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Pictorial guide to Boston and the country around .. online

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PICTORIAL GUIDE

3 9 ■■

TO

BOSTON



AND



The Country Around



With Maps and Plans



BOSTON
THE G. W. ARMSTRONG DINING ROOM & NEWS CO,
1902




ARY'OF
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PIES Received

31 1902

COPVRIQHT ENTRY

CLASS (XXXa No.
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CONTENTS.



TAGr..

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 7

The Main Facade, 9; The Entrance, 10; Staircase Decorations, by
Chavannes, 12; Corridor Decorations, by Chavannes; "Muses Greet-
ing the Genius of Enlightenment," 14; Bates Hall, 16; Delivery
Room, 21; Edwin A. Abbey's "The Quest of the Holy Grail," 21;
Children's Rooms, 26; Ceiling Decorations, by John Elliot, "The
Triumph of Time," 27; Lecture Hall, 27; Sargent Hall, 27; Decora-
tions by Mr. Sargent, "The Triumph of Religion," 28; Special Libra-
ries, 29; Fine Arts Room, 29; Interior Court, 30; Other Libaries, 33.

THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS AND OTHER COLLEC-
TIONS 34

The Collection of Casts, 35; The Collection of Paintings in Oil and
Water-Colors, 37; The Allston Room, 41; Examples of the English
and French Schoolf^-XVIIL and XIX. Centuries, 42; Examples of
the Work of Mod'errt ■Painfers, 43; The Print Rooms, 43; Other
Museums an.<t,Colleet03*is, 4^.

PARKS AND PLEASURE GROUNDS FOR THE PEOPLE. 46

The Common, 48; Shaw Memorial, 51; Public Garden, 51; North
End Patk, 52; Charlesbank/ 54; The Fens, 56; Olmsted Park, 56;
Arnold Arboretum,- 57; Franklin Park, 57; Marine Park, 58; Metro-
politan ^ark System, 59.

OLD BOSTClN. ;. - . . : 64

Old South Meeting House, 64; Old Corner Bookstore, 66; City
Hall, 67- Province Court, 67; King's Chapel, 68; Old State House,
70; State Street, 72^; Ouincy Market, 73; Faneuil Hall, 74; Hancock
Tavern, 76';" Marshall Street, 76; North Square, 77; Garden Court
Street, 77; Old Christ Church, 79; Hull Street, 79; Copp's Hill Bury-
ing Ground, SO; (iranary Burying Ground, 80; State House, 82;
Beacon Hill, 90; Court House, 9L

OUTLYING DISTRICTS OF BOSTON 94

East Boston, 94; Charlestown, 94; Brighton, 96; West Roxbury, 98;
Roxbury, 100; Dorchester, 101; South Boston, 102.

CAMBRIDGE, HARVARD COLLEGE AND MOUNT

AUBURN 103

Cambridge, 103; Harvard College, 105; Mt. Auburn Cemetery, 115.

THE HARBOR AND BEACHES 117

The North Shore, 117; The South Shore, 121; Plymouth, 126.

TROLLEY TRIPS FROM THE HUB 130

I., Along the North Shore to Cape Ann, 131; II., Through the
Beautiful Mystic Valley, 135; III., Concord Way, 138; IV., Through
Brookline to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 145; V., Through the Newtons
to Norumbega Park and Waltham, 149; \'I., To Dedham, 152; VII.,
Through Quincy to the South Shore, 154; VIII., To Pilgrim
Land, 156.

VISITORS' MEMORANDA i57

Railroad Terminals, 157; Coastwise Steamers, 160; Transatlantic
Steamers, 162; Transportation About Town, 163; Hotels, 166; Restau-
rants, 167; Theatres and Places of Amusement, 169; Clubs, 170;
Churches, 172; Societies, Fraternities and Organizations, 176; Public
Buildings, 182; Shoppers' Guide, 182.

CONVENIENCES FOR THE TRAVELING PUBLIC. ... 185



BROADWAY CENTRAL HOTEL,

NEW YORK.




667 to 6rr BROADWAY, COR. THIRD STREET

Midway between Battery and Central Park.

THIS IMMENSE PROPERTY

By far the largest in New York, and one of the Great Hotels of the World.

THE LOCATION IS UNSURPASSED.
THE NEW RAPID TRANSIT ELECTRIC LINES passing the doors run the
entire length of Broadway from the Battery to Central Park, passing- all the
Fashionable Stores, Theatres and Principal Attractions of the City.

ALL CROSS-TOWN. CARS TRANSFER AT BROADWAY WITH THE
ELECTRIC LINES, taking guests direct to the Hotel from eyery ferry, steamer,
dock or station.

