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The American Missionary — Volume 34, No. 10, October, 1880 online

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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, OCTOBER 1880 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









VOL. XXXIV. NO. 10.

THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

“To the Poor the Gospel is Preached.”

* * * * *

OCTOBER, 1880.




_CONTENTS_:


EDITORIAL.

OUR ANNUAL MEETING—PARAGRAPHS 289
PARAGRAPHS 290
JUBILEE SINGERS 291
ATLANTA’S COLORED PEOPLE—COMMON SENSE FOR COLORED MEN 292
OUR SCHOOLS AND THE COMMON SCHOOL SYSTEM 293
A NEW SOUTH, NOT A NEW ENGLAND IN THE SOUTH 294
MTESA AND THE RELIGION OF HIS ANCESTORS 296
BEGGING LETTER 297
AFRICAN NOTES 299
ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 300


THE FREEDMEN.

COLORED CADETSHIP 302
NORTH CAROLINA, MCLEANSVILLE—Revival Interest 302
SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENWOOD 303
GEORGIA—Midway Anniversary 304
GEORGIA—Atlanta University and Temperance 305
ALABAMA—Shelby Ironworks 305
ALABAMA—FLORENCE—Outside Work 306
MISSISSIPPI—Tougaloo University 307


THE INDIANS.

S’KOKOMISH AGENCY: Rev. Myron Eells 308
SISSETON AGENCY: Chas. Crissey 309


THE CHINESE.

SERMON BY JEE GAM 310


CHILDREN’S PAGE.

CHINESE AND CHINESE CUSTOMS 312


RECEIPTS 313


CONSTITUTION 317


AIM, STATISTICS, WANTS 318


* * * * *


NEW YORK:

Published by the American Missionary Association,

ROOMS, 56 READE STREET.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance.

Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.

* * * * *




AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION

56 READE STREET, N. Y.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT.

HON. E. S. TOBEY, Boston.


VICE-PRESIDENTS.

Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio.
Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis.
Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass.
ANDREW LESTER, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. D., Me.
Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct.
WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I.
Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass.
Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I.
Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I.
Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. J.
Rev. EDWARD BEECHER, D. D., N. Y.
Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., Ill.
Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C.
Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La.
HORACE HALLOCK, Esq., Mich.
Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H.
Rev. EDWARD HAWES, D. D., Ct.
DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio.
Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt.
SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn.
Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y.
Gen. O. O. HOWARD, Oregon.
Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa.
Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill.
EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H.
DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J.
Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct.
Rev. W. L. GAGE, D. D., Ct.
A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y.
Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio.
Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Minn.
Rev. J. W. STRONG, D. D., Minn.
Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California.
Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon.
Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C.
Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis.
S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass.
PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass.
Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass.
Hon J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa.
Rev. WM. T. CARR, Ct.
Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct.
Sir PETER COATS, Scotland.
Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng.
WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N. Y.
J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass.
E. A. GRAVES, Esq., N. J.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ill.
DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct.
A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass.
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y.
FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt.
JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., Ill.
Rev. E. P. GOODWIN, D. D., Ill.
Rev. C. L. GOODELL, D. D., Mo.
J. W. SCOVILLE, Esq., Ill.
E. W. BLATCHFORD, Esq., Ill.
C. D. TALCOTT, Esq., Ct.
Rev. JOHN K. MCLEAN, D. D., Cal.
Rev. RICHARD CORDLEY, D. D., Kansas.


CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., _56 Reade Street, N. Y._


DISTRICT SECRETARIES.

REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, _Boston_.
REV. G. D. PIKE, _New York_.
REV. JAS. POWELL, _Chicago_.

H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., _Treasurer, N. Y._
REV. M. E. STRIEBY, _Recording Secretary_.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

ALONZO S. BALL,
A. S. BARNES,
GEO. M. BOYNTON,
WM. B. BROWN,
C. T. CHRISTENSEN,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER,
S. B. HALLIDAY,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
CHARLES A. HULL,
EDGAR KETCHUM,
CHAS. L. MEAD,
WM. T. PRATT,
J. A. SHOUDY
JOHN H. WASHBURN,
G. B. WILLCOX.


COMMUNICATIONS

relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields to
the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the “American
Missionary,” to Rev. C. C. PAINTER, at the New York Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New
York, or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXIV. OCTOBER, 1880. NO. 10.

* * * * *




American Missionary Association.

* * * * *


OUR ANNUAL MEETING.

