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AMERICAN MISSIONARY, DEC 1881 ***




Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, KarenD and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by Cornell University Digital Collections)









Vol. XXXV. No. 12.


THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

“To the Poor the Gospel is Preached.”

* * * * *

DECEMBER, 1881.




_CONTENTS_:


EDITORIAL.

PARAGRAPHS 353
FINANCIAL—APPEALING FACTS 354
ABSTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS AT THE ANNUAL MEETING 355
GENERAL SURVEY 357
SUMMARY OF TREASURER’S REPORT 367
ADDRESS OF SENATOR GEO. F. HOAR 369
EXTRACTS OF ADDRESSES RELATING TO GENERAL WORK 373


THE FREEDMEN.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL WORK 382
ADDRESS OF REV. C. T. COLLINS 383
ADDRESS OF REV. J. R. THURSTON 386
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION: PROF. CYRUS NORTHROP 388
HIGHER EDUCATION: PRES. E. A. WARE 390
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHURCH WORK 392
ADDRESS OF PRES. CYRUS HAMLIN 393


AFRICA.

REPORT ON FOREIGN WORK 395
ADDRESS OF REV. J. W. HARDING 397
ADDRESS OF REV. GEO. S. DICKERMAN 398
THE UPPER NILE BASIN: COL. H. G. PROUT 398


THE INDIANS.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 403
ADDRESS OF GEN. S. C. ARMSTRONG 403
ADDRESS OF CAPT. R. H. PRATT 405


THE CHINESE.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 406
THE CHINESE TO EVANGELIZE CHINA: REV. C. H. POPE 408
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 408
ADDRESS OF REV. GEO. F. STANTON 409
VOTE OF THANKS AND REPLY 410
ECHOES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 411


RECEIPTS 412

CONSTITUTION 416

* * * * *


NEW YORK:
Published by the American Missionary Association,
ROOMS, 56 READE STREET.

* * * * *

Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance.

Entered at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., as second-class matter.

* * * * *




American Missionary Association,

56 READE STREET, N.Y.

* * * * *


PRESIDENT.

HON. WM. B. WASHBURN, Mass.


VICE-PRESIDENTS.

Hon. E. S. TOBEY, Mass.
Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio.
Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis.
Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass.
Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D.D., Me.
Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D.D., Ct.
WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R.I.
Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D.D., Mass.
Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R.I.
Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D.D., R.I.
Rev. RAY PALMER, D.D., N.J.
Rev. EDWARD BEECHER, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D.D., Ill.
Rev. W. W. PATTON, D.D., D.C.
Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La.
Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D.D., N.H.
Rev. EDWARD HAWES, D.D., Ct.
DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio.
Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt.
Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D.D., Minn.
Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N.Y.
Gen. O. O. HOWARD, N.Y.
Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D.D., Iowa.
Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill.
EDWARD SPALDING, M.D., N.H.
Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D.D., Ct.
Rev. W. L. GAGE, D.D., Ct.
A. S. HATCH, Esq., N.Y.
Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D.D., Ohio.
Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Mass.
Rev. A. L. Stone, D.D., California.
Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D.D., Oregon.
Rev. L. T. CHAMBERLAIN, D.D., Conn.
Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D.D., D.C.
Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D.D., Wis.
S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass.
Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass.
Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa.
Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct.
Sir PETER COATS, Scotland.
Rev. HENRY ALLON, D.D., London, Eng.
WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N.Y.
E. A. GRAVES, Esq., N.J.
Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill.
DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct.
Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., N.Y.
FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt.
JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R.I.
Rev. E. P. GOODWIN, D.D., Ill.
Rev. C. L. GOODELL, D.D., Mo.
J. W. SCOVILLE, Esq., Ill.
E. W. BLATCHFORD, Esq., Ill.
C. D. TALCOTT, Esq., Ct.
Rev. JOHN K. MCLEAN, D.D., Cal.
Rev. RICHARD CORDLEY, D.D., Kansas.
Rev. W. H. WILLCOX, D.D., Mass.
Rev. G. B. WILLCOX, D.D., Ill.
Rev. WM. M. TAYLOR, D.D., N.Y.
Rev. GEO. M. BOYNTON, Mass.
Rev. E. B. WEBB, D.D., Mass.
Hon. C. I. WALKER, Mich.
Rev. A. H. ROSS, Mich.
Hon. JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN, Me.
Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass.
Hon. NELSON DINGLEY, Jr., Me.


CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., 56 _Reade Street, N.Y._


TREASURER.

H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., 56 _Reade Street, N.Y._


DISTRICT SECRETARIES.

REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, _Boston_.
REV. G. D. PIKE, D.D., _New York_.
REV. JAS. POWELL, _Chicago_.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

LYMAN ABBOTT,
ALONZO S. BALL,
A. S. BARNES,
C. T. CHRISTENSEN,
FRANKLIN FAIRBANKS,
CLINTON B. FISK,
ADDISON P. FOSTER,
S. B. HALLIDAY,
A. J. HAMILTON,
SAMUEL HOLMES,
CHARLES A. HULL,
CHAS. L. MEAD,
SAMUEL S. MARPLES,
WILLIAM H. WARD,
JOHN H. WASHBURN,
A. L. WILLISTON.


AUDITORS.

M. F. READING.
W. R. NASH.


COMMUNICATIONS

relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the
Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields to
the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the “American
Missionary,” to Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D., at the New York Office.


DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer 56 Reade Street, New York,
or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21
Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street,
Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a
Life Member.

* * * * *




THE

AMERICAN MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

VOL. XXXV. DECEMBER, 1881. No. 12.

* * * * *




_American Missionary Association._

* * * * *

We present our readers in this issue of the MISSIONARY, which
is a double number, an account of the proceedings of the 35th
Annual Meeting of this Association. For want of space we have only
given the important points of most of the papers and addresses,
endeavoring to preserve their spirit.

The paper of Pres. E. H. Fairchild will appear in the “Weekly
Witness” of Nov. 17, of which copies will be supplied gratuitously
to persons applying by postal card to the author at Berea, Ky.

Rev. Lysander Dickerman’s address may be looked for in the
“Congregationalist” at an early date.

The papers read by Miss Sawyer and Miss Emery will be reserved for
mention in the January MISSIONARY.

* * * * *

We send this number of the MISSIONARY to some persons whose names
are not among our subscribers, with the hope that they will read
it, and that their interest in the work which it represents will
be deepened. We believe that if any such will send us their
subscription for the Magazine, they will find themselves amply
rewarded for the outlay.

* * * * *

The inquiry is sometimes made as to the reasons for the steadily
increasing support given to the A. M. A. In answer we suggest:—1.
The increasing prosperity of the country. People have more to give
and they give more. 2. The careful management of the affairs of
the Association has probably given it a stronger hold upon the
confidence of the public. 3. The great reason, we believe, is
that the nation, after many fluctuating opinions in regard to the
Freedmen, has settled down to the conviction, voiced repeatedly
by Pres. Hayes and reiterated so emphatically in Pres. Garfield’s
inaugural, that the only safety for the nation and the Freedmen
is in their thorough education. The A. M. A. is now seen to have
steadily pressed forward from the beginning in this only true
method, and hence its work has come to be more fully appreciated.
The rapid growth of the colored population gives emphasis to the
demand for their Christian education. 4. Another reason is the
awakened conviction in Great Britain and America that the freed
people are destined by Divine Providence to take an important part
in the redemption of Africa. Our schools and churches, so well
fitted to prepare them for this work, are felt to deserve not only
support but enlargement.

* * * * *


FINANCIAL—APPEALING FACTS.

One year ago we asked our constituents to enlarge our receipts
_twenty-five_ per cent; the generous response was nearly _thirty_
per cent. We increased the appropriations of the year, but kept
safely within the income. At our recent Annual Meeting the appeal
was made for $300,000 this year—an increase over last of $56,000,
or 23 per cent. This appeal is based on no random figures. The
appropriations for this fiscal year are carefully made on the basis
of last year’s income, but in addition we most pressingly need the
means:—1. To finish and furnish two buildings, not provided for by
the Stone fund. They are nearly ready, but will be useless unless
completed. 2. To provide additional teachers, boarding and student
aid for the increased number of students in the new buildings in
Atlanta, Talladega, Tougaloo, New Orleans, Austin, Athens. 3. To
erect a boy’s dormitory at New Orleans, and a new building at
Memphis. As to the latter, Prof. Steele writes: “All the desks in
the lower rooms were filled at the end of the first week, and we
have been refusing admission to pupils in these rooms every day
since. Early last week the last seat in the Normal room was taken.
We seat 102 there. Since then I have placed small tables and chairs
in every foot of available space in the Normal room, raising the
number enrolled to 118. I am every day receiving letters from
young men and women in the country who wish to enter the school,
but I can in no way take more than two students in addition to
those now in the room. Of the 120 in the Normal department, 50
have taught school and all the rest expect to become teachers.”
Must we refuse education to more of such students and teachers?
The unexpended portion of the Stone fund is already appropriated
and is not available here. 4. To meet the urgent demands for
enlargement in the church work. 5. To increase our expenditures for
the Indians. The nation is aroused in their behalf and Congress
is ready to help. Now is the time for us to enlarge. 6. To double
our appropriation for the Chinese work. No outlay yields better
returns. 7. To build the John Brown steamer for the Mendi, and to
complete the $50,000 fund for the Arthington Mission.