GRAND CENTRAL DEPOT Passengers can take LEXINGTON AVENUE
ELECTRIC CARS, one block east of tlie station, direct to or from the Hotel to
42nd St., or Fourth Avenue Street Cars direct to ASTOR PLACE or BOND ST.,
one block in front.

Passengers ARRIVING BY ANY OF THE FERRIES, or either FOREIGN
or COASTWISE STEAMERS, can take any Cross-Town Car, or walk to Broad-
way and take Electric Cars direct to the Hotel ; or via the 6th Avenue Elevated,
stopping at Bleecker Street Station, ^ minutes from Hotel.

THE CENTRAL WILL BE RUN ON BOTH THE
AMERICAN AND THE EUROPEAN PLAN .-. .-.
The regular Tariff Charges for each person will be ;

For Room only $1.00 and upsvards.

For Room and Board $2.50 and upwards.

For Single Meals 75 cents.

Rooms with Parlor or Bath E.xtra.
For full particulars, send for circulars, colored maps, and other information to

TILLY HAYNES. proprietor.



UNITED STATES HOTEL
BOSTON



BROADWAY CENTRAL HOTEL
NEW YORK



ILLUSTRATIONS.



Page.

Boston Public Library — Exterior Frontispiece

Floor Plans 8, 9

" Statue of Sir Harry Vane 11

" " " Periodical Room 13

" " Grand Staircase 15

" " " Mural painting, "Chemistry," by Puvis

de Chavannes 18

" " Mural painting, "Physics," by Puvis

de Chavannes 19

' " " Mural painting, "The Muses," etc.. by

Puvis de Chavannes 20

" " " Painting, "Frieze of the Prophets," by

John S. Sargent ^b 25

" " " Entrance to Children's Room 26

" Mural painting, "The Lunette," by John

S. Sargent 28

" " " Fine Arts Room 30

Bates Hall 3i

" " " Interior Court 32

Museum of Fine Arts — Cast, "Diskobolos" 34

" " " " In the Corridor . 35

Floor Plans 2>^^ 2,7

" " " " Portrait of Washington, by Gilbert

Stuart 39

Copley Square 40. 4 1

Museum of Fine Arts — Painting, "Pot of Basil," by John W.

Alexander 42

" " " " Painting, "By the Riverside," by Henri

Lerolle 43

The Common in Winter 47

Review of Boston School Boys on the Common 49

Ball's Equestrian Statue of Washington, Public Garden 50

Agassiz Bridge, The Fens 52

Entrance to Pinebank. Olmsted Park. 53

Balanced Rock, Franklin Park • 54

The Overlook, " " 55

Old South Meeting-House 65

Old Corner Book Store. • ~ 66

King's Chapel . . 69

Old State House 70



ILLUSTRATIONS.

Page.

Faneuil Hall — Exterior j^)

Interior 74

Armory of the Ancient and Honorabic ivrti.'.cry C.m-^any 75

Old Christ Church ^ 78

Copp's Hill Burying Ground 81

Tremont Street, corner Park Street 83

Massachusetts Stale House, Extension and PubLc Grwun^lj 85

" " " Representatives' Chamber 87

Exterior 88. 89

Suffolk County Court House — Exterior 91

"Old Ironsides" — Charlestown Navy Yard 95

Bunker Hill Monument 97

Lake Hibiscus. Forest Hills Cemetery 99

Harvard College — Class of 1877 Gate 104

Johnston Gate 107

Phillips Brooks II, u J 108

" " Architecture Building 109

Common and Soldiers' Monument, Cambridge 11 1

Entrance to Mount Auburn Cemetery 114

Shipping at T Wharf 118

A Glimpse of Boston Harbjr 119

Revere Beach 120, 121

Boston Light 122

Hull, from Paddock's Landing 123

Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth 125

Cole's Blacksmith Shop. Plymouth 126

William Harlow House. Plymouth 127

The Common. Lexington 137

Old North Bridge, Concord 141

The Wayside Inn, Sudbury 143

The Brookline Boulevard 147

Norumbega Tower 149

Echo Bridge, Newton Upper Falls 150

A Glimpse of the Neponset River 153

Homes of the Presidents Adams 155

North Union Iitation 158

South Terminal Station 161

Boston City Hospital Relief Station 163

Hotel Touraine 165

Colonial Theatre, Interior 169

Symphony Hall — Exterior 171

Interior 172

Horticultural Hall 175

Masonic 1 emple — Exterio- 177

Gothic Hall 178

Corinthian Hall 179



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O busy people, dwelling within her gates,
who have kept no tally of the city's gains,
these pages may prove helpful and instructive.
They are not exhaustive, but they aim to give as
clearly and briefly as possible information concern-
ing places and objects of interest, and the easiest
way of reaching the same. Do not scorn the index,
and when you wish to spend a day in making the
acquaintance of some spot in your native town see
if it does not give you a clew which will make the