The Thirty-fourth Annual Meeting of the American Missionary
Association will be held in the Broadway Church (Rev. Dr.
Chamberlain’s), Norwich, Ct., commencing Oct. 12, at 3 P. M., at
which time the Report of the Executive Committee will be read by
Rev. M. E. Strieby, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. The Annual
Sermon will be preached by Rev. Wm. M. Taylor, D.D., of New York
City, Tuesday evening. Reports, papers, and discussions upon
the work of the Society, may be expected throughout Tuesday and
Wednesday. The following persons have promised to be present and
participate in the exercises, with others: Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D.,
Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, H. K. Carroll, of New York City; Rev. A. F.
Beard, D.D., Syracuse, N. Y.; Rev. Alex. McKenzie, D.D., Cambridge,
Mass.; Prof. Wm. J. Tucker, D.D., Andover, Mass.; Prof. Cyrus
Northrop, New Haven, Ct.; Rev. Sam’l Scoville, Stamford, Ct.; Rev.
Joseph Anderson, D.D., Waterbury, Ct.; Rev. Wm. H. Willcox, D.D.,
Malden, Mass. We also have invited Pres. Julius Seelye, Amherst,
Mass., and Hon. John P. Page, Rutland, Vt., and hope for favorable
responses. For reduction in railway fares and other important
items, see fourth page of cover.

* * * * *

In addition to the speakers from the North announced above, much
interest will be added to our Annual Meeting by addresses from some
of the prominent workers in the Southern field.

* * * * *

During the vacation of our schools and workers, there is a dearth
of intelligence from “the field,” which must be the MISSIONARY’S
apology for its leanness. The next number will be made fat with the
good things prepared for us at Norwich, and may be delayed on that
account, after which there will doubtless be abundance from our
teachers and pastors, who will by that time have their work well in
hand once more for another year’s labor.

* * * * *

The St. Louis School Board has added oral lessons in etiquette to
its course of studies. A few scholars read in turn five pages from
a manual of etiquette, and then a conversation is held on the topic
by teacher and pupils. We do not see why good manners are not as
essential as good grammar.

So says the _Congregationalist_, and so says the AMERICAN
MISSIONARY. In several of our Institutions at the South, a small
text-book on good manners is used with accompanying oral lessons.
Colored pupils take well to such instruction.

* * * * *

Chicago is the freest city in this country. There is no
discrimination except in brains and money. Every place is open to
the colored man. The schools of the city have white and colored
children on the same seats and in the same classes, and no
“kicking” is heard. But what is the strangest of all, there are
two colored ladies who teach schools composed of white as well as
colored.—_Ex._

* * * * *

It is possible we may yet go to the negro to learn many things,
especially the virtues allied to, and growing out of, patience
under provocations, of which certainly he has been a wonderful
example. The editorial fraternity of the country would do well to
imitate the example of the colored brethren, who at the meeting
of the Colored National Press Association, recently held in
Louisville, disposed cheaply of what has hitherto been regarded
as the editors’ inestimable and inalienable right by resolving,
“That when differences arise among us, we will eschew vituperation
and personal abuse, and that the columns of our papers shall be
kept free from everything calculated to detract from the tone and
character of journalism.”

* * * * *

The defense Roman Catholicism makes against Protestant ruffianism
varies according to environments; in Uganda it takes one form, in
the United States another; but it is good to see the necessity of
some form of it, as stated in one of the Roman Catholic journals
in Mexico as follows: “It is necessary that the Catholics rise
resolutely and make a rapid and voluntary movement in defense of
their belief. To-day, unfortunately, the Protestants come with
a subvention, and their teachings are extending throughout the
whole country. They circulate their writings at the lowest prices,
even give them away, sometimes in tracts, sometimes in papers,
which is the favorite method of sowing the bad seed; and, sad to
say, in exchange, the Catholic weeklies are dying off for lack
of subscribers to sustain them. Protestantism is becoming truly
alarming among us.”

* * * * *

The colored Baptist churches of Virginia and South Carolina,
believing the time has come when they should go forth to the
millions of their fatherland with the Gospel, have sent out two
missionaries; and now the churches of Virginia unite in calling a
convention to meet at Montgomery, Ala., on the 24th of November.
This call is as broad as all the colored Baptist churches and other
religious bodies of the colored Baptists of the United States, and
is “for the purpose of eliciting, combining and directing the
energies of all the colored Baptists in one sacred effort for the
propagation of the Gospel in Africa.”

This may seem to some a somewhat narrow call, but it is for a broad
work—a work that shall yet elicit the energies of all our Father’s
children of whatever color and denomination, until the dark
continent shall be made glorious by the Sun of Righteousness.

* * * * *

Mohammedanism, whatever its affinity for Africa as it has been, and
its baleful power because of this, has no outlook for the future
of that sad, but soon to be made glad, continent. The _Foreign
Missionary_ well says: “If we consider only the physical condition
of success, it must be allowed that Islam has an immense advantage
in its central position and its vicinage to the field to be won.
There is much also in the greater similarity of character between
the Moslem and the heathen tribes as compared with Europeans, whose
habits are so utterly different from those of all African tribes.
But on the other hand, the forces of Christianity have now well
nigh surrounded Africa, and are pushing through a hundred avenues
into the interior. Discovery, time, commerce and civilization, are
handmaids of the Gospel as they are not of Islam. That can only
endure the dim light which survives from a past age. It belongs to
an age which has passed away, and to a type of civilization which
is everywhere sinking into decay.”