These facts are our appeal. We add no words. The day has gone by
when our friends will be content with good speeches and resolutions
at the Annual Meeting. The hour has come for steady and effective
work. We are ready for it, and the tone of the meeting at Worcester
shows that our friends are also.

* * * * *


ABSTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS AT THE ANNUAL MEETING.

The Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting of the American Missionary
Association was held in Plymouth Church, Worcester, Mass., on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, November 1st, 2d and 3d, 1881.

As the bells in the church-tower finished chiming the “Missionary
Hymn,” at three o’clock Tuesday afternoon, Secretary Strieby called
the meeting to order, and in the absence of the President and
Vice-Presidents, Rev. S. R. Dennen, D.D., of New Haven, was chosen
to preside. After devotional services, Rev. Marshall M. Cutter, of
Medford, was chosen Secretary, and Rev. John L. Ewell and Rev. C.
P. Osborne Assistant Secretaries.

A Nominating Committee was appointed consisting of Rev. E. H.
Byington, Rev. E. P. Marvin and C. L. Mead, Esq.; also a Business
Committee consisting of Rev. Geo. M. Boynton, Rev. G. R. M. Scott,
and Geo. P. Davis, Esq.

The Treasurer, H. W. Hubbard, Esq., read his report, which was
referred to a Committee on Finance. The Annual Report of the
Executive Committee was made through Rev. G. D. Pike, D.D.,
District Secretary, and was referred _seriatim_ to appropriate
Committees. An hour was then spent in prayer and conference, with
special reference to the work in the South.

Tuesday evening, after devotional services, led by Rev. E. G.
Porter, of Lexington, Rev. C. D. Hartranft, D.D., of Hartford,
Conn., preached for the Annual Sermon a discourse appropriate to
the Communion, which followed it, from Matthew xxvi, 27, l.c.,
“Drink ye all of it.” The Lord’s Supper was administered by Rev.
Geo. W. Phillips, pastor of Plymouth Church, and Rev. Geo. H.
Gould, D.D.

Wednesday morning, a prayer meeting, conducted by Rev. A. P.
Foster, of Jersey City, was held at eight o’clock. At nine o’clock
the regular session began, the chair being occupied in turn by
Rev. L. T. Chamberlain, D.D., of Norwich, Conn., and Gen. O. O.
Howard, of West Point, Vice-Presidents. John H. Washburn, Esq., in
behalf of the Executive Committee, to whom was referred the matter
of amending the Constitution of the Association at the last Annual
Meeting, reported certain recommendations, which were referred to
a Special Committee, to report Thursday morning. Richard Wright,
Esq., of Augusta, Ga., colored, read a paper on “The Colored Man:
His Strength, Weakness and Needs.” President E. H. Fairchild,
of Berea College, Kentucky, read a paper on “Review of the
Anti-Slavery Contest, and estimate of its meaning and value with
reference to the Civilization of Africa and the World.” Secretary
Strieby made an address on “The duty of America in the Conversion
of the World, and especially in the Conversion of Africa.”
President E. A. Wane, of Atlanta University, Ga., read a paper on
“Higher Education.”

Wednesday afternoon. Prayer was offered by Rev. H. A. Stimson, of
Worcester. Gen. O. O. Howard made an address on “Our Social Needs
and their Remedy.” Gen. S. C. Armstrong, of Hampton, Va., reported
for the Committee on Indian work, and was followed by Capt. R.
H. Pratt, of Carlisle, Penn. A report of the Committee on Church
work was read by Rev. Cyrus Hamlin, D.D., who also made an address
upon the subject. Rev. J. E. Roy, D.D., Field Superintendent of
the Association, supported the report by interesting statements
illustrating the influence of the work among the colored people.
The report of the Committee on Educational work was read by Rev.
Charles T. Collins, of Cleveland, Ohio, and supported by Rev. John
R. Thurston, of Whitinsville.

