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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, JUNE, 1880 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









VOL. XXXIV. NO. 6.

THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

“To the Poor the Gospel is Preached.”

* * * * *

JUNE, 1880.




_CONTENTS_:


PARAGRAPHS 161
SIX PREACHERS, ALL CALLED—NEW INDUSTRIES AND SIGNIFICANT
FEATURES OF NEW LIFE IN THE SOUTH 166
THE NEGRO, ON THE STATUS AND EXODUS OF THE NEGRO 167
CONDITIONS OF INDIAN CIVILIZATION—AFRICAN NOTES 169
ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 170


THE FREEDMEN.

A TOUR OF THE CONFERENCES 172
NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE 175
SOUTH-WESTERN CONGREGATIONAL ASSOCIATION 176
GEORGIA, MACON—Revival 177
ALABAMA—Notes from Selma 179


AFRICA.

LETTER FROM PROF. T. N. CHASE 180


THE CHINESE.

POLITICS AND THE MISSION, ETC. 182


CHILDREN’S PAGE.

LETTERS FROM INDIAN BOYS 184


RECEIPTS 185


CONSTITUTION 189


AIM, STATISTICS, WANTS 190

* * * * *

NEW YORK.

Published by the American Missionary Association,

ROOMS, 56 READE STREET.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance.

Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.




American Missionary Association,

56 READE STREET, N. Y.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT.

HON. E. S. TOBEY, Boston.


VICE-PRESIDENTS.

Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio.
Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis.
Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass.
ANDREW LESTER, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. D., Me.
Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct.
WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I.
Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass.
Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I.
Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I.
Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. J.
Rev. EDWARD BEECHER, D. D., N. Y.
Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., Ill.
Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C.
Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La.
HORACE HALLOCK, Esq., Mich.
Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H.
Rev. EDWARD HAWES, D. D., Ct.
DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio.
Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt.
SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn.
Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y.
Gen. O. O. HOWARD, Oregon.
Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa.
Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill.
EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H.
DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J.
Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct.
Rev. W. L. GAGE, D. D., Ct.
A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio.
Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Minn.
Rev. J. W. STRONG, D. D., Minn.
Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California.
Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon.
Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C.
Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis.
S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass.
PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass.
Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass.
Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa.
Rev. WM. T. CARR, Ct.
Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct.
Sir PETER COATS, Scotland.
Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng.
WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N. Y.
J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass.
E. A. GRAVES, Esq., N. J.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ill.
DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct.
A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass.
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y.
FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt.
JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I.
Rev. E. P. GOODWIN, D. D., Ill.
Rev. C. L. GOODELL, D. D., Mo.
J. W. SCOVILLE, Esq., Ill.
E. W. BLATCHFORD, Esq., Ill.
C. D. TALCOTT, Esq., Ct.
Rev. JOHN K. MCLEAN, D. D., Cal.
Rev. RICHARD CORDLEY, D. D., Kansas.


CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., _56 Reade Street, N. Y._


DISTRICT SECRETARIES.

REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, _Boston_.
REV. G. D. PIKE, _New York_.
REV. JAS. POWELL, _Chicago_.

H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., _Treasurer, N. Y._
REV. M. E. STRIEBY, _Recording Secretary_.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

ALONZO S. BALL,
A. S. BARNES,
GEO. M. BOYNTON,
WM. B. BROWN,
C. T. CHRISTENSEN,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER,
S. B. HALLIDAY,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
CHARLES A. HULL,
EDGAR KETCHUM,
CHAS. L. MEAD,
WM. T. PRATT,
J. A. SHOUDY,
JOHN H. WASHBURN,
G. B. WILLCOX.


COMMUNICATIONS

relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields to
the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the “American
Missionary,” to Rev. C. C. PAINTER, at the New York Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New
York, or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXIV. JUNE, 1880. NO. 6

* * * * *




American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


As we go to press, we are happy to announce the safe arrival of
Prof. Thomas N. Chase, from our Mendi Mission.

* * * * *

_That 20 per cent._ increase in our appropriations, voted at
Chicago, and voted also by the Executive Committee, has not as
yet been furnished by our friends. We are compelled to urge it
upon their attention that we are in danger of falling behind the
appropriation, to our grief and the detriment of the work, unless
they come gallantly to the rescue.

* * * * *

_Who Will do It?_—One of our missionaries in North Carolina
suggests, and we cordially second the suggestion, that some of our
friends send us the means for distributing 1,000 copies of the
MISSIONARY to as many prominent men, clergymen and others, through
the South. We are confident that a like sum of money could not be
expended in a way to tell more favorably upon our work after the
means have been supplied to carry it on. Will not some generous
friend of the South send us the money?