fulfillment of your desire complete

Traveler, may this little book help you to see and
to enjoy that which has been preserved of Old
Boston, which belongs by right of historic interest
to every American, and also the many treasures
which the great city, through the genius of her
sons and daughters, has been acquiring as the
centuries have slipped away. Come you from far
or near, be your condition what it may — only so
that you have a desire to see and to learn — Boston
has a message for you. May these pages help you
to understand that message




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THE PUBLIC LIBRARY.



'The Crowning Possession of Boston.'



As the gilded dome of the State House, towering above the
city on the hill where blazed the beacon of old, seems to pro-
claim the patriotism and civic pride which have made Massa-
chusetts a torch-bearer in the vanguard of the States, so the
Boston Public Library, "Built by the People and Dedicated to
the Advancement of Learning," is a fitting memorial of those
lofty spirits who, at every stage of her development, have
spoken for education as the best safeguard of a people.

This Library, founded in 1852, was the pioneer in the United
States of free libraries supported by general taxation. Next to
the Congressional Library in Washington, it is the largest and
most important collection of books in America, and it is fittingly
housed in one of the most beautiful library structures in the
world. This noble building stands at the head of Copley Square.
The most prominent object in this interesting locality, it has as
near neighbors Trinity Church, the masterpiece of the late H. H.
Richardson; the IMuseum of Fine Arts, and the new Old South
Church, successor to the Old South Meeting-House in Wash-
ington Street. The State, by giving part of the land which
forms its site, and many public-spirited citizens, by contributions
and bequests, have united with the city in the effort to make
this library representative of all that is worthiest in American
institutions. The free public library system is known in count-
less cities and towns; travelling libraries are carrying instruction
and entertainment to many a lonely farm-house or humble work-
shop; slowly, but surely, an appreciation for the best in art and



8



GUIDE TO BOSTON.



literature is permeating tke masses; and in all this work for the
bettering of humanity, Boston has been a pathfinder and an
inspiring power. In this building and its decorations she has
done much toward arousing and fostering a love for true art, and
this art influence is destined to be far-reaching and beneficent.
The architect of this building was INIr. Charles F. McKim, of the
New York firm of McKim, Mead & White. The corner-stone
was laid Nov. 28, 1888. The building was completed and thrown
open to the public for use in March, 1895. The total cost of the
building, including all decorations contracted for, was $2,368,000.




caa^ft CO.



CENTRAL LIBRARY. GROUND FLOOR.



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY.



9



The Library is two hundred and twenty-five feet long, two hun-
dred and twenty-seven feet deep. Its height from the sidewalk
to the top of the cornice is seventy feet. The material used is
Milford granite. In color this granite is a grayish white, which,
in some lights, becomes faintly tinged with pink. The Library is
in the Italian Rennaissance style of architecture, is quadrangular
in shape and surrounds an inner court. The chief characteristics
of the building are its simplicity and the accentuation of hori-
zontal lines of composition.
The main facade, looking east over Copley Square, consists of




ISSUE DEPARTMENT LOBBY MAIN STAIRCASE HALL




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LI „ ^ ^ ^ _ _ ^ATES HALL
C AT A LOG U



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IDDDDDD^DDODDOia Do



91



CENTRAL LIBRARY, SECOND FLOOR.



10 GUIDE TO BOSTON.

a heavily built lower story supporting an arcaded second story.
Above the arcade is a narrow frieze, which on each facade of the
building bears an inscription. On the Dartmouth Street side:
"The Public Library of the City of Boston, Built by the People
and Dedicated to the Advancement of Learning, A. D.
MDCCCLXXXVIIL" On the Boylston Street side: "The Com-
monwealth Requires the Education of the People as the Safe-
guard of Order and Liberty." And on Blagden Street:
^MDCCCLIL Founded Through the :\Iunificence and Public
Spirit of Citizens."

Above the frieze is a noble cornice, fitly crowning the facade.
This cornice is considered one of the triumphs of American
architecture. The whole building rests upon a granite plat-
form which gives it a dignified elevation above Copley Square.
This platform extends entirely round the three facades of the
building.

