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are stated to be his, and not the lion rampant of the Jennings of
Shropshire. This seems to support the hypothesis that William Jennings, the
sheriff, was the same family. The _Spoure_ MSS. also mention "Ursula,
sister of Sir William Walrond of Bradfield, Devon, who married first,
William Jennings of _Plymouth_ (query, the sheriff?), and afterwards the
Rev. William Croker, Rector of Wolfrey (Wolfardisworthy?) Devon."

PERCURIOSUS.

_Adamson's "England's Defence"_ (Vol. vi., p. 580.) is well worth attention
at the present time; as is also its synopsis before publication, annexed to
_Stratisticos, by John Digges, Muster Master_, &c., 4to., 1590, and filling
pp. 369. to 380. of that curious work, showing the wisdom of our ancestors
on the subject of invasion by foreigners.

E. D.

_Chief Justice Thomas Wood_ (Vol. vii., p. 14.). - In Berry's _Hampshire
Visitation_ (p. 71.), Thomas Wood is mentioned as having married a daughter
of Sir Thomas de la More, and as having had a daughter named Elizabeth, who
married Sir Thomas Stewkley of Aston, Devon, knight.

I am as anxious as N. C. L. to know something about Thomas Wood's lineage;
and shall be obliged by his telling me where it is said that he built Hall
O'Wood.

EDWARD FOSS.

_Aldiborontiphoscophornio_ (Vol. vii., p. 40.). - This euphonious and
formidable name will be found in _The Most Tragical Tragedy that ever was
Tragidized by any Company of Tragedians_, viz., _Chrononhotonthologos_,
written by "Honest merry Harry Carey," who wrote also _The Dragon of
Wantley_, a burlesque opera (founded on the old ballad of that name), _The
Dragoness_ (a sequel to _The Dragon_), &c. &c. While the public were
applauding his dramatic drolleries and beautiful ballads (of which the most
beautiful is "Sally in our Alley"), their unhappy author, in a fit of
despondency, destroyed himself at his lodgings in Warner Street,
Clerkenwell. There is an engraving by Faber, in 1729, of Harry Carey, from
a painting by Worsdale (the celebrated Jemmy!); which is rare.

GEORGE DANIEL.

[We are indebted to several other correspondents for replies to the
Query of F. R. S.]

{96}

_Statue of St Peter at Rome_ (Vol. vi., p. 604.). - This well-known bronze
statue is falsely stated to be a Jupiter converted. It is very far from
being true, though popularly it passes as truth, that the statue in
question is the ancient statue of Jupiter Capitolinus, with certain
alterations.

Another commonly-received opinion regarding this statue is, that it was
cast for a St. Peter, _but of the metal of the statue of Jupiter
Capitolinus_. But this can scarcely be true, for Martial informs us that in
his own time the statue of the Capitoline Jupiter was not of bronze but of
_gold_.

"Scriptus et æterno nunc primum Jupiter _auro_."
Lib. xi. Ep. iv.

Undoubtedly the statue was cast for a St. Peter. It was cast in the time of
St. Leo the Great (440-461), and belonged to the ancient church of St.
Peter's. St. Peter has the nimbus on his head; the first two fingers of the
right hand are raised in the act of benediction; the left hand holds the
keys, and the right foot projects from the pedestal. The statue is seated
on a pontifical chair of white marble.

CEYREP.

_Old Silver Ornament_ (Vol. vi., p. 602.). - This ornament is very probably
what your correspondent infers it is, - a portion of some military
accoutrement: if so, it may have appertained to some Scotch regiment. It
represents precisely the badge worn by the baronets of Nova Scotia, the
device upon which was the saltier of St. Andrew, with the royal arms of
Scotland on an escutcheon in the centre; the whole surrounded by the motto,
and ensigned with the royal crown. The insignia of the British orders of
knighthood are frequently represented in the ornaments upon the military
accoutrements of the present day.

EBOR.

"_Plurima, pauca, nihil_," (Vol. vi., p. 511.). - A correspondent asks for
the first part of an epigram which ends with the words "plurima, pauca,
nihil." He is referred to an epigram of Martial, which _I_ cannot find. But
I chance to remember two epigrams which were affixed to the statue of
Pasquin at Rome, in the year 1820, upon two Cardinals who were candidates
for the Popedom. They run as follows, and are smart enough to be worth
preserving:

"PASQUINALIA.