* * * * *

_Tougaloo’s Plea._—Through its workers, this Institution puts in a
most pathetic plea to the Executive Committee for an appropriation
for a new building. How they inquire, can 120 persons be seated in
a dining-room large enough for only 80? Or how can fifty girls be
put into 16 small dormitories? The Executive Committee gives it up,
and sends it along as too much of a 15-puzzle. The plea melts the
hearts of us who have no money, so we make it to those who have,
hoping some one will help to a solution of this problem.

Fully as difficult is that propounded by President Ware, of
Atlanta: Sixty-two girls in rooms fitted for forty, and prospects
that the number cannot be kept down to that. It could be easily
increased to one hundred next year. The $10,000, given from the
Graves estate for a building, must be supplemented by $5,000 to
make it adequate to pressing need. Who gives the answer to _this_?

* * * * *

_The Christian Recorder_, Philadelphia, (organ of the A. M. E.
Church,) in noticing the “Fool’s Errand,” refers to the fact that
the Fool found himself limited to the society of the teachers of
the colored schools and a few Northern families, and asks: “Why
so? Were there no colored people there? The South ostracised him
because of his _opinions_, while _he_ ostracised the negroes
because of their _color_.” Of the two, the _Recorder_ believes the
South the more rational and consistent.

* * * * *

_Laws of Heredity._—One of the—not fathers, but great-grandfathers,
in Israel, writes a pleasant note from Jewett City, Conn., to
say how much pleasure he takes in reading the “Receipt pages”
of the MISSIONARY, finding them the most interesting of the
whole. He notes as an especially pleasant feature, the increasing
number of “friends,” who send, as in the last number, from $2.00
to $1,747.50. He mentions with great satisfaction that he has
learned to look regularly in the May number for a contribution
from the grandson of an old French Huguenot, who fifty years ago
hobbled regularly to the parsonage on the morning after missionary
meetings, and asked him (the writer) to get 25 cents out of his
purse for the work, which always left the purse empty. The grandson
now sends $20. Of him, he says, with Leigh Hunt, “May his tribe
increase.” We shall be glad if investigation on the part of some
missionary Darwin shall establish the fact that such tendencies are
transmitted with accumulating force from father to son.

* * * * *

In Southwest Texas, at a Freedman’s country home, our
Superintendent found a Bible which had this inscription, printed
upon a fly-leaf at the front:

“One of 10,000 Bibles presented to the Freedmen of America by
the Divinity Students’ Missionary Society, connected with the
United Presbyterian Church of Scotland. Printed at the University
Press, Oxford, for the National Bible Society of Scotland.” So
does religious beneficence percolate the most distant regions.
Our colored fellow-citizens have been made the recipients of an
immense amount of material and spiritual sympathy on the part of
British Christians. These Divinity Students will be glad to know
that this Bible, sent by their Society some ten years ago, is used
for morning and evening family worship in an interesting household,
which possesses its own farm, and which furnished hospitality to
our representative.

* * * * *

A dozen years ago, one of our lady teachers at a Southern
capital had a shower of stones driven through the window of her
school-room. At another time, some “fellows of the baser sort”
brought in some drunken Mexicans to annoy the school. A guard of
soldiers was placed at the school-house, and she was escorted to
and from the school by the same. Now she has so many friends among
the Southern white people that she says she doesn’t like to hear
them spoken against. She has not time to reciprocate their social
attentions. The school has proven a great success. She has her
fifty teachers out at work and she is as enthusiastic as ever.

* * * * *

_Rev. Geo. E. Hill_, of Marion, Ala., mentions a few facts in a
private note which doubtless he deemed too commonplace for formal
communication to the MISSIONARY, yet significant and hopeful. Not
every pastor, even in favored New England, is so fortunate in his
young people.

On a recent Sabbath, one of his boys, who is to graduate this
summer from Talladega, preached for him, and proved himself a good
speaker, possessed of a clear, logical mind, with the promise of
being a useful man. On the next day, he and another member of his
church, also a Talladega student, spoke at the meeting of the Young
Men’s Christian Association extemporaneously, but with great beauty
and force. His missionary meetings are conducted in a way that
might be profitably followed by such of our churches as have like
helpers. The subject of the last one was “Africa,” illustrated by
a large map. Miss M., a graduate of Fisk University, read a paper
on the Mendi Mission, “which would have done honor to any of our
Northern churches.” She is possessed of a true missionary spirit
and Bro. Hill hopes she will find her way into the mission field,
notwithstanding a misfortune which has partially disabled her.

He has also a Young People’s Club for intellectual culture. At
its last meeting, the programme included: A sketch of Gen. Grant;
a paper on Mormonism; a sketch of Eli Whitney; a history of
Umbrellas; a reading, recitations, etc.

