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NATOMA




The original of this book is in
the Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright restrictions in
the United States on the use of the text.



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924098732682




f. ■•• •^=


NEW YORK : G. SCHIRMER








ALL RIGHTS OF EEPRODUCTION, TKANSLATION AND

REPEESENTATION RESERVED FOE ALL COUNTRIES

INCLUDING NORWAY, SWEDEN AND DENMARK

Copyright, 1911, by G. Schirmer

22452



CHARACTERS

WITH THE CAST FOR THE FIRST PERFORMANCE OF THE OPERA AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

HOUSE, PHILADELPHIA, ON FEB. 23, 1911.

Don Francisco de la Guerra, a noble
Spaniard of the old regime

Father Peralta, Padre of the Mission
Church

JtTAN Bautista Alvarado, a young Spaniard

Jose Castro, a half-breed

Pico

Kagama

Brtjzzo, an innkeeper

Paul Merrill, Lieutenant on the U. S. Brig
"Liberty"

Barbara de la Guerra, daughter of Don
Francisco

Natoma, an Indian girl

Chiquita, a dancing-girl



■ bravos, comrades of Castro



Bass


Mr.


Huberdeau


Bass


Mr.


Dufranne


Baritone


Mr.


Sammarco


Baritone


Mr.


Preisch


Tenor


Mr.


Crabbe


Bass


Mr.


Nicolay



Tenor

Soprano
Soprano



Mr. MacCormack

Miss Lillian Grenville
Miss Mary Garden



Two American Officers ; Sergeant ; Alcalde ; Milk-Boy ; ladies, dignitaries, soldiers, friars,
acolytes, nuns, convent-girls, vaqueros, market-women, Spanish dancers,
reapers, vineyardists, shepherdesses, sailors

The scene of Act I is laid on the Island of Santa Cruz, off the coast of California,
two hours' sail from the mainland; Act II, in the plaza of the town of Santa Barbara
on the mainland, in front of the Mission Church ; Act III, inside of the Mission Church.

Epoch, 1820, under the Spanish regime.



[5j



FOREWORD

Vizcaino, the navigator, in a letter to the
King of Spain written in 1603, remarked on
the comeliness and unusual intelligence of the
Califomian Indian girls. There was with-
out doubt among some of these inhabitants
a strain of the ancient Aztec race.

The literal translation of Natoma is "The
Maid from the Mountains."



[7]



NATOMA

An Opera in Three Acts



ACT I

The scene shows the hacienda of Don Fran-
cisco on the Island. Porch left, with
entrance showing interior with windows.
Semi-tropic treatment, out of doors.
Back drop shows blue waters of the
Santa Barbara Channel, with dim line
of mainland in distance. An arbor and
vine-covered well are right, with stone
bench around part of well. Main en-
trance shows pathway centre. The
scene is rich in coloring — a woodland
dell. At rise of curtain Don Fean-
cisco is discovered at top of hill, gaz-
ing over the water toward the mainland.

Time, afternoon and evening of a summer's



SCENE I

Don Francisco

Alas! Impatient father that I am!
No sign as yet from o'er the water
To tell the coming of my daughter.
The day with leaden feet is creeping,
While my impatient heart is leaping.

Oh child of love, oh child of grace,
I see in thee thy mother's face.
And like a perfume rare.
Her gentle spirit fills the air.
My Barbara, my Barbara!
(Seats himself on bench near the well.)

When as a youth I led my bride
O'er mountain-chain and oceantide,
We dreamed a while to here remain.
Afar from our beloved Spain.

We wandered o'er this island bower.
And found herein a perfect flower;
It was a message from above,
To bless the union of our love.



The flower she gave to me — my bride ;
A winsome rose, our joy, our pride.
[Entwined within our hearts it grew
As fleeting years above us flew.

The Reaper claimed my bride his own.
And left me with my rose alone.
This sunset isle I hold a shrine
Wherein to guard my trust divine.]

Oh child of love, oh child of grace,
I see in thee thy mother's face.
And like a perfume rare.
Her gentle spirit fills the air.
My Barbara, my Barbara!