"Sit bonus, et fortasse pius - sed semper ineptus -
Vult, meditatur, agit, _plurima, pauca, nihil_."

"IN ALTERUM.

"Promittit, promissa negat, ploratque negata,
Hæc tria si junges, quis neget esse Petrum."

A. BORDERER.

_"Pork-pisee" and "Wheale"_ (Vol. vi., p. 579.). - Has not MR. WARDE, in his
second quotation, copied the word wrongly - "pork-pisee" for pork-_pesse_? A
porpoise is the creature alluded to; or _porpesse_, as some modern
naturalists spell it. "Wheale" evidently means _whey_: the former
expression is probably a provincialism.

JAYDEE.

_Did the Carians use Heraldic Devices?_ (Vol. vi., p. 556.). - Perhaps the
following, from an heraldic work of Dr. Bernd, professor at the University
of Bonn, may serve to answer the Queries of MR. BOOKER.

Herodotus ascribes the first use, or, as he expresses it, the invention of
signs on shields, which we call arms, and of the supporter or handle of the
shield, which till then had been suspended by straps from the neck, as well
as of the tuft of feathers or horse-hair on the helmet, to the Carians; in
which Strabo agrees with him, and, as far as regards the supporters and
crest, Ælian also:

"Herodot schrieb den ersten Gebrauch, oder wie er sich ausdrückt, die
Erfindung der Zeichen auf Schilden, die wir Wappen nennen, wie auch der
Halter oder Handhaben an den Schilden, die bis dahin nur an Riemen um
den Nacken getragen wurden, und die Büsche von Federn oder Rosshaaren
auf den Helmen, den Cariern zu, worin ihm Strabo (_Geogr._ 14. I. §
27.), und was die Handhaben und Helmbüsche betrifft, auch Ælian (_Hist.
Animal._ 12. 30.), beistimmen." - Bernd's _Wappenwissen der Griechen und
Römer_, p. 4. Bonn, 1841.

On Thucydides i. 8., where mention is made of Carians disinterred by the
Athenians in the island of Delos, the scholiast, evidently referring to the
passage cited by MR. BOOKER, says:

[Greek: Kares prôtoi heuron tous omphalous tôn aspidôn, kai tous
lophous. tois oun apothnêskousi sunethapton aspidiskion mikron kai
lophon, sêmeion tês heureseôs.]

From Plutarch's _Artaxerxes_ (10.) may be inferred, that the Carian
standard was a cock; for the king presented the Carian who slew Cyrus with
a golden one, to be thenceforth carried at the head of the troop.

For full information on the heraldry of the ancients, your correspondent
can scarcely do better than consult the above-quoted work of Dr. Bernd.

JOHN SCOTT.

Norwich.

_Herbert Family_ (Vol. vi., p. 473.). - The celebrated picture of Lord
Herbert of Cherbury by Isaac Oliver, at Penshurst, represents him with a
small swarthy countenance, dark eyes, very dark black hair, and mustachios.
All the Herberts whom I have seen are dark-complexioned and black-haired.
This is the family badge, quite as much as the unmistakeable nose in the
descendants of John of Gaunt.

E. D.

_Children crying at Baptism_ (Vol. vi., p. 601.). - I am inclined to suspect
that the idea of its being lucky for a child to cry at baptism arose {97}
from the custom of _exorcism_, which was retained in the Anglican Church in
the First Prayer-Book of King Edward VI., and is still commonly observed in
the baptismal services of the Church of Rome. When the devil was going out
of the possessed person, he was supposed to do so with reluctance: "The
spirit cried, and rent him sore, and came out of him: and he was as one
dead; insomuch that many said, He is dead." (St. Mark, ix. 26.) The tears
and struggles of the infant would therefore be a convincing proof that the
Evil One had departed. In Ireland (as every clergyman knows) nurses will
decide the matter by pinching the baby, rather than allow him to remain
silent and unlachrymose.

RT.