He seems to have a church of “Holy Endeavor,” with the athletics
and pastimes left out.

* * * * *

_A Confederate and a Man._—He was a colonel. He is the editor of a
leading journal of the South. Some years since, an educated mulatto
woman from Ohio went South to secure a position as a teacher. She
was thrust into the smoking-car to endure the commingled filth and
ribaldry of the place.

After securing her position, it was necessary to return home
before entering upon her duties. She sought the intervention of
the colonel. He went to the local superintendent, who sent orders
along the line over three roads which gave her admission to the
ladies’ car, both on her way home and on her return. She proved a
splendid teacher and noble woman, and the colonel is proud to have
championed her cause, when to do so was unpopular.

The same colonel is now wielding a great influence in the South in
favor of negro education, and recently, both in his paper and at a
public meeting, has expressed thanks to the A. M. A. for work it
has been doing in the South.

The influences multiply and reach out in every direction, which are
destined soon to bring a total and wholesome change of sentiment,
North and South.

* * * * *

We have received the proceedings of the Colored Men’s State
Immigration Convention, held in Dallas, Texas, the latter part
of February. An association was formed whose object is to locate
colonies of colored people on Government lands in that State. Mr.
S. H. Smothers, editor of the _Baptist Journal_, of Dallas, said
in his address, as explanatory of the Exodus movement among his
people, what seems to have escaped the attention of the Senate
Exodus Committee, that the negro may act from the same motives that
influence white men. His address is full of good common sense, as
the following may show:

“Only a few weeks ago, in a conversation with a colored immigrant
from Georgia, I asked him why he left that State and came to Texas.
He replied that a great many of his white neighbors were moving to
Texas, and he thought that whatever was good for them would be good
for him.

“Much has been said in regard to the wrongs and oppressions of
which our people complain. While, doubtless, there is some ground
for their complaint, their hardships, in my opinion, are more
the result of their illiterate condition than all things else.
If a class of white laborers were as illiterate as our people,
they would be equally oppressed as are the Irish tenants to-day.
Capitalists look out for their own interest, and will, if they can,
oppress one man, be his color what it may, as soon as another. We
should remember that knowledge is power and ignorance is weakness.
The protection which we most need is the power which education and
property give. For my own part, all I ask of any man is an equal
chance, and then if he can outstrip me in the race of life, let him
do it.”

* * * * *

_Lovedale Missionary Institute_, South Africa, is said to be the
busiest industrial college in the world. During the session which
closed with 1879, there were in all 393 pupils of both sexes, many
of them boarders, who paid in fees £1,006, beside £510 still due.
Livingstonia and Blantyre sent 6 pupils; 19 came from Natal; 11
from the country of the Barolongs. The carpenter had 30 apprentices
and journeymen under him; the wagon-maker 8; the blacksmith 5; the
printer 4; the bookbinder 2. On the farm were raised 1,054 bags of
corn, beans, potatoes and wheat.

Twenty-one students, of whom eleven were Kaffir
certificated-schoolmasters, were under theological instruction. Dr.
Stewart thinks the home churches will hardly continue the present
number of missionaries beyond the lifetime of those now in the
field, and that the work will be done by a native ministry.

* * * * *

A “Livingstonia Central African Company,” for promoting legitimate
traffic among the natives, has been organized by a society of
gentlemen interested in the civilization of the “Dark Continent”
and in the development of its resources. Direct communication is
to be opened with Central Africa, and a road has already been
constructed a distance of sixty miles around the cataracts of the
Shiré, which, connecting with a line of steamers, will constitute
a line of 800 miles from the coast. Two Christian gentlemen of
Edinburgh, Messrs. John and Frederick Moir, are at the head of
the company. It is to be no less a missionary than a commercial
enterprise, and there is every reason for believing that in both
respects it will prove a success. The natives are becoming fully
awake to the advantages of the extensive and solid business
facilities possessed by the company, whose future will be watched
with great interest.

* * * * *

The _West African Reporter_, of Sierra Leone, in announcing changes
in the officers and probably in the location of the Liberia
College, (Dr. Blyden having been appointed President; and the
trustees, leave being given by the legislature, having voted to
co-operate with the American Board in a plan to remove the college
further into the interior,) expresses itself strongly in regard to
the injury done to natives who have been sent to Europe to receive
their education. It sums the result thus:

“We find our children, as a result of their foreign culture—we do
not say _in spite_ of their foreign culture—but as a _result_ of
their foreign culture—aimless and purposeless for the race—crammed
with European formulas of thought and expression, so as to astonish
their bewildered relatives. Their friends wonder at the words of
their mouth. But they wonder at other things besides their words.
They are the Polyphemus of civilization—huge, but sightless—_cui
lumen ademptum_.”

