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OUR LITTLE ONES, JULY 1885 ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Emmy and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net








[Illustration]


JULY

Vol. V. No. 9.

1885.

OUR LITTLE ONES

AND

THE

NURSERY

THE RUSSELL PUBLISHING CO.

36 BROMFIELD ST BOSTON

THOS. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON.

Copyright, 1885, by RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.] [Entered at the P. O.
at Boston as second-class matter.




CONTENTS.


PAGE

A PICTURE JACK BARLOW 259
(Illustrated by R. W. Vonnoh.)

NAUGHTY NASNA LAURA E. RICHARDS 260
(Illustrated by Culmer Barnes.)

"CHOW-CHOW" BESSIE PEDDER 263
(Illustrated by Arthur Douglas.)

POLLY'S BABY M. D. BRINE 266
(Illustrated by Jessie C. Shepherd.)

HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK! PENN SHIRLEY 268
(Illustrated by Jessie C. Shepherd.)

A MEADOW SONG ELIZABETH A. DAVIS 270
(Illustrated by E. P. Hayden.)

OUR MOCKING BIRD VAN BUREN 273
(Illustrated by A. S. Cox.)

TROTTIE'S DOINGS JENNIE JUDSON 274
(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.)

"SEVENTEEN, EIGHTEEN, MAIDS IN WAITING" MARGARET JOHNSON 276
(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.)

THE PIGS' CHOWDER PARTY FRANCES P. CHAPLIN 278
(Illustrated by A. Buhler.)

PUSSY'S ADOPTED CHILDREN S. D. L. H. 280
(Illustrated by Ellen Oakford.)

SEVEN TIMES ONE DAY NOBLE 282
(Illustrated by Miss C. A. Northam.)

WHAT KATY DID AUNT FANNY 284
(Illustrated by Miss M. Humphrey.)

PULL THE WEEDS M. E. MCKEE 286
(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.)

THISTLEDOWN JENNIE JOY 288
(Music by T. Crampton.)


The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. GEORGE T. ANDREW.




OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY,

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RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS.


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[Illustration]

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name sent shall be that of a new subscriber, not the
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[Illustration]

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[Illustration]

[Illustration]




OUR LITTLE ONES

July,

1885

Vol. V. Copyright, 1885, by Russell Publishing Company. No. 9.




A PICTURE.


Dainty little Marguerite,
Tripping down the stair,
With the dancing sunlight
In her golden hair,

Through the open doorway,
In the sunny brightness,
Where the morning-glories
Nod in airy lightness.

Mamma, coming downwards,
Sees her darling stand,
Snowy ruffled apron
Held in either hand,

Making stately courtesy
With a childlike grace,
And a reverent brightness
On her upturned face.

"What art doing, baby?"
Called the mother's voice,
While the pretty picture
Made her heart rejoice.

Morning-glories kissed the curls
The open brow adorning,
As the little maid replied,
"I'm wishing God good morning."

JACK BARLOW.




NAUGHTY NASNA.


[Illustration]

Nasna was a coati-mondi, a cousin of the raccoon family. She was about
the size of a cat, with thick, coarse fur, brown on the back and sides,
and shading from yellow to orange underneath. She had a head and four
legs, and a fat body; but the two most important parts of her, in her
own opinion at least, were her nose and her tail. The tail was certainly
very handsome, long, and bushy, with black and yellow rings round it.
The nose was long, too, - long and sharp, and always poking, poking
itself everywhere. There never was such an inquisitive nose. Now it was
lifting the lid of a pot on the kitchen fire (for Nasna was tame, and a
great pet of her master's), and scalding itself with the steam; now it
was sniffing at a bottle of strong ammonia, without seeming to be
troubled in the least by the smell; now it was in her master's pocket,
trying to find out what it was that went "Tick! tick!"

[Illustration]

But what do you think the nose did one day? oh! _what_ do you think it
did? You never could guess, and so I must tell you.

