. Davidson, by Rawdon & Co.
Christ Weeping Over Jerusalem, by W. E. Tucker.
Why Don’t He Come, engraved by Addison.
The Bridal Night, engraved by Addison.
View of the Plantation of Gen. Taylor.
The Gipsy Queen, engraved by Thomas B. Welsh.
The Church of St. Isaac’s, engraved by A. L. Dick.
The Miniature, engraved by an American Artist.
Paris Fashions, from Le Follet.
May Morning, engraved by T. B. Welsh.
View of Tortosa, engraved by J. Dill.
Paris Fashions, from Le Follet.
The Star of the Night, engraved by Addison.
The Cottage Door, engraved by Humphreys.
Col. Washington at the Cowpens.
Paris Fashions, from Le Follet.

* * * * *

[Illustration: OGLETHORP UNIVERSITY, Engraved by Rawdon & Co.]

[Illustration: THE BELLE OF THE OPERA, Engraved by W. E. Tucker.]

* * * * *

GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXIV. PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1849. No. 1.

* * * * *




THE BELLE OF THE OPERA.


AN ESSAY UPON WOMAN’S ACCOMPLISHMENT, HER CHARACTER AND HER MISSION.

BY JOSEPH R. CHANDLER.

[SEE ENGRAVING.]


It is not a small thing to be an engaged writer for a magazine that has
admittance into numerous families, and, by the costliness and adaptation
of its decorations, and the general proclivity of its contents, is in no
small degree the handbook of young females.

A good book, an octavo or quarto, upon sound morals or religious
doctrines comes like a wholesome breeze, “stealing and giving
odors”—but then, like that breeze, it is only occasional—a current
rushing in but rarely, and seldom finding the right object within its
healthful influence. But the magazine is the atmosphere in which the
inmates dwell; they are constantly within its influence, and their
general life, their mental sanative properties become imbued with its
qualities: And this is the more important as the influence is commenced
at home, and upon the female portion; so that it becomes constantly,
permanently, and extensively operative upon, and through others.

The writers for this magazine seem to have been impressed with this idea
of these consequences, and hence the importance of their contributions;
or the editor has been exceedingly careful in his winnowing, to allow
nothing to pass the sieve that might be productive of evil in the field
which he is called to cultivate.

The writer of this article is deeply impressed with the importance of
his position, and the danger of an error. A magazine that is devoted to
taste, the arts and the fashions, it would seem, from the opinions of
some, must be in a great degree light, and in no degree instructive,
save in the very subject of taste, fashion and the arts, to which it is
ostensibly devoted, and according to the general acceptation of the
words, taste and fashion, and the ordinary uses to which the arts are
applied.

“A magazine, then, of polite literature, of the arts and fashions, must
be for the day—must treat of ephemeral subjects—must make the fashions
of female dresses a leading and permanent matter of thought—must
recommend amusements as matters of life-consideration, and erect the
finer arts as an image of universal worship.”

We say plainly that we differ from those who make this estimate of
periodical literature. We cannot consent to such a degrading standard
for the monthly press—we certainly will not submit ourselves or our pen
to this shortening process of the Procrustean bed of literature—we will
do what we can to keep “Graham’s Magazine” from such debasement—we will
do it for the long established character of the periodical, and for what
we think it capable of—we will do it for our own credit—and, most of
all, we will do it for the good of that large portion of society to
which this magazine supplies the mental _pabulum_. When we furnish forth
the table of those who look to our catering, we will take care that
there shall be no poison in the ingredients, no “death in the pot.”

But in a secular magazine there _must_ be light reading—all, or nearly
all, the contents must be of a kind addressed to the fancy as well as
the understanding—and consequently of a character to excite the
censure, or at least forbid the approach, of the ascetic. Nay, it must
greatly differ from the class of periodical literature devoted to, and
sustained upon sectarian religious grounds. The task, the labor of the
magazine editor is to sustain the high moral tone of his work, and yet
have it the vehicle of fashion, taste and the arts—to take the pure,
the good, and the beneficial, and give to them attractions for the young
and gay—or, to take that which is attractive for the young and the gay,
and make it the vehicle of high moral truth—of sober, solid reflection,
the means of heart-improvement, and the promoter of home joys—to
overlay the book with gold, and with sculptured cherubim, and all the
magnificence of taste and ingenuity—but to be sure that within are the
prophet’s rod—the shew-bread of the altar—and the written law of
truth.

Our sense of the duty of a magazine writer of the present time, is
rather hinted at than set forth in the above remarks. The subject is one
that might command the pages of a volume, and if properly handled would
be made eminently useful to writers and to readers. Our attention was
awakened to the subject by an examination of the exquisitely executed
picture of “THE BELLE OF THE OPERA,” with which that accomplished
artist, W. E. Tucker, has enriched the present number of this Magazine.
We do not know that he who drew the figure had such a thought in his
head as the improvement of magazine literature; and it is probable that
Tucker when he exhausted the powers of engraving, or almost all its
powers, to produce the figure, was impressed rather with the importance
of his contribution to the artistic importance of periodicals, than to
the high moral influence which he was aiding to promote. But true
genius, wherever exercised, is suggestive—and the beautifully drawn
figure is as promotive of useful reflection as the best composed essay.
Hence the fine arts and literature are allied—allied in their elevating
influence upon the possessors, and their power of meliorating and
improving the minds of the uninitiated. Hence they go hand in hand in
the path of usefulness—hence they are united in this Magazine.

The Belle of the Opera! Will the reader turn back once more and look at
the picture? How full of life—how much of thought—how
self-possessed—how desirable for the possession of others—how
conscious of charms—and yet how charmed with the tasteful objects
represented.

The Belle of the Opera! To be that—to be “the observed of all
observers,” in a house crowded with objects for observation, to be made
preeminent by exceeding beauty is “no small thing.” It must be
costly—it must demand large contributions from other portions of the
possessor of the proud object. If acres went to enrich the dress of the
ancient nobility of England, something as desirable and as essential to
the possessor, as those acres were to the British nobility, must have
been sacrificed to perfect the attractions of the Belle of the Opera.
Were they social duties? were they domestic affections? were they the
means of womanly usefulness? of healthful and almost holy operation upon
the minds of others? were they prospective or present? is present
moderate but growing happiness sacrificed, or is the present enjoyment
of distinction so great as to balance all of immediate loss, and to make
the sacrifice that of future peace, future happiness, future domestic
usefulness, future social consequence, all that makes mature womanhood
delightful, all that makes age respectable and lovely?

Such reflections and such pregnant queries arise in the mind, when we
contemplate the representation of such loveliness, so displayed. (I
might say such loveliness displayed, for the representation is
loveliness itself.) And the moralist has taken just such a beauty, (if


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Online LibraryVariousGraham's Magazine, Vol. XXXIV, No. 1, January 1849 → online text (page 1 of 21)