{Horn heard'off stage.)

Alvarado, Castro, Pico and Kagama {off
stage). Ale I aie!

Don Francisco. Can it be my daughter.?
{Enter Alvarado, Castro, Pico and
Kagama. )

Alvarado. Hail, Don Francisco, hail!

D. Francisco. Welcome, Juan Bautista,
and also your good friends ! Our island home
is greatly honored by your coming.

Alvarado {coming forward). My friend
and comrade, Don Jose Castro !

D. Francisco. Welcome, Senor! your
name is known to me.

Castro. Don Francisco, I salute thee!

Alvarado. Pico and Kagama of Santa
Inez, both mighty hunters and brave fellows !

D. Francisco. Caballeros, I greet you.
So seldom do I leave this isle in my advancing
years, you must regard me quite a stranger
in the land.

All. At your service, Senor!

(Alvarado and companions take seats.)

D. Francisco {claps hands; two servants
appear on porch). Tortillas! Mescal! My
guests will drink with me.

{Servants bow and exeunt into had-
•)



[9]



10



NATOMA



Alvarado. We beg the privilege of a
hunt upon the ranges of your hills, where
bound the antlered stag and vicious boar.

D. Francisco. My isle is yours.

{Servants bring out small tables, etc.)

D. Francisco. Senores, my house is hon-
ored by your presence ! {Lifts flagon; all
drink. )

Alvarado. And Barbara, my fair cousin,
I fain would greet her and present my com-
rades.

D. Francisco. I would she were here to
greet thee.

Castro {aside). She has not come.

D. Francisco. This is the day of her re-
turn. Her convent years are ended. Since
early morn I've peered out o'er the water to
find in every sail and white-winged gull the
coming of my daughter. [Yet know I well,
'twill be at eventide and when the summer's
day has waaed. Father Peralta will bring my
daughter home.]

Alvarado

I oflFer a toast, good friends,
And bid you homage pay

To one whose beauty lends
New lustre to the day:
Barbara de la Guerra!

Alvarado, Castro, Pico and Kagama.
Barbara de la Guerra!

D. Francisco. You fill my heart to over-
flowing.

Alvarado. Come, we must away. The
shadows deepen early in the mountains. Our
sport awaits us.

D. Francisco. Good luck attend you! I
beg on your return to come this way. My
house, my cellar, my boats, are at your com-
mand!

The Four. Adios, Senor! Adios, Seiior!
(Exeunt. Exit Don Francisco into
hacienda. )

SCENE II

(Natoma comes up over hill, leading
Paul by the hand. She pulls him
toward her and stamps her foot.
Both are playful and laughing.)



Natoma. When I say to you "follow,"
you must obey me !

Paul. You little witch! Where are you
leading me? This is all so strange to me.

Natoma. No matter. This is an island of
good cheer. We are alone, for at this hour
good Don Francisco takes his siesta. Come!
come!

{Leads Paul to seat around well. Paul
seats himself on bench; Natoma sits
on the grass in front of him.)

Paul. Ah! Natoma, this island hath in-
deed a charm! Oh! Natoma, 'tis you who
casts a spell o'er all my senses.

Natoma. No one has ever spoken unto
me as you do. Your voice is soft and gentle.
Are all Americanos fair and good to look
upon ?

Paul. You little wild-flower!

Natoma. Tell me about your people and
the great land far o'er the water. Speak, and
speak again, until I bid you cease — and that
will never be.

Paul

Gentle maiden, tell me,

Have I seen thee in my dreams —

I wonder.?
When above my pillow
All the night sheds starry gleams —

I wonder?

Ever am I haunted

By a pair of eyes so deep

And gleaming,
In whose wealth unfathomed
Lie the shafts of love asleep

And dreaming.

Every glance she gave me

Woke my heart and roused ray soul

From slumber.
Gentle maiden, tell me.
Have I seen thee in my dreams —

I wonder.''