To some extent the same holds true of negroes from the South,
educated in the North for work in their old homes.

* * * * *

_Onondaga and Oneida Indians._—There are in the State of New York
eight Indian reservations, aggregating 86,336 acres of land, a
little less than 18 acres to each of the 5,093 Indians who occupy
them. These lands are held by tribal and not individual titles. A
few of these Indians have become thrifty farmers, but the most of
them are idle and poor; probably one-half are still pagans. A bill
has been introduced into the Legislature to abolish, with consent
of the Indians, the treaty of 1788, and distribute these lands
in severalty to these people. This would end the fatal communal
system, which has proved in this, as it must in all cases, so
deadly to all prosperity. Each Indian would thus become, under the
laws of the State, a land-owner, and amenable to the laws on the
same footing as other citizens.

Under the present tribal system, the father has nothing but his
tomahawk and scalping knife to leave to his children, and transmits
only a disposition to use them. Give him the right to acquire a
title to something else, and he will doubtless acquire and bequeath
it.

* * * * *

There is a poor blind Samson in this land,
Shorn of his strength and hound in bands of steel,
Who may in some grim revel, raise his hand,
And shake the pillars of this commonweal,
Till the vast temple of our liberties
A shapeless mass of wreck and rubbish lies.

That same “blind Samson” is in the land to-day. It is the Negro,
uneducated, immoral, with a ballot in his hand. It is the white
man, uneducated, immoral, with a ballot in his hand. For it makes
no difference. The harm lies back of the color. The consequences of
ignorant suffrage, by whomsoever exercised, can be only detrimental
to the peace and welfare of the State. Free institutions can be
built up only on the basis of intelligence and integrity. Without
intelligence and integrity, the best cannot long survive. If there
be large numbers on whom this right has been conferred, but who are
densely ignorant, especially if these large numbers are grouped in
a single section, like these millions of negroes and poor whites
in the South, it is an official notice served on the nation that
no time is to be lost in imparting the mental and moral training
requisite for the right discharge of these sacred functions of
voting. Men are not left to settle this question of helping with
schools and churches, merely on the ground of humanity or Christian
duty. Their interest is challenged, and their very selfishness is
under contribution. We do not put matches in children’s hands, and
then leave them to play about hay-mows. If we give them matches
we train them in the use of them. With an instrument in his
hands so potent as the ballot, and with the possibility of using
the leverage of it in contingencies easy to be foreseen for the
overturning of the nation, it takes but half an eye to see that
the man who wields it ought to have an instructed mind and an
instructed conscience, and the State is not secure until he does.

—[DR. NOBLE _in Advance_.


SIX PREACHERS, ALL OF THEM CALLED.

[The following letter reveals the condition of _one_ out of many
neighborhoods scattered all over the South, densely populated
with negroes, neglected by the whites, excepting as the agent or
overseer of the plantation looks after the owner’s interests as
connected with the labor of the people. No schools, no churches,
excepting such as are ministered to by preachers as ignorant and,
in many cases, as licentious as the people themselves. Just think
of it! The visit of this Sunday-school agent the first visit of
a white Christian to the hundred families; their religious and
other culture such as those six preachers could give! And this
not in Central Africa, but in the very heart of the southwest
portion of our own land! These people citizens of our republic, and
voters!—ED. MISS.]

A missionary of the American Sunday-School Union in the Southwest
writes:

“I recently organized a Sunday-school for the colored people at
Homan Station, on the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern R. R.,
in Miller County, between Texarkana and the Red River, where is
a large cotton plantation, and two others are near, having in
all more than one hundred families. Among them is one Baptist
church, and six preachers, every one ‘called!’ Only two of them
can read, and the pastor or ‘head-preacher’ is blind; and so are
all, in spiritual things, preachers and people. After delivering
an address, I found that only seven in the audience could read.
In all, fifty adults and children joined the Sunday-school and
promised to learn to read. I furnished them with primers, Bibles,
Testaments, etc., which seemed to please the plantation agent or
overseer as well as the people.

“After the school was organized, the blind preacher gave a sermon
from Rev. xxii. 1, 2, another preacher doing the reading. I shall
not attempt to characterize the sermon, singing and responses. When
will white Christians, who know the way of life, surrender their
prejudices and teach these poor, benighted people the truths of the
Gospel? My visit was the first made by a white Christian worker to
this place, and will be remembered.”

* * * * *


NEW INDUSTRIES AND SIGNIFICANT FEATURES OF A NEW LIFE IN THE SOUTH.

It is a good indication of the movement of the South to manufacture


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 34, No. 06, June, 1880 → online text (page 1 of 6)