Wednesday evening. Hon. E. S. Tobey, of Boston, President of the
Association, in the chair. Rev. William M. Gage, D.D., of Hartford,
offered prayer. Addresses on “Christian Education at the South”
were made by Rev. L. O. Brastow, D.D., of Burlington, Vermont;
Prof. Cyrus Northrop, of Yale College, and Hon. Geo. F. Hoar, of
the U.S. Senate.

Thursday morning. The prayer meeting at eight o’clock was led by
Rev. O. H. White, D.D. The regular session at nine o’clock was
opened with prayer by Rev. I. P. Langworthy, D.D., of Boston. Col.
Franklin Fairbanks read the report of the Special Committee on the
Constitution.

The following amendments were adopted: In Art. vi. the words,
“Recording Secretary,” and “of which the Corresponding Secretaries
shall be advisory, and the Treasurer ex-officio members,” are
omitted; and after “Secretaries” the words, “who shall also keep
the records of the Association,” are inserted. In Art. vii. after
“dismissing,” the parenthesis is omitted. Article viii. is omitted,
and Arts. ix. and x. are respectively numbered viii. and ix. The
consideration of Arts. iii. and v. were referred to a special
committee of thirteen, Col. Franklin Fairbanks, chairman, to report
at next Annual Meeting.

A letter from Hon. E. S. Tobey, President, declining re-election on
account of the pressure of other duties, was read, and resolutions
of thanks for his faithful services were unanimously adopted by
a rising vote. The Nominating Committee recommended Hon. Wm. B.
Washburn, of Greenfield, Mass., for President, and presented a list
of other officers, who were duly elected.

On motion of Rev. C. T. Collins, it was voted to memorialize
Congress for immediate and increased appropriations for education
at the South.

The report of the Committee on Chinese Missions was read by Rev.
A. E. P. Perkins, D.D., of Ware. A paper on the subject was read
by Miss Harriette Carter, of Mt. Vernon Church, Boston, where more
than one hundred Chinamen have had Bible instruction, and addresses
were made by Rev. Lysander Dickerman, of California, and by Rev. C.
H. Pope, of Machias, Me.

Rev. G. W. Harding read the report of the Committee on African
work, and addresses were made by himself, by Col. H. G. Prout,
late in the service of the Khedive of Egypt, and by Rev. Geo. S.
Dickerman, of Lewiston, Me.

Thursday afternoon. On “Woman’s Work for Woman,” papers were read
by Miss M. L. Sawyer, of Boxford, and Miss E. B. Emery, of Gorham,
Me., and addresses delivered by Mrs. A. K. Spence, of Nashville,
Tennessee; by Rev. E. N. Packard, of Dorchester; Rev. A. H. Plumb,
of Boston, and Rev. E. S. Atwood, of Salem.

The report of the Finance Committee, in the absence of Hon. J. J.
H. Gregory, chairman, was read by Rev. E. S. Atwood, and asked for
$300,000 for the ensuing year. Addresses were made by Rev. Geo. F.
Stanton, of Weymouth, and Secretary Strieby. District Secretary
Woodworth made a statement of Mr. Gregory’s recent gifts, amounting
to $15,000. Rev. A. H. Plumb, in a happy little speech, announced
$2,000 from an unknown donor, which he passed to the Treasurer in a
sealed envelope. Of the amount, $500 was for Berea College and $500
for Hampton Institute.

Thursday evening, after prayer by Rev. Lewis Grout, Rev. O. H.
White, D.D., for six years Secretary of the Freedmen’s Missions
Aid Society in London, spoke of English co-operation and of the
miseries of the slave trade in Africa. Henry D. Hyde, Esq., of
Boston, pressed the claims of the Association to more liberal
support, and John B. Gough, Esq., in a series of incidents, told in
his inimitable style, illustrated the capacity of the colored race
to be educated and elevated.

After some parting words from President Tobey, resolutions of
thanks to the churches, committees, pastors, choir and railroads,
and to the hospitable people of Worcester, and addresses in
response by pastors Lamson and Phillips, the meeting closed with
the benediction by Dr. O. H. White, to meet next year in Cleveland,
Ohio. Near the close of the session a beautiful white dove entered
the church and suggestively perched in a high niche over the pulpit
platform.