Come, Natoma ! [We have rowed and wan-
dered round this island from morn till even-
tide. Every question you have asked me I
have freely answered. Yet you tell me noth-



NATOMA



11



ing of yourself.] Tell me of your people,
tell me of Natoma, and see! (^taking the
abalone-amulet, which is hanging from the
necklace around Natoma's neck, in his hand.)
What is the secret of this charm you guard so
closely ?

Natoma (crossing her hands against her
throat and shrinking from Paul).

Would you ask me of my people,

Of my father and his father.?

Then I bid you now to listen.

From the clouds came my first father;
Out he stepped upon the mountain
Over there upon the mainland,
In the early dawn of morning,
And his people followed after.
Soon there came an awful famine,
And his people paled with hunger.
Paled with hunger and the famine.
Then he went down to the ocean
Where the waters roll unceasing,
And he prayed unto the Spirit,
To the Spirit of the mountain.
To the Spirit of the waters.
And lo, his prayer was answered.
At his feet, in untold numbers.
Tossed up by the mighty ocean.
Found he there the abalone.
Rich with meat the abalone.
With this meat he fed his people.
Brought to life his starving people.
And with prayer they thanked the Spirit.

[In the twilight of his lifetime.

On his couch within the wigwam.

Called the Chief his sons about him,

Spoke he to the eldest thus-wise:

"I have been upon the mountain.

With the Spirit in communion;

There the mighty Spirit gave me

As a token, with his blessing.

This fair shell of abalone.

Filled with earth from off the mountain

Sealed within the abalone.

Bade me guard it in my bosom

As a deed of gift and plenty

From the Spirit to his people.

Thou the strongest, thou the elfiest



Shalt succeed to my dominion.
On thy neck I hang the token."
He then turned his back upon them
And his son became the Chieftain.

In the ages past this happened.
But the gift has come unbroken
From one Chieftain to the other.
From the father to the eldest.
From the mountain to the ocean
Has the gift come down unbroken.]

In the old age of my father
All my brothers had departed.
Lost in battle with the stranger.
Then my father called me to him.
And he said to me, "Natoma,
Thou the strongest, thou the eldest,
Shalt succeed to my dominion.
On thy neck I hang the token.
Guard the token in thy bosom
As a deed of gift and plenty
From the Spirit to his people."

Paul. I salute thee, Natoma, Princess,
Queen and Ruler of this fair and radiant
country !

Natoma.

Vanished are my father's people.
Now the stranger comes as chieftain.

Paul (pointing to hacienda). And there
is where lives Barbara, the beautiful Barbara.''
Tell me, Natoma, is she so very beautiful.?

Natoma. Barbara, my Barbara! She is
more beautiful than the fawn in springtime !
She is more lovely than the poppies on the
hillside ! My Barbara ! Her eyes are like the
stars in blue water. Her lips are red berries
in the dew. When you see her you must love
her. Oh, Paul! When you see her you will
love her!

It had to be ! It had to be ! Oh, Paul !
Take me, beat me, kill me, but let me be your
slave ! (Falls at Paul's feet.)

Paul (kneeling to her, and taking her
hands in his). You little wild-flower, Na-
toma!



12



NATOMA



SCENE III



(Natoma lifts her head, listens, springs
to her feet; her whole demeanor
changes; she runs to top of hill.)

CoNVENT-GiKLS (o/f stage). Ohe! ohe!
ohelohe!

Natoma. Barbara !

Convent-Girls (off stage)

Afloat, afloat in our open boat,

We swing on the evening tide ;
[Afar, afar on the sandy bar,]

The low waves gently glide.
We come, we come.

Fair isle of the Sunset sea,
To bring her home,

Sweet Barbara, home to thee.
(Servants and retainers come out of
hacienda. )

Chorus or Retainers

Our gentle mistress comes at last.

So lift your voices high ;
Her dreary convent days are past,

And turned to revelry.
All hail, all hail to the gallant sail
That brings our joy, our pride !

CoNVENT-GiEis (entering at back)

We swing on the evening tide.

