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NOTES AND QUERIES, FEB 11, 1854 ***




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{117}

NOTES AND QUERIES:

A MEDIUM OF INTER-COMMUNICATION FOR LITERARY MEN, ARTISTS, ANTIQUARIES,
GENEALOGISTS, ETC.

"When found, make a note of." - CAPTAIN CUTTLE.

* * * * *


No. 224.]
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11. 1854
[Price Fourpence. Stamped Edition 5d.

* * * * *


CONTENTS.

NOTES: - Page

Eliminate, by C. Mansfield Ingleby 119

Cranmer's Bible 119

Sovereigns Dining and Supping in Public 120

Parallel Ideas from Poets, by Norris Deck 121

The great Alphabetic Psalm, and the Songs of Degrees,
by T. J. Buckton 121

MINOR NOTES: - Inscription on a Grave-stone in Whittlebury
Churchyard, Northamptonshire - Epitaph on Sir Henry
St. George - Newton and Milton - Eternal Life - Inscriptions
in Books - Churchill's Grave 122

QUERIES: -

Coronation Stone 123

Old Mereworth Castle, Kent 124

MINOR QUERIES: - "I could not love thee, dear, so much" -
Leicester as Ranger of Snowden - Crabb of Telsford -
Tolling the Bell while the Congregation is leaving
Church - O'Brien of Thosmond - Order of St. David of
Wales - Warple-way - Purlet - Liveries, Red and Scarlet -
Dr. Bragge - Chauncy, or Chancy - Plaster Casts -
[Greek: Sikera] - Dogs in Monumental Brasses 125

MINOR QUERIES WITH ANSWERS: - Marquis of Granby -
"Memorials of English Affairs," &c. - Standing when the
Lord's Prayer is read - Hypocrisy, &c. 127

REPLIES: -

"Consilium Novem Delectorum Cardinalium," &c.,
by B. B. Woodward 127

John Bunyan, by George Offor 129

The Asteroids, &c., by J. Wm. Harris 129

Caps at Cambridge, by C. H. Cooper 130

Russia, Turkey, and the Black Sea, by John Macray 132

High Dutch and Low Dutch, by Professor Goedes de Grüter 132

PHOTOGRAPHIC CORRESPONDENCE: - The Calotype on the Sea-shore 134

REPLIES TO MINOR QUERIES: - Ned o' the Todding - Hour-Glasses
and Inscriptions on Old Pulpits - Table-turning - "Firm was
their faith" - The Wilbraham Cheshire MS. - Mousehunt -
Begging the Question - Termination "-by" - German Tree -
Celtic Etymology - Recent Curiosities of Literature -
D. O. M. - Dr. John Taylor - Lines attributed to Hudibras
- "Corporations have no Souls," &c. - Lord Mayor of London
a Privy Councillor - Booty's Case - "Sat cito, si sat
bene" - Celtic and Latin Languages - Brydone the Tourist's
Birth-place 135

MISCELLANEOUS: -

Notes on Books, &c. 138

Books and Odd Volumes wanted 138

Notices to Correspondents 139

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{118}

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{119}

_LONDON, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1854._

Notes.

ELIMINATE.

(Vol. v., p. 317.)

"N. & Q." has from time to time done much good service by holding up to
reprobation modern and growing corruptions of the English language. I trust
that its columns may be open to one more attempt to rescue from abuse the
word which stands at the head of this article.

Its signification, whether sought from Latin usage and etymology, or from
the works of English mathematicians, is "to turn out of doors," "to oust,"
or, as we say in the midland counties, "to get shut of." In French it may
be rendered as well by _se défaire_ as by _éliminer_. Within the last seven
or eight years, however, this valuable spoil of dead Latinity has been
strangely perverted, and, through the ignorance or carelessness of writers,
it has bidden fair to take to itself two significations utterly distinct
from its derivation, viz. to "elicit," and to "evaluate." The former
signification, if less vicious, is more commonly used than the latter. I
append examples of both from three of the most elegant writers of the day.
In the third extract the word under consideration is used in the latter
sense; in the other extracts it carries the former.

_Lectures on the Philosophical Tendencies of the Age_, by J. D. Morrell,
London, 1848, p. 41.:

"Had the men of ancient times, when they peopled the universe with
deities, a deeper perception of the religious element in the mind, than
had Newton, when having _eliminated_ the great law of the natural
creation, his enraptured soul burst forth into the infinite and
adored?"

I take one more illustration (among many others) from pp. 145, 146. of this
work:

"It would not be strictly speaking correct to call them philosophical
methods, because a philosophical method only exists when any tendency
works itself clear, and gives rise to a formal, connected, and logical
system of rules, by which we are to proceed in the _elimination_ of
truth."