* * * * *


JUBILEE SINGERS.

These singers of world-wide fame will once more enter the “service
of song” for Fisk University. They have devoted their wonderful
voices to its benefit for six years, during which they left their
marvelous impress on vast and select audiences in America, Great
Britain, and the Continent, including the highest and humblest
in rank, and have reared as their monument the substantial and
beautiful Jubilee Hall, at Fisk University. The past two years they
have taken for needed rest, and in giving concerts for their own
benefit; and in dedicating themselves to the up-building of the
University, it is now for endowment, as it was then for building.

During all these years, their voices have been more and more highly
cultivated, without losing their freshness and originality, or
their power to move most deeply the hearts of vast audiences, as
was so signally manifested in the enthusiastic gatherings they met
recently at Chautauqua.

The name and fame of these Singers have been repeatedly
appropriated by unworthy imitators. This true Jubilee Troupe, when
again heard, will need no credentials except their own voices to
certify to the public that they are the original Jubilee Singers.

* * * * *

Gen. Garfield heard the Jubilee Singers when he was at Chautauqua,
and closed his eloquent speech with this beautiful tribute:

“I heard yesterday and last night the songs of those who were
lately redeemed from slavery, and I felt that there, too, was one
of the great triumphs of the republic. I believe in the efficiency
of forces that come down from the ages behind us; and I wondered
if the tropical sun had not distilled its sweetness, and if the
sorrows of centuries of slavery had not distilled its sadness, into
voices which were touchingly sweet—voices to sing the songs of
liberty as they sing them wherever they go.”

In his speech responding to a serenade by the “Boys in Blue” in
this city, he expressed this noble sentiment in reference to our
colored fellow-citizens—a sentiment which must become a fact
established beyond the possibility of successful assault before
there can be either peace or safety for the nation:

“We will stand by them until the sun of liberty, fixed in the
firmament of our Constitution, shall shine with equal ray upon
every man, black or white, throughout the Union. Fellow-citizens,
fellow-soldiers, in this there is all the beneficence of eternal
justice, and by this we will stand forever.”

* * * * *


_Atlanta’s Colored People._—Atlanta, and the world outside that
Chicago of the South, will doubtless be surprised to learn that her
colored people give in $250,000 of taxable property. There are over
six hundred who pay tax on values ranging between $100 and $1,000;
some forty ranging from $1,000 to $6,000 and over. In business
pursuits, there are 40 boot and shoe makers, 40 retail grocers, 75
draymen, 25 hackmen, 20 blacksmiths, 12 barbers, 2 tailors, several
boarding-house keepers, 2 caterers, 5 confectioners, 3 dealers in
fruits, 1 dentist, 1 undertaker, 1 veterinary surgeon, 1 mattrass
maker, and 1 billiard-table keeper. Of bootblacks, newspaper
venders, porters, peddlers, drummers, messengers, hostlers,
waiters, and those engaged in mechanical pursuits, we have no
special data, for they are numerous.

There are eighteen churches in the city, with an average membership
of 350, the three largest having each over 1,500. Over 5,000
children and adults are in the Sabbath schools, and 1,278 children,
about one-half in the public schools of the city. There are three
lodges of Good Templars among them, having a total membership of
about 200. Two lodges of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria
have a membership of some 500. The Brothers Aid Society number
some 250, and the Brothers of Love and Charity 75. The Gospel Aid
Society, Daughters of Bethel, and Daughters of Jerusalem—benevolent
institutions—number a total of about 600. The Masonic lodge has
some 50 members. There are lodges of Odd Fellows whose combined
membership exceeds 600. These institutions have encouraged them to
form habits of sobriety and economy, and imbued them with feelings
of charity and benevolence. There are five military companies, and
they show great proficiency in the manual of arms.

* * * * *


COMMON SENSE FOR COLORED MEN.

[The following letter with the above caption is from the New York
_Evangelist_, and was written by the Rev. Moses A. Hopkins, a
colored preacher of Franklinton, N.C. It contains so much truth,
and good, hard, common sense, that the MISSIONARY is constrained to
send it along. This is done with a slight but emphatic caveat in
regard to one paragraph, to which exception is taken as misleading.
To say “the pinching poverty which drove a few idle and ignorant
Freedmen to Indiana, Kansas, and Africa” does not come up to
the proportions, as the writer would imply that it does, of a
satisfactory explanation of this great movement which has taken
more than 40,000 colored people from their old to new homes, at
great expense, both of suffering and money.

