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Harper's Round Table, December 24, 1895 online

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And still another variety, or curiosity, has just been noticed. The
left-hand sheet of the present 15-cent stamp (Plate No. 52) is marked on
the margin W. F. G., W. L. C. These initials appear on the upper margin
of the sheet, immediately above the first stamp. To the left, on the
margin, appear the initials C. S. This is another variety easily
obtainable by almost every collector. Of course the stamp must have the
entire margin of the sheet, or, still better, keep the entire strip of
the top row of ten stamps.

This interesting variety was first seen by a gentleman who is not a
collector, but, having unusually sharp eyes, called the attention of a
veteran collector to the same.

Speaking of plate-numbers, which are the fashion at present, reminds me
that the finest collection of these ever made up was exhibited to the
members of the New York Philatelic Society at its last meeting. At the
same meeting another member exhibited his West-Indian, and still another
his Australasian. Each collection was simply superb. Thousands of
dollars were spent in making up the West-Indian and the Australasian
collections to where a hundred had been spent on the plate-number
collection, and yet each collector had something the others had not, and
every one present was greatly pleased by an inspection of all three.

FRED. L. HAWTHORNE, Kingston, Jamaica, wants to exchange stamps,
seeds, etc., with collectors in the U.S.

A. M. J. - Similar questions to yours as to values of coins have
been answered several times. When a coin is so worn that the date
cannot be read it is usually worthless.

J. HALL. - A pair of 20-cent St. Louis stamps was sold for $5000 to
a collector in the East about a month ago.

F. H. CHURCH, Boonville, N. Y., wishes to exchange stamps, birds'
eggs, etc.

F. KELLER. - The 30-cent Ceylon is worth 12c., the 25-cent Straits
Settlements 15c., the 1-cent Shanghai 5c.

S. THOMPSON. - The Department has discontinued all U. S. envelopes
except the 1, 2, 4, and 5c.

J. W. STEVENS. - The 1859 cent does not command any premium.

W. F. SCOTT. - I have sent you a copy of the statutes of the
Philatelic Society, New York, the leading society in this country.
Monaco issues a regular series of stamps.

W. COMFORT. - We do not buy coins. The 1798 cent is catalogued at
20c. The other cent is worth 5c.

J. F. RODGERS. - The 15-cent Columbian, unused, is sold by dealers
at 20c. Used is worth 5c.

PHILATUS.




[Illustration: Ivory Soap]

Have you noticed when discussing household affairs with other ladies
that each one has found some special use for Ivory Soap, usually the
cleansing of some article that it was supposed could not be safely
cleaned at home.

THE PROCTER & GAMBLE CO., CIN'TI.




[Illustration]




CARDS

The FINEST SAMPLE BOOK of Gold Beveled Edge, Hidden Name, Silk Fringe,
Envelope and Calling Cards ever offered for a 2 cent stamp. These are
GENUINE CARDS, NOT TRASH. =UNION CARD CO., COLUMBUS, OHIO.=




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* * * * *

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* * * * *

HARPER & BROTHERS, Publishers, New York




[Illustration: THE DUCK. "SAY, ARE YOU GOING TO HANG UP YOUR STOCKING ON
CHRISTMAS EVE?"

THE STORK. "NAW! I WANT SOMETHING MORE THAN A TOOTHPICK."]




BOBBY'S COMPOSITION.

THE CAT.


The cat is a small animal with four legs and a long tail. The cat is
covered with cat fur. In the night cats love to roost on the back fence.
They roost lengthways of it, instead of cross ways like a bird or a hen.

When the cat wants to say anything it utters a yowl. No other animal
yowls, except a baby, and its yowl is different. Mostly cats make their
remarks in the night. The baby is not different from the cat in this
respect.

Cats have nine lives, but after a cat has lost one of them she isn't
good for much except a cat-skin. If I was a cat I wouldn't be afraid of
dogs.

Cats' eyes shine in the dark. Once I was up in our garret, and saw a
cat's eyes shining. I came down and went to talking to Ma about things.
She said she thought I went up into the garret to stay awhile. I said,
"No, I staid as long as I intended to."

The cat has an Ann Tipathy for rats. Cats eat rats. Tastes differ. The
Chinese make porcelain cats with yellow glass eyes, and put a candle
inside. When the rats see it they go away on the dead run. Of course
there is no danger. I forget what I went up into the garret for that
time.

The middle of cats' eyes gets big in the dark and small in the light.
Girls like cats. A cat goes up a tree frontwards and comes down
backwards. They go up because they see a dog, and come down when the dog
isn't looking. The more dogs a cat sees the bigger her tail gets. The
cats in the Isle of Man don't have any tails, so they are not afraid of
dogs.

Once we had a cat whose eyes got so big in the dark that you'd have been
afraid if you hadn't known what it was. This was the same cat I saw in
the garret. But, pshaw! I knew what it was right away soon as I got
down!

That's all anybody knows about cats.

* * * * *

THE DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS.

UNCLE BOB. "What's the matter, Tommy? What makes you look so gloomy?"

TOMMY. "I don't think Santa Claus is a very sensible man. I'd think any
one with as much sperience wouldn't give little boys pumps when their
mammas wouldn't let 'em put any water in 'em."

* * * * *

THE CONCEITED COW.

A haughty cow unto a horse
Remarked, "Why cannot we,
And only we two, practise for
A dual jubilee?
My bass profound is faultless,
While your tenor tremulo
Is heavenly; and our duet
Would please our master so."
With pleading moo she urged her case,
Then sadly turned away,
For the horse looked up disdainfully,
And only answered "Neigh!"

* * * * *

"Oh, mamma!" exclaimed Bobby, "I've thought of the awfulest, dreadfulest
thing. Suppose our chimney should catch fire Christmas eve?"

* * * * *

BOBBY. "Mamma, I don't want any fire in my room to-night."

MAMMA. "Why, you'll freeze."

BOBBY. "I don't mind being cold, but if you leave the fire burn, Santa
Claus won't be able to come down the chimney."

* * * * *

JACK (_to friend on bicycle_). "What's your hurry; are you racing for a
train?"

JOE. "No; I'm training for a race."

* * * * *

BOBBY TAKES TO JOKING.

BOBBY. "I don't see why they talk about the 'Forty Thieves' in the
_Arabian Nights_."

MAMMA. "Why not?"

BOBBY. "'Cos they acted like sixty."

* * * * *

[Illustration: A CHRISTMAS STOC-KING.]







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Online LibraryVariousHarper's Round Table, December 24, 1895 → online text (page 7 of 7)