Ohe! ohe! ohe!
The low waves gently glide,

Ohe! ohe! ohe!
Afloat, afloat in our open boat.
We swing on the evening tide.
(Father Peealta appears, leading

Barbara fez/ the hand.)

Full Chorus

She comes ! she comes !
With loud acclaim, we cheer her name,

And Barbara welcome home.
We cheer her name with loud acclaim!
All praise to thee, our Holy Church;

We thank thee for thy grace
And for thy many blessings ! Praise to thee !

Barbara. Natoma !



Natoma. Barbara, my Barbara!

D. Francisco (coming out of hacienda).
My daughter! (folds her in his arms).

Barbara. Father, dear Father! (They
embrace. )

D. Francisco (turning to Peralta). To
you, illustrious Padre, my house, and all who
with me abide, are indebted.

Peralta. The debt is ours, Don Fran-
cisco! In the beauty of her character your
daughter has been an inspiration to all around
her. She proclaims with pride and yet with
modesty the nobility of both your houses.

(During this scene Paul has been stand-
ing apart, gazing at Barbara. Their
eyes have met. Natoma watches
them. Barbara drops her eyes and
then looks at Paul again. Paul's
eyes do not leave Barbara. Castro
is seen by the audience secreted in the
arbor. )

D. Francisco. Good friends, I bid you all
to enter and drink with me to this glad re-
union. But stay! (seeing Paul) we are hon-
ored by the presence of a stranger.

Natoma. This is Sefior Paul, from the
big ship that came from o'er the waters.

Paul. I am Lieutenant Paul Merrill of
the Brig "Liberty," from the United States.
May I do homage to your beautiful daugh-
ter.-' (bowing low.)

D. Francisco. Come, Father Peralta, and
you, Sefior, and good friends all, complete my
joy by drinking round my board from a cask
of Spanish wine. Come within !

Ensemble

While shadows darken around
We bid thee welcome home;
Where happiness and peace shall be found.

Hallowed the ground.
No more shall thy footsteps bid thee to roam.
We welcome thee home, welcome home !

(Exeunt all except Natoma; Castro
still in arbor.)



NATOMA



13



SCENE IV

Natoma {alone)

Oh the wonder of his speaking,
Like the wind upon the mountain,
Like the river through the valley!
Speak to me again, my chieftain!
(Casteo appears suddenly and confronts
her.)

Castko. Can I believe my eyes? You, the
idol of our people, the daughter of your
mighty father, to fetch and carry for these
dogs !

Natoma. Castro, what do you mean?

Castro. Hear me ! The Evil One has cast
a spell over Natoma, or she would not leave
her father's people to spend her days with
strangers. Listen to me ! Listen to me ! Your
people left the vaUey in disdain, but in the
crags of the mountains they pray for a
chieftain ! Ah ! Natoma. Behold me ! They
call me Jose Castro. It is not my name. I
am Tu-ol-um-ne, he who leaves no trail. Your
people are my people! Come with me! {at-
tempting to take her hand.) Together we
will sweep the land of these strangers, as the
winter tempest shakes the leaves from the
trees !

Natoma. Don't touch me! You are no
Indian !

Castro. Softly ! softly ! I would not make
you angry ; and yet, methinks, if that young
Lieutenant from the big ship asked you to
his wigwam, you would not say him nay. Ah,
ha ! ha ! ha !

Natoma. You half-breed!

{As she goes off, Castro calls out to her,
but under his breath.)

Castko. It is not you he will ask to his
wigwam. It is Barbara. I know it. I saw
the glances pass between them. I know it,
even if I am a half-breed.

{Enter Alvarado, Pico and Kagama.
Twilight commences to fall.)

Castro. She has come.

Alvarado. What, Barbara?

Castko. The Padre brought her with the
convent-girls; they are all inside, and with



them that young officer. Barbara has eyes
for no one but him ; she is entranced.

Alvarado. You are demented!

Castro. It is true!

Alvarado. Nonsense! Wait until I see
her ! Here, Kagama, Pico, our serenade !