From Florence, Ala., many of the most intelligent and well-to-do
of these people exodized. Among those who went to Africa were many
intelligent and thrifty men, sufficiently so to send out an agent
and arrange for the movement, with means to place themselves in
their new home, and they were unanimous in assigning reasons which
justified them in the experiment.—ED. MISS.]

Many designing men, “filled to the brim” with sledge-hammer
rhetoric and campaign eloquence, for more than a decade have “used
sorcery and bewitched the colored people” with their “cunning
craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive,” till many of the
Freedmen thought that the time had fully come when the last should
be first and the first last, and were waiting and watching for
their turn in the White House and Congress.

But having hoped against hope, till hope deferred and poverty had
saddened their hearts, most of them have turned their minds to
the soil, which now promises “seed to the sower and bread to the
eater.” On every hand “the valleys are covered over with corn,”
and God, the poor man’s Friend, has just granted the tillers of
the ground “a plentiful rain,” which causes “the outgoings of the
morning and evening to rejoice.”

The present prospect of a bountiful harvest has greatly inspired
our people to labor and to appreciate honest toil, and to remember
that the great mass of the Freedmen will make better plowmen than
Presidents, and better sowers than Senators. The pinching poverty
which drove a few idle and ignorant Freedmen to Indiana, Kansas
and Africa, has taught those who had the good sense to stay at
home, that God will not bless idleness and ignorance among any
people. Most of the Freedmen have decided to buy land and labor on
it; to build houses and dwell in them, “and to plant gardens and
eat the fruit of them”; to seek the peace of the country and the
cities where God has caused them to be carried away captives; and
to remember that in the peace and prosperity of this country shall
they have peace.

* * * * *


OUR SCHOOLS AND THE COMMON SCHOOL SYSTEM.

The settlers of New England showed their uncommon common sense by
the early establishment of Harvard and Yale—the nursing mothers of
the common school system which has made these States what they are.
These colleges are not the ripened fruit of the common schools,
but the creators of them. For these colleges, we are indebted
to a class of men among the Pilgrim Fathers, educated in the
universities of the old world, a class not to be found among the
colored people of the South, and because of which alone, if for no
other reason, their condition differs immensely from that of the
Freedmen, who have no ability to create the instruments by which
they can be lifted up from the degraded condition in which slavery
left them.

The deep-seated prejudice of the Southern white against the fact
of negro education, his bitter unwillingness to see the experiment
tried, coupled with his scornful incredulity that anything worth
the effort could be accomplished, made it certain that those
most deeply concerned, because of the new relation these people
sustained to them, in the elevation, through schools, of the negro,
would originate no efforts to this end. This gospel, like every
other, must be sent to those who are to be specially benefited by
it, and must be sustained, like all missionary enterprises, by
those who know its value, until it can vindicate itself to those to
whom it is sent.

It is not rash to say that, but for outside pressure, few, if
any, of the Southern States would now have a system of common
schools, provided for by State legislation, even for the whites;
even less bold is the assertion that, but for the proved results
of missionary schools for the education of the colored people,
the South, and a large proportion of those in the North, would
be utterly incredulous as to the possibility of making scholars
of the negroes; and that the common schools forced upon the
unwilling South by the constitutions formed by conventions in
which the Southern sentiment found no expression, would never have
gained favor as they have with the people, but for the trained
teachers which our schools and the schools of other societies have
furnished. As in New England, so in the South, the trained teacher
makes the schools, which are thus the children of the colleges and
normal schools.

Wherever we have been able to send competent colored teachers, the
whites are in favor of sustaining the common school system; and it
may with modesty be said, that the A.M.A., perhaps more than any
other agency, has won for it a place in the future of these States,
ten of which, according to the latest reports, appropriate $49,829
for normal instruction in colored schools, a large share of which
goes to institutions established by Northern charity, to carry on
a work the value of which had been fully proven by these schools
before these States contributed a dollar for such a purpose.

In 1878, out of a total school population in the recent slave
States, including the District of Columbia, of 5,187,584, 2,711,096
were enrolled, being nearly 62 per cent. of the whites, and
something more than 47 per cent. of the blacks. Nearly twelve
millions of dollars was expended upon the schools for that year,
and for the most part it has been very equitably divided between
the races, except in Kentucky and Delaware, in which States the
school tax collected from the colored people alone is appropriated
to colored schools.

Thus the teachers of negro schools have fought a great fight, and
have won substantial victories, for a system of education which is
to regenerate the South, and, more than any other and all other
agencies, is to convert elements of danger, which, neglected,


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Online LibraryVariousThe American Missionary — Volume 34, No. 10, October, 1880 → online text (page 1 of 7)