The entrance on Copley Square is by three arched doorways.
Each arch is closed with heavy wrought-iron gates. Immedi-
ately above is the inscription. "Free to All." Above the main
entrance, under the three central windows, are carved medallions
bearing the seals of the Library, the City, and the Common-
wealth. The triple-arched entrance leads into the main vesti-
bule, and thence into the entrance hall. The floor, walls, and
vaulted ceiling of the vestibule are of pink Knoxville marble, the
floor inlaid with brown Knoxville and Levanto marbles. The
doorways to the entrance hall are copied from the Temple of
Erectheus on the Akropolis at Athens. In a niche on the left
is a bronze statue by 'Sir. ]\IacMonies, of Sir Harry V^ane. gov-
ernor of Massachusetts in 1636-37. The low, broad entrance
hall is divided into aisles by heavy piers of Iowa sandstone.
Corridors running from it to the right and left lead to the news-
paper room., the catalogue room, and to the interior court. The
ceiling is vaulted with domes in the side bays. In the penetra-
tions of the arches, between the piers, in the main aisle, are the
names of six eminent Bostonians — Adams, Emerson, Franklin,
Hawthorne, Longfellow, Pierce. In the side domes are the
names of twenty-four more illustrious citizens, arranged in
groups of four. The theologians, Channing, Eliot, Mather and



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY.



11



Parker; the reformers, Garrison, Mann, Phillips and Sumner;
the artists, Allston, Bulfinch, Copley and Stuart; the historians,
Bancroft, Motley, Parkman and Prescott; the scientists, Agas-
siz, Bowditch, Gray and Rumford; the jurists, Choate, Shaw,
Story and Webster. The floor is of Georgia marble inlaid with
brass intagsia representing the signs of the zodiac. Near the
stairs are the names of men prominently connected with the
founding and early history of the Library: Bates, Bigelow,
Everett, Jewett, Quincy, Ticknor, Vattemare and Winthrop. Off
the left corridor are the catalogue room, offices, a coat room, and
next to this an elevator. Off the right corridor are toilet rooms
for men and women, a public telephone station, and a public
stenographer's office. From this corridor also opens the news-
paper reading room.
The Library takes
more than three hun-
dred newspapers, of
which over eighty
are foreign papers,
coming from the
principal cities of the
world. These papers
are conveniently ar-
ranged on racks and
tables, and may be
freely consulted by
visitors. Opening
from the newspaper
room are the two
periodical rooms. The
Library subscribes
to about fifteen hun-
d r e d periodicals,
coming from all parts
of the world. Like
the newspapers, the
periodicals may be BRONZE STATUE OF SIR HARRY VANE.

,, J , „„ By MacMonnies.

consulted by any one. Vestibule, Entrance Hall, Boston Public Library.




12 GUIDE TO BOSTON.

Directly opposite the main entrance rises the grand staircase,

the sides of yellow, richly variegated Sienna marble, and the
steps of an ivory-gray French marble. Half way up the staircase
is a wide landing, guarded on each side by couchant lions —
on large granite pedestals. These lions — the work of Mr. Louis
St. Gaudens — were the gifts of the Second and Twentieth Mass-
achusetts Volunteer Infantry, in memory of their comrades who
fell in the Civil War. At the landing double oak doors open
upon a balcony which overlooks the interior court. From the
landing the staircase separates to the right and left and ascends
to the staircase corridor.

Let us pause to notice the staircase decorations. The
panels that encircle the walls of the staircase are oc-
cupied by paintings by the late Puvis de Chavannes, one
of the most distinguished of modern French painters. These
pictures may be most advantageously studied from the staircase
corridor. From this point, as one looks toward the window
over the staircase landing, the two most striking panels of the
series are seen, the one on the left depicting Chemistry, that
on the right Physics. In the former panel mineral chemistry is
typified by an experiment which is going on in a retort, while
the processes of organic and vegetable chemistry are shown by
the decaying body of a beast, which, in returning to the earth
from which it came, fertilizes the soil and luxuriant flowers are
springing up around it. In the rocky background of the picture
a fairy stands with uplifted wand, as if to direct the spirits who
attend to the experiment going on in the retort. Physics was
happily explained by the artist in the following words: "What
is, for example, the most important element in physics? In
Edison's country there can be but one reply — electricity. And
what is the most striking manner in which electricity is used?
For the transmission of news by telegraph. News is of two
kinds, good and bad, and the incarnation of these two kinds in
two different personages at once suggested itself. I aimed,
above all, to express my idea simply." It needs no interpreter
to point out which of the figures is the type of good news. Now^
considering the panels on the side walls of the staircase, we
shall begin with the one on the left, Philosophy. The scene is




ONE OF THE PERIODICAL ROOMS.