Warmington.

_Americanisms_ (Vol. vi., p. 554.). - The word _bottom_, applied as your
correspondent UNEDA remarks, is decidedly an English provincialism, of
constant use now in the clothing districts of Gloucestershire, which are
called "The Bottoms," whether mills are situated there or not.

E. D.

_Dutch Allegorical Picture_ (Vol. vi., p. 457.). - In the account I gave you
of this picture I omitted one of the inscriptions, which I but just
discovered; and as the picture appears to have excited some interest in
Holland (my account of it having been translated into Dutch[9], in the
_Navorscher_), I send you this further supplemental notice.

I described a table standing under the window, on the left-hand side of the
room, containing on the end nearest to the spectator, not two pewter
flagons, as I at first thought, but one glass and one pewter flagon. On the
end of this table, which is presented to the spectator, is an inscription,
which, as I have said, had hitherto escaped my notice, having been
partially concealed by the frame - a modern one, not originally intended for
this picture, and partly obscured by dirt which had accumulated in the
corner. I can now make out very distinctly the following words, with the
date, which fixes beyond a question the age of the picture:

"Hier moet men gissen
Glasen te wasser
Daer in te pissen
En soú niet passen.
1659."

I may also mention, that the floor of the chamber represented in the
picture is formed of large red and blue square tiles; and that the folio
book standing on end, with another lying horizontally on the top of it,
which I said in my former description to be standing on the end of the
table, under the window, is, I now see, standing not on the table, but on
the floor, next to the chair of the grave and studious figure who sits in
the left-hand corner of the room.

These corrections of my first description have been in a great measure the
result of a little soap and water applied with a sponge to the picture.

JAMES H. TODD, D.D.

Trin. Coll., Dublin.

[Footnote 9: With some corrections in the reading of the inscriptions.]

_Myles Coverdale_ (Vol. vi., p. 552.). - I have a print before me which is
intended to represent the exhumation of Coverdale's body. The following is
engraved beneath:

"The Remains of Myles Coverdale, Bishop of Exeter, as they appeared in
the Chancel of the Church of St. Bartholomew, near the Exchange. Buried
Feb. 1569. Exhumed 23d Sept. 1840.

Chabot, Zinco., Skinner Street."

If I am not mistaken, his remains were carried to the church of St. Magnus,
near London Bridge, and re-interred.

W. P. STORER.

Olney, Bucks.

* * * * *


Miscellaneous.

NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC.

One of the most beautifully got up cheap publications which we have seen
for a long time, is the new edition of Byron's _Poems_, just issued by Mr.
Murray. It consists of eight half-crown volumes, which may be separately
purchased, viz. Childe Harold, one volume; Tales and Poems, one volume; and
the Dramas, Miscellanies, and Don Juan, &c., severally in two volumes. Mr.
Murray has also made another important contribution to the cheap literature
of the day in the republication, in a cheap and compendious form, of the
various Journals of Sir Charles Fellows, during those visits to the East to
which we owe the acquisition of the Xanthian Marbles. The present edition
of his _Travels and Researches in Asia Minor, and more particularly in the
Province of Lycia_, as it embraces the substance of all Sir Charles's
various journals and pamphlets, and only omits the Greek and Lycian
inscriptions, and lists of plants and coins, and such plates as were not
capable of being introduced into the present volume, will, we have no
doubt, be acceptable to a very numerous class of readers, and takes its
place among the most interesting of the various popular narratives of
Eastern travel.

Most of our readers will probably remember the memorable remark of Lord
Chancellor King, that "if the ancient discipline of the Church were lost,
it might be found in all its purity in the Isle of Man." Yet
notwithstanding this high eulogium on the character of the saintly Bishop
Wilson, it is painful to find that his celebrated work, _Sacra Privata_,
has hitherto been most unjustifiably treated and mutilated, as was noticed
in our last volume, p. 414. But here we have before us, in a beautifully
printed edition of this valuable work, the good bishop _himself_, what he
thought, and {98} what he wrote, in his _Private Meditations, Devotions,
and Prayers_, now for the first time printed from his original manuscripts
preserved in the library of Sion College, London. Much praise is due to the
editor for bringing this manuscript before the public, as well as for the
careful superintendence of the press; and we sincerely hope he will
continue his labours of research in Sion College as well as in other
libraries.