SERENADE

Alvakado

When the sunlight dies,

When the night wind sighs,
When the dove is asleep in the tree,

I will come, my love,

With the stars above.
To pay homage, fair cousin, to thee.

Where thy feet have pressed,

Are the poppies blessed,
And the violets yield their perfume ;

'Tis the blushing rose.

Everywhere it blows.
From thy beauty has stolen its bloom.

Oh, my lady-love, oh, my lady-love.
Leave me not in the dusk to repine ;

Oh, my lady-love, oh, my lady-love,
Bid me sing to thy beauty divine!

SCENE V
(Barbara appears in doorway of porch. )
Barbara. Juan Bautista !
Alvarado. Fairest cousin! Stand where
thou art, and put to shame the jewels of the
night, that now begin to deck the heavens.

Oh, my lady-love, oh, my lady-love.
Leave me not in the dusk to repine ;

Oh, my lady-love, oh, my lady-love.
Bid me sing to thy beauty divine!

Barbara. I do recall that song under my
convent window.

Alvarado. 'Twas I who sang it to thee
from behind the manzanita bush. Ah ! beaute-
ous Barbara, how sweet of you to remember!

Barbara. Fie upon you, Juan ! You sang
that same song to Chiquita — or was it Tere-
sita.'' — and you swore it was written for her
and her alone.



14



NATOMA



Alvaeado. Nay, nay ! to thee alone !
Barbara. A little bird flew into the con-
vent window with the message ; you know lit-
tle birds can sometimes fly even over convent
waUs.

AiiVARADO. 'Tis calumny! Listen to me,
I implore !

{Drinking-chorus heard faintly from
hacienda. )

Chorus

To him who drinks the wine of Spain,
All other joys in life are vain.
And Bacchus laughs to see us quaff
The good old wine of Spain.
Tra la la, la la la !

Barbara (looMng over the scene). Oh,
wondrous day, that brings me home once
more

Alvarado (interrupting). Hear me, Bar-
bara ! You're no longer a girl, but a woman.
How impatiently have I waited to greet you
as such, for you and I together bear the names
that claim distinction throughout the land.

Chorus

And Bacchus laughs to see us quafi'.
The good old \^ine of Spain.

Alvarado. To-morrow's your Fiesta over
there on the mainland, when all the world will
pay their tribute to the rich and beautiful
Barbara de la Guerra ! But to-night, before
this new world is all hers, Juan Bautista, her
cousin, tenders his devotion, homage and love.

Barbara. 'Tis very sweet of you, Juan
Bautista !

Alvarabo. My life is yours, my love is
yours, I have but one ambition: to protect
you, to shield you from the world. Grant me
the privilege, grant me the right!

Barbara. I'm sure of your devotion and
protection, Juan !

Alvarado. Yes, yes ! Place your hand in
mine, and let me announce to-morrow to our
expectant friends, that the Church shall pro-
nounce the union of our two great names !



Barbara. What, Juan Bautista I you are
making me a proposal of marriage?

Chorus

Tra la la la! Tra la la la!

Alvarado. I am, sweet Barbara, with
every drop of my heart's blood, my life! my
love ! my soul !

Fair one, listen to my vow of love,

A vow that from my very soul is spoken!

Fair one. Paradise and heaven above

I'd give to ravish from thy lips one token.

Barbara ! To hold thee in my arms I'm yearn-
ing-
Fair one, gaze within my eyes
To see the fire that still alone for thee is burn-
ing !
Fair one, I pray, give me thy reply.
On thy answer will I live or die !
Bid me to live or die !

Chorus of Girls (off). Barbara! Bar-
bara;!

Barbara. Yes, yes, I'm coming!

Alvarado. There was a time I was your
choice. What has changed my cousin ? There
is another!

Barbara. Juan Bautista! Juan!

Alvarado. And you but a convent-girl!
Ha, ha ! Innocence, thy name is Barbara de la
Guerra !

Chorus of Girls Barbara ! Barbara !