14 GUIDE TO BOSTON.

a garden in Athens; Plato stands in the foreground discoursing
with one of his disciples, while others are seen in the distance
engaged in conversation or absorbed in study. In the back-
ground rises the Akropolis, crowned by the Parthenon. In
Astronomy are seen types of those primitive observers of celestial
bodies, the Shepherds of Chaldea. Standing upon a rocky ledge,
their vigil shared by a woman who looks out from a tent of crude
construction, two scantily clad men arc absorbed in contempla-
tion of the countless stars in "Heaven's blue vault." In the third
panel, that of History, are the ruins of a temple, where, in former
ages, men had worshipped their gods. The Doric column indi-
cates a former colonnade, now crumbled by time. History, with
laurelled brow, stands upon the broken steps which once led to
the shrine, and seems to implore the Past to reveal its secrets.
By her side a naked youth bears the book and torch of science.
Following the wall around the panels on the opposite side we
find Pastoral Poetry symbolized in the figure of A^irgil. He stands
by a clump of slender trees, in a landscape of quiet beauty. In
the distance two shepherds are reveling in the delights of nature.
In Dramatic Poetry Aeschylus appears in the foreground sitting
upon a cliff overlooking the sea, considering his tragedy of
"Prometheus Bound." In the background the artist has sketched
a scene from the play. Prometheus, condemned by the gods to
ages of torture for stealing the divine fire and placing it in maia's
possession, lies bound upon a rock which rises abruptly from
the sea. His naked body is exposed to the attacks of the vulture
which hovers above. Rising from the water and floating about
him in the air the Oceanides seek to charm and soothe him by
their songs. The last panel. Epic Poetry, represents Homer as
the wandering minstrel of the heroic age. He is seated on a
stone by the roadside, his lyre lying on the ground. The two
figures standing beside him personify the Iliad and Odyssey.
The former wears a helmet and carries a spear, in token of the
continual warfare which is her theme. The latter has an oar for
her adventurous career.

The corridor decorations, also by Puvis de Chavannes, repre-
sent the Muses Greeting the Genius of Enlightenment. The wall is di-
vided into five high-arched panels. The lower part of the central



■S' C



n o




16 GUIDE TO BOSTON.

panel is interrupted by the door into Bates Hall. Here the
artist skilfully adapted his design to the formal conditions. Tn
explaining his difficulties in an article in Harper's Weekly, he
said: "I could only unite my five arched panels in one single
composition by joining them at the top, the middle space being
much shorter than the others; and as the stone wall is cut into
regular festoons, I was obliged to paint skies in these arched
spaces. So I determined to join them immediately under the
arch by a straight line indicating the sea horizon, and to place
the Genius in the centre arch, while the Muses would quit the
earth and soar toward him at the sound of his voice." The
foreground is the grassy summit of a hill with slender saplings
growing along its crest, and beyond it the sea. The Genius of
Enlightenment, a naked youth, occupies the centre of the dec-
oration above Bates Hall door. He is resting on a cloud and
holding rays of light above his head. Rising from the ground
the inspiring Muses, five on the left-hand side and four on the
right, float in the air, moving gracefully toward the Genius and
extending their arms in gestures of welcome. On each side of
the door is the statue of a seated female figure, the one on the
left representing Study, and the one on the right Contemplation.

From the staircase corridor one enters the chief public rooms
of the Library. At each end is a small lobby, the one on the
right leading to the delivery room, the one on the left to the
children's room. This gallery also opens into Bates Hall, the
general reading-room. The floor of the corridor and lobbies is
of Istrian marble, with patterns of yellow Verona. The vaulted
ceiling of the corridor springs on one side from the column.*^ of
the arcade, and on the other from "dummy" capitals.

Bates Hall, the large public reading-room, is entered from
the corridor through a small vestibule. The doorways from this
vestibule to the corridor and to the private staircases leading
right and left to the rooms of the mezzanine story contain beauti-
ful wrought-iron gates, bought for the Library in Venice, where
they had originally belonged in some palace. Bates Hall is two
hundred and eighteen feet long, forty-two and a half feet wide,
and it is fifty feet to the crown of its arches. The ends of the
hall are semi-circular, with half-domed ceilings. The barrel-



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18



GUIDE TO BOSTON.




PHOTO GUI' VRIOH FED, l8>^6, BY FOSTER BROS.


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Online LibraryW. E BelkePictorial guide to Boston and the country around .. → online text (page 1 of 14)