There are doubtless many of our readers who echo Ben Jonson's wish that
Shakspeare had blotted many a line, referring of course to those
characteristic of the age, not of the man, which cannot be read aloud. To
all such, the announcement that Messrs. Longman have commenced the
publication in monthly volumes of a new edition of Bowdler's _Family
Shakspeare, in which nothing is added to the original text, but those words
and expressions are omitted which cannot with propriety be read in a
family_, will be welcome intelligence. The work is handsomely printed in
Five-Shilling Volumes, of which the first three are already published.

BOOKS RECEIVED. - _Memoirs of James Logan, a distinguished Scholar and
Christian Legislator, &c._, by Wilson Armistead. An interesting biography
of a friend of William Penn, and one of the most learned of the early
emigrants to the American Continent. - _Yule-Tide Stories, a Collection of
Scandinavian and North German Popular Tales and Traditions._ The name of
the editor, Mr. Benjamin Thorpe, is a sufficient guarantee for the value of
this new volume of Bohn's _Antiquarian Library_. In his _Philological
Library_, Mr. Bohn has published a new and enlarged edition of Mr. Dawson
W. Turner's _Notes on Herodotus_: while in his _Classical Library_ he has
given _The Pharsalia of Lucan literally translated into English Prose, with
Copious Notes_, by H. T. Riley, B.A.; and has enriched his _Scientific
Library_ by the publication of Dr. Chalmers's _Bridgewater Treatise on the
Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God, as manifested in the Adaption of
External Nature to the Moral and Intellectual Constitution of Man_, with
the author's last corrections, and a Biographical Preface by Dr. Cumming.

_Photographic Manipulation._ _The Wax-paper Process of Gustave Le Gray_,
translated from the French, published by Knight & Sons; and _Hennah's
Directions for obtaining both Positive and Negative Pictures upon Glass by
means of the Collodion Process, &c._, published by Delatouche & Co., are
two little pamphlets which will repay the photographer for perusal, but are
deficient in that simplicity of process which is so much to be desired if
Photography is to be made more popular.

* * * * *

BOOKS AND ODD VOLUMES

WANTED TO PURCHASE.

TOWNSEND'S PARISIAN COSTUMES. 3 Vols, 4to. 1831-1839.

THE BOOK OF ADAM.

THE TESTAMENTS OF THE TWELVE PATRIARCHS, THE SONS OF JACOB.

MASSINGER'S PLAYS, by GIFFORD. Vol. IV. 8vo. Second Edition. 1813.

SPECTATOR. Vols. V. and VII. 12mo. London, 1753.

COSTERUS (FRANÇOIS) CINQUANTE MEDITATIONS DE TOUTE L'HISTOIRE DE LA PASSION
DE NOSTRE SEIGNEUR. 8vo. Anvers, Christ. Plantin.

THE WORLD WITHOUT A SUN.

GUARDIAN. 12mo.

TWO DISCOURSES OF PURGATORY AND PRAYERS FOR THE DEAD, By WM. WAKE. 1687.

WHAT THE CHARTISTS ARE. A Letter to English Working Men, by a
Fellow-Labourer. 12mo. London, 1848.

LETTER OF CHURCH RATES, by RALPH BARNES. 8vo. London, 1837.

COLMAN'S TRANSLATION OF HORACE DE ARTE POETICA. 4to. 1783.

CASAUBON'S TREATISE ON GREEK AND ROMAN SATIRE.

BOSCAWEN'S TREATISE ON SATIRE. London, 1797.

JOHNSON'S LIVES (Walker's Classics). Vol. I.

TITMARSH'S PARIS SKETCH-BOOK. Post 8vo. Vol. I. Macrone, 1840.

FIELDING'S WORKS. Vol. XI. (being second of "Amelia.") 12mo. 1808.

HOLCROFT'S LAVATER. Vol. I. 8vo. 1789.

OTWAY. Vols. I. and II. 8vo. 1768.

EDMONDSON'S HERALDRY. Vol. II. Folio, 1780.