_The Eclipse of Faith_, by Professor Rogers, London, 1852, p. 392.:

"They are now at college, and have imbibed in different degrees that
curious theory which professedly recognises Christianity (as consigned
to the New Testament) as a truly _divine_ revelation, yet asserts that
it is intermingled with a large amount of error and absurdity, and
tells each man to _eliminate_ the divine 'element' for himself.
According to this theory, the problem of eliciting revealed truth may
be said to be indeterminate, the value of the unknown varies through
all degrees of magnitude; it is equal to any thing, equal to every
thing, equal to nothing, equal to infinity."

_Theological Essays_, by F. D. Maurice, Cambridge, 1853, p. 89.:

"Let us look, therefore, courageously at the popular dogma, that there
are certain great ideas floating in the vast ocean of traditions which
the old world exhibits to us, that the gospel appropriated some of
these, and that we are to detect them and _eliminate_ them from its own
traditions."

But for the fact that such writers have given the weight of their names to
so unparalleled a blunder, it would seem almost childish to occupy the
columns of a literary periodical with exposing it. It is, however, somewhat
singular that it should be principally men of _classical_ attainments who
perpetrate it. In my under-graduate days at Cambridge, the proneness of
"classical men" to commit the blunder in question was proverbial.

In conclusion, then, let it be remembered that the word "eliminate"
obtained general currency from the circumstance of its being originally
admitted into mathematical works. In such works _elimination_ signifies the
process of causing a function to disappear from an equation, the solution
of which would be embarrassed by its presence there. In other writings the
word "elimination" has but one correct signification, viz. "the extrusion
of that which is superfluous or irrelevant." As an example of this
legitimate use of the word, I will quote from Sir William Hamilton's
accurate, witty, and learned article on "Logic," published in the
_Edinburgh Review_, April, 1833:

"The preparatory step of the discussion was, therefore, an
_elimination_ of these less precise and appropriate significations,
which, as they could at best only afford a remote genus and difference,
were wholly incompetent for the purpose of a definition."

C. MANSFIELD INGLEBY.

Birmingham.

* * * * *

CRANMER'S BIBLE.

Queries which I have heard at various times lead me to think that a Note on
this interesting volume may be acceptable to many readers who possess or
have access to it; and especially to those whose copies may be (as too many
are) imperfect at the beginning and end. Under this impression I send you
an extract from the late Mr. Lea Wilson's catalogue of his unrivalled
Collection of English Bibles. As very few copies of this curious and
beautiful work were printed, and not one, I believe, has been sold, it is
probable that few of your readers are aware of the criteria which that
gentleman's ingenuity and industry have furnished for distinguishing
between the {120} various editions which are known under the title of _The
Great Bible_, or _Cranmer's Bible_. He begins his description of the
edition of April, 1539, thus:

"As this volume is commonly called the First Edition of Cranmer's or
the Great Bible, I class it with the Six following; although in fact
the Archbishop had nothing whatever to do with either the translation
or publication. It was put forth entirely by Thomas Lord Cromwell, vide
Herbert's _Ames_, p. 1550. vol. iii., who employed Coverdale to revise
the existing translations. The first wherein Cranmer took any part is
the large folio of April 1540, the text of which differs from this
edition materially. The pages of this volume and of the four next
following begin and end alike; and the general appearance of the whole
five is so very similar that at first sight, one may be mistaken for
another by those ignorant of the fact that they are all separate and
distinct impressions: the whole of the titles, of which there are five
in each Book, and every leaf of kalendar, prologue, text, and tables
being entirely recomposed, and varying throughout in orthography, &c.
The desire to make perfect copies out of several imperfect, has also
caused extreme confusion, by uniting portions of different editions
without due regard to their identity. These remarks apply equally to
the editions of Nov. 1540, and Nov. 1541, of which, in like manner,
each page begins and ends with the same words. Although the distinctive
marks are very numerous, yet being chiefly typographical ornaments or
arrangement, it is impossible to give here sufficient guides to ensure
the integrity of each volume." - Page 12.

On the next page but one is added:

"The following lines of the forty-first chapter of Job differ in
composition in all the seven volumes, and for the purpose of
distinguishing the edition I have given them to each."

_No. 1. April, 1539._

No m[=a] is so cruell, that is able to stere him up. *Who is able to
stande before me? Or ++who hath geu[=e] me anything afore hande, that I
maye rewarde him agayne? All thynges un-

_No. 2. April, 1540._

No man is so cruell, y^t is able to stere h[=i] up. *Who is able to
st[=a]de before me? Or ++who hath geuen me any thyng afore h[=a]de, y^e
I maye rewarde him agayne? All thynges

_No. 3. July, 1540._

No man is so cruell, y^t is able to stere hym up. *who is able to
stande before me? Or ++who hath geuen me any thynge aforehande, that I


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