Notwithstanding the prevailing dullness of the weather during our
Annual Meeting at Worcester, there was nothing like dullness in
the meetings. Daily the capacious church was thronged with deeply
interested listeners. The high character of the addresses, the
absorbing interest of subjects discussed, the excellent music of
the ample choir, the completeness of arrangements by the local
committee, and their uniform courtesy and unremitting attentions,
and last, but not least, the generous hospitality of the Christian
people of the city, all conspired to make the occasion one to be
long and delightfully remembered.

The American Missionary Association turns with fresh hope and new
inspiration to the work of the coming year.

* * * * *


GENERAL SURVEY.

* * * * *


FREEDMEN.

The fortunes of the freed people during the current year indicate
a marked degree of progress. A healthy growth in all the branches
of our Southern work is quite discernible. It is strikingly evident
that the Freedmen are discovering the extent of the horizon
opening up before them through our educational institutions. At
one time, many of their leaders were attracted by the allurements
of political preferment, and counted nothing so good as position
in office, and many such, doubtless, there will be to the end of
time. There is, however, an increasing number among them who are
coming to realize that intelligence and character developed by
Christian education have a commanding worth and solid value that
cannot be conveyed by an appointment or imbibed during the sessions
of a legislature. This good result has been hastened by Teachers’
Institutes, conducted by Southern and Northern educators, among the
black and also the white citizens, sometimes large numbers of both
classes mingling in the same convention.

Possibly never have our missions been more richly blessed by the
outpourings of the Holy Spirit than during the past year. Whole
classes in a school have indulged the hopes of a new life, and the
rich experiences gathered during revivals have been borne forth
into the villages and the country during the summer months by our
students. Sabbath-schools have everywhere received due attention,
and temperance work has been well sustained and productive of much
good. Missionary meetings and societies have been encouraged,
and the gifts from the hard earnings of the poor to the cause of
missions abroad, indicate what may be hoped for when the colored
people become educated and prosperous.

* * * * *


EDUCATIONAL WORK.

Our eight Chartered Institutions, including Berea College and
Hampton Institute, which were founded by this Association, have
experienced a year of unusual prosperity. The number pursuing
a higher grade of study has been continually on the increase,
and the quality of the work done, as testified to by many who
have witnessed it, indicates that the grade of teachers has been
improved, not only by self-culture on the part of those who have
been long in service, but also by accessions from among the best
educators in the country. Three of our teachers have received
honorary degrees from important colleges at the North, and others
have been encouraged by many tokens of appreciation and esteem.

During the year, the Tillotson Institute at Austin, Tex., took
possession of its new building, a brick structure one hundred and
four feet long, forty-two feet wide and five stories high. From the
first this school has met with the hearty approval and sympathy of
a large number of the best citizens of Austin. The new building
was opened in January, and before the close of the spring term 107
students had availed themselves of its advantages.

The college at Berea has added $50,000 to its permanent endowment
fund; the Fisk University has received $4,000 endowment for student
aid. At Hampton, two new buildings, one for Indian and one for
Negro girls, have been provided by the friends of the Institution,
and a new Academic Hall, in place of one that was burned, has been
dedicated. At Tougaloo, Miss., a boy’s dormitory of brick, with
accommodations for about 75 students, has been completed. This
building was made especially necessary by the ravages of fire,
which destroyed the wooden structure that had served in a very
inadequate way both for school rooms and boarding purposes.

Other buildings at Straight University, New Orleans; Fisk
University, Nashville, Tenn.; Talladega College, and Atlanta
University, provided by the gift of $150,000 by Mrs. Valeria G.
Stone, have either been completed, or are in a good state of
progress. At New Orleans, there was added to the half square of
land on Canal street, before owned by the A. M. A., the remaining
half. Upon this site has been erected a neat three-story building,
ninety-two feet on Canal street and ninety-one feet on Roche Blave
street, containing dining-room, kitchen and laundry for the whole
school, parlor, bath-room, apartments for teachers and dormitories
for about 60 girls.

At Talladega, Stone Hall, for boys, has been completed. It is
three stories high, with a basement, and contains printing office,
reading-room, bath-room and dormitories for 76 students. With a


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