[Illustration]

The old cat had been asleep beside the kitchen fire. She had had a
long, long nap, - the sleepy old cat, - and when she woke up she felt that
she needed a long, long stretch before she was quite herself again. Now,
the way in which the old cat stretched herself was this: she put her
four feet close together, and humped her back just as high as she could
possibly hump it; then she stretched herself, and opened her mouth to
its fullest extent, and said, "Mu-aw-yu-aouw!"

[Illustration]

This was a singular performance. Nasna had never seen it before, and
when she saw the red mouth open, wide, wider, widest, she immediately
said to herself, "Dear me! how very odd! I wonder what there is inside
that red cavern? I'm going to look!" and the next moment the long,
velvety nose was poked right into the old cat's mouth, and almost down
her throat.

Did the old cat shut her mouth? She did, indeed, my child; and who can
blame her for doing so? But there was a sound of woe in the air, and a
squealing as of a coati in despair, and the next moment Nasna was
crouching in the farthest corner of the room, holding her wounded nose
in both hands, and sneezing violently.

[Illustration]

But do not think that this was a lesson to Nasna; nothing of the kind!
The very next morning she managed to find her way into the dining-room
when the master and mistress were at breakfast. She climbed up at once
into the mistress' lap, and poked her nose at the shining coffee-pot.
Ah! it was hot. Pop went the nose into the cup of coffee that was
steaming beside the mistress' plate. Oh! that was hotter.

"I won't stay here any longer, to be treated so!" cried Nasna; and down
she jumped to the floor.

Buzz! buzz! what is that by the window? Something small, flying about,
with a black and yellow jacket on. See, now it is crawling on the floor,
and Nasna can catch it. Nasna does catch it, putting her soft paw on it.
Mr. Wasp extends his sting, as the utmost he has to offer. Nasna squeaks
wofully, but does not understand yet, so puts her nose down instead of
her paw. This time there is no doubt about the matter, and she retires
in great anguish to the kitchen.

[Illustration]

One day as she was playing about, tettered by a string to a chair, her
master took an egg and placed it on the floor, at a very provoking
distance. Nasna could just touch it with one paw, but could not get hold
of it. She tried with fore paws, she tried with hind paws; but all in
vain: she only succeeded in rolling the egg a little further off. What
was to be done? She sat down and looked at the egg long and
thoughtfully. At last she put her head on one side and winked: she had
an idea. She turned her back on the coveted treasure, and backed towards
it as far as she could. Then she grasped her tail with one paw,
stiffened it and curved the tip almost into a hook, and, touching the
egg with this hook, slowly and cautiously rolled it round in front of
her, till she could reach it with her fore paw. Then, in triumph and
much pride, she sat up on her haunches, cracked the egg, and sucked it,
without spilling a drop. Clever Nasna! I think she deserved a good
breakfast, don't you?

LAURA E. RICHARDS.




"CHOW-CHOW."


"Chow-Chow" was not a pickle, but a chicken, and a real funny one, too.

I made friends with him when he was no bigger than a robin. He was an
only child; of course his mother had enough to do to pet and fuss over
him. But he would leave her any time when we called "Chow-Chow." We gave
him this funny name because he was a great talker. All he said was
"C-h-o-w-C-h-o-w," and then "_Chow-Chow-Chow-Chow_" as fast as he could
talk.

[Illustration]

His mother was a beautiful buff Shanghai, but he was a long-legged
Brahma, dressed in a speckled black and gray suit. As the days got
chilly, in the fall, it seemed as if he suffered dreadfully from cold
feet. He was always cuddling down in the warm feathers on his mother's
back, even when he was a pretty big fellow.

One day I said, "Come, 'Chow-Chow,' don't trouble your mother. I'll give
you a good warming by the kitchen fire." I carried him into the kitchen,
opened the oven door, and gave his cold feet a good toasting. Oh, how he
enjoyed it! He opened and shut his claws as he lay on my lap, and
_chow-chowed_, and pecked at the buttons of my dress.

The next day it was pretty cold, and the first thing I heard when I
went into the kitchen was a tapping at the window-pane. There was
"Chow-Chow" on the window-sill, pecking at the glass, and holding up one


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Online LibraryVariousOur Little Ones and The Nursery, Vol. V, No. 9, July 1885 → online text (page 1 of 3)