SERMONS AND TRACTS, by W. ADAMS, D.D.

THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE for January 1851.

BEN JONSON'S WORKS. (London, 1716. 6 Vols.) Vol. II. wanted.

RAPIN'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 8vo. Vols. I., III. and V. of the CONTINUATION
by TINDAL. 1744.

SHARPE'S PROSE WRITERS. Vol. IV. 21 Vols., 1819. Piccadilly.

INCHBALD'S BRITISH THEATRE. Vol. XXIV. 25 Vols. Longman.

MEYRICK'S ANCIENT ARMOUR, by SKELTON. Part XVI.

*** _Correspondents sending Lists of Books Wanted are requested to send
their names._

*** Letters, stating particulars and lowest price, _carriage free_, to be
sent to MR. BELL, Publisher of "NOTES AND QUERIES," 186. Fleet Street.

* * * * *

Notices to Correspondents.

BACK NUMBERS. _Parties requiring Back Numbers are requested to make
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M. W. B._'s Note to_ J. B. _has been forwarded_.

A. T. F. (Bristol.) _Our Correspondent's kind offer is declined, with
thanks._

SIGMA _is thanked: but he will see that we could not_ now _alter the size
of our volumes_.

W. C. H. D. _will find, in our_ 6th Vol, pp. 312, 313., _his Query
anticipated. The reading will be found in Knight's_ Pictorial Shakspeare.

H. E. _who asks who, what, and when_ Captain Cuttle _was? is informed that
he is a_ relation _of one of the most able writers of the day - Mr. Charles
Dickens. He was formerly in the Mercantile Marine, and a Skipper in the
service of the well-known house of_ Dombey and Son.

MISTLETOE ON OAKS. O. S. R. _is referred to our_ 4th Volume, pp. 192. 226.
396. 462., _for information upon this point_.

MR. SIMS _is thanked for his communication, which we will endeavour to make
use of at some future time_.

IOTA _is informed that the Chloride of Barium, used in about the same
proportion as common salt, will give the tint he desires. His second Query
has already been answered in our preceding Numbers. As to the mode of
altering his camera, he must tax his own ingenuity as to the best mode of
attaching to it the flexible sleeves, &c._

_We are unavoidably compelled to postpone until next week_ MR. LAWRENCE _on
the Albumen Process, and_ MR. DELAMOTTE_'s notice of a Portable Camera_.

PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. _Particulars of this newly-formed Society in our
next._

_We again repeat that we cannot undertake to recommend any particular
houses for the purchase of photographic instruments, chemicals, &c. We can
only refer our Correspondents on such subjects to our advertising columns._

OUR SIXTH VOLUME, _strongly bound in cloth, with very copious Index, is now
ready, price 10s. 6d. Arrangements are making for the publication of
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"NOTES AND QUERIES" _is published at noon on Friday, so that the Country
Booksellers may receive Copies in that night's parcel, and deliver them to
their Subscribers on the Saturday_. {99}

* * * * *


BENNETT'S MODEL WATCH, as shown at the GREAT EXHIBITION No. 1. Class X., in
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Founded A.D. 1842.

_Directors._
H. Edgeworth Bicknell, Esq.
William Cabell, Esq.
T. Somers Cocks, Jun. Esq. M.P.
G. Henry Drew, Esq.
William Evans, Esq.
William Freeman, Esq.
F. Fuller, Esq.
J. Henry Goodhart, Esq.
T. Grissell, Esq.
James Hunt, Esq.
J. Arscott Lethbridge, Esq.
E. Lucas, Esq.
James Lys Seager, Esq.
J. Basley White, Esq.
Joseph Carter Wood, Esq.

_Trustees._
W. Whateley, Esq., Q.C.;
L. C. Humfrey, Esq., Q.C.;
George Drew, Esq.

_Consulting Counsel._ - Sir Wm. P. Wood, M.P.

_Physician._ - William Rich. Basham, M.D.

_Bankers._ - Messrs. Cocks, Biddulph, and Co., Charing Cross.

VALUABLE PRIVILEGE.

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* * * * *


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* * * * *


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* * * * *


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* * * * *


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