Barbara. Not another word ! — I'm com-
ing.

Alvarado. You prefer a stranger!

Barbara. Your every word is an insult!
I leave you ! (Exit into hacienda. )

Alvarado. Santa Maria! I, Juan Bau-
tista Alvarado, to be jilted by this convent-
girl, who is mine by every right! 'Tis the
damned Americano ! I will have his life !

(Natoma is seen secreted in arbor, listen-
ing.)

Castro (comes out of shadow). Not so
fast! There is a better v/ay. To-morrow at
the Fiesta there'll be an hundred of our
friends ! When the gayety is at its height, I
will have swift horses ready. We can steal



NATOMA



15



the girl away to the mountains, where none
can follow. The whole country will be with
us, for they hate the Americanos ! Be guided
by me.

AiiVARADO. Castro, you are right ; we must
have patience — ^but to-morrow!

(Natoma comes forth from the arbor
with water-urn on her shoulder, crosses
stage and exit behind hacienda.)
Alvarado. I never liked that girl. She
broods too much.

(Night begins to fall.)

SCENE VI

(Convent-Girls come out of hacienda,
with Barbaea ira their midst.)

Convent-Girls

The hour has come for us to sever
Those happy days we've spent together;
For now the evening shades are falling,
And home the convent bells are calling.

Forget us not in all the splendor.
The homage new-found friends will r^der ;
For time will make our hearts the fonder,
No matter where thy steps may wander.

(While the Convent-Girls are singing
these verses, Alvarado, Castro, Pico,
Kagama and, finally, Paul, pass one
by one in front of Don Francisco
and Barbara, going up stage and fol-
lowing Convent-Girls and Peralta.
They sing portions of the following
lines as a final salute.)

We bid thee all good-night.
Until the morning light
Our glad reunion brings.

(Exeunt all excepting Barbara and Don

Francisco.)
Convent-Girls (im, the distance).
Ohelohe!
We swing on the evening tide,
The low waves gently glide.
Oh^ ! ohe ! ohe !

(Don Fkancisco and Barbara em-
brace.)



Barbara. Let me linger here awhile, and
once again breathe the fragrance of the scene
^-my childhood home.

D. Francisco. A little while, sweet Bar-
bara, and then repose ; for to-morrow hath a
myriad pleasant duties for my child. Good-
night, good-night ! To-day the years roll
backward in their flight. (Exit into hacienda.)

SCENE VII: FINALE

Barbara (to herself). 0, wondrous night!
The shadows fall around me ; in thy protecting
arms I am enfolded. Be not too bold, O
stars ; I see you peeping thro' the trees. Pray
turn thine eyes away, wondrous night! —
I have not dreamed of love !

My confidant, oh silver moon,
How oft with thee I've held commune,
And wondered if the tale be true.
That lovers should confide in you.

Ah, bid me now, when none can hear.
To whisper in thy kindly ear
The greatest secret ever told,
A story new, and never old.

I love him ! In secret hear my vow :
I love him! For none shall know but thou.
I love him ! Ah, chide me not, I pray !
I love him ! 'Tis all my heart can say,
I love him!

Paul (entering hurriedly). Let come
what will, the magnet of her beauty draws
me back again.

Barbara. Senor !

Paul. Fair maid, I could not leave thee, I
.could not part without one word with thee
alone.

Barbara. Beware! The danger

Paul. Danger.?

Barbara. My father-^

Paul. Danger !

Tho' the seas were tempest-tossed,

Tho' the waves ran mountain-high,

I would their strength defy.

And breast the storm that bears me close to

thee,
Ah, my belovfed, close to thee !



16



NATOMA



Bakbaea (aside)

His voice awakes my very soul !
Ah, I dare not reply !
My faltering lips cannot deny
My all too willing heart.

Paul

I love thee, I love thee !

Here I proclaim my adoration!

Loved one, my soul cries out to thee !

Baubara
I tremble ! my heart is beating !

Paul

Turn not away ; it is the voice divine,
The voice of love that pleads ; one word


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