W. F. (William Forsell) Kirby.

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inferiorum plaga postica argenteo-iridescente, atro-maculata ;
abdomine fusco fasciato."

The report in the " Zoological Journal " is almost the same
as the above ; but the Editor objects to the name Petrophila,
as preoccupied in Botany.

GENUS MARGARONIA. (Margaroniidce.)

Margaronia, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 358 (1826?);

Walker, List Lepid. Ins. Brit. Mus. xviii. p. 518 (1859);

Moore, Lepid. Ceylon, iii. p. 324 (1886).
MargarodeS) Guenee, Spec. Gen. Lepid. Belt, et Pyr. p. 324

(1854); Lederer, Wien. Ent. Mon. vii. p. 398 (1863);

Meyrick, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. 1854, p. 296, nom.

praocc.

This is a widely distributed genus, chiefly tropical or sub-
tropical, including rather long-winged species, of a pearly-white
or grass-green colour, with hardly any markings.

MARGARONIA ARACHNEALIS.
(Plate CLIIL, Fig. 3.)

Margaronia arachnealis, Walker, List Lepid. Ins. Brit. Mus.
xviii. p. 527, no. 21 (1859).

This Moth is found at Sierra Leone.

" Very vivid green. Body beneath, and legs white or glau-
cous. Head white about the eyes. Palpi blackish toward the
tips, white beneath. Antennae pubescent. Abdomen with a



270 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

blackish apical tuft. Fore femora ochraceous towards the tips ;
fore tibiae cupreous-brown, with a broad white band. Wings
with a dark cinereous fringe. Fore-wings with a slender
cinereous costal line, with black marginal points, and with a
blackish discal dot. Hind-wings with the fringe greenish-
white towards the interior angle. Length of the body, six
lines ; of the wings, sixteen lines " ( Walker).

GENUS GALLERIA. (Galleriida)

Galleria^ Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Suppl. pp. 419, 462 (1798);

Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 369 (1826?); Treitschke,

Schmett. Eur. ix. (i) p. 42 (1832); Von Heinemann,

Schmett. Deutschl. (2) i. (2) p. 208 (1865).

The antennae of the male are furnished with a tuft of hair

beneath at the base ; the palpi are longer in the female than in

the male, and the wings are long and entire ; the fore-wings

with twelve nervures. The genus is typical of a small family

having sixteen-legged larvae, which are parasitic in bee-hives

and bees' nests.

GALLERIA MELLONELLA.

(Plate CLIIL, Fig. 4.)
Tinea mellonella, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed x.) i. p. 537, no. 257

(1758); id. Faun. Suec. p. 358, no. 1383(1761).
Tinea cereana, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. xii.) i. (2), p. 874,

no. 282 (1767).

Galleria cerella, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i), p. 51 (1832).
Galleria cereana^ Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 295

(1834)-
Galleria meUonella, Curtis, Brit. Ent. xiii. pi. 587 (1836);

Kirby, Eur. Butterflies and Moths, p. 412, pi. 61, fig. 13,

(1883).

This Moth is a native of Europe and Western Asia. It
expands from an inch and a quarter to an inch and a half.



HYPOCHALCIA. 271

The fore-wings are ashy-grey, varied with lighter and darker.
From the base to the middle the wings are tinged with whitish,
containing dark brown atoms. On the costa and along the
margins of the fringes are dark brown streaks. The inner
margin is pale yellowish, with a number of purplish-brown,
short, raised, felt-like streaks. The hind-wings are pale ashy-
grey, sometimes brownish-grey, with paler fringes edged outside
with white, and bordered on the inner side by a yellow line.

The female is larger than the male, and has a stout brownish-
grey abdomen, with an ovipositor. The fore-wings are darker,
shorter and straighter, and the hind-wings are much paler,
almost white, with only the marginal area shaded with grey,
and dark nervures.

The larva is stout, and dingy white, with very small brown
tubercles, each with a fine hair. The head is chestnut-brown,
the cervical plate is darker, and a whitish line is sometimes
indistinctly continued on the back.

It lives in bee-hives, where it feeds on the wax, and does
much mischief. The pupa is reddish brown.



GENUS HYPOCHALCTA.

Hypochalcia, Hubner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 368 (1826?);
Von Heinemann, Schmett. Deutschl. (2) i. (2) p. 165
(1865).

This genus belongs to an extensive family of small moths,
with long slender bodies, long narrow fore-wings, and broad
rounded hind-wings. They are allied to the Grass Moths, and
much resemble them in shape, though not in colour. They
are often called <f Knot-horns " by collectors, because some
genera (including Phyds, Fabricius, the type of which is
P. roborella^ Denis & Schiffermiiller) have a tuft of scales on
the antennae of the male, near the base. In other genera, as






272 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

in Hypochalcid) which we are now considering, the antennae are
not tufted. The Phycida were a favourite group of the late
M. Ragonot ; and his monograph of the family is now being
published in vols. vii. and viii. of Romanoff's "Memoires " (vide
antecL, vol. iv. pp. 190, 192). In Hypochalcia, the labial palpi
are long, and horizontally produced, with a long filiform
upturned terminal joint. The maxillary palpi are filiform,
parallel, and appressed to the face. The female is much
smaller than the male.

THE DINGY VENEER. HYPOCHALCIA AHENELLA.

(Plate CZ///., Fig. 5 )

Tinea ahenella, Denis & Schiffermiiller, Syst. Verz. Schmett.
Wien. p. 135, no. 32 (1776) ; Zincken in Germar, Mag.
Ent. iii. p. 120 (1818).

Tinea aeneella, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. viii. figs. 41, 58 (1796?).
Phycis ahenella, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i)p. 144(1832).
Araxes ahenella, Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 316



The Dingy Veneer is found in Central and South Eastern
Europe. It expands from three-quarters of an inch to more
than an inch.

The fore-wings are greyish-brown, more or less dusted with
ochre-yellow, and crossed transversely by two broad, ill-defined,
dark cherry-red bands, which coalesce at the inner margin ; the
first of these is straight before the middle, and the second is
waved behind the middle. These bands are sometimes very
indistinct, and the whole of the surface of the wings is then
almost uniform. The hind-wings are yellowish-grey, with
whitish fringes.

GENUS PALP ARIA. (Palpariidce?)

Crambus, Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Suppl. pp. 420, 464 (1793);
Leach, Edinb, Encycl. ix. p. 135 (1815); Zeller, Chilon, et



PALPARIA. 273

Cramb. p, 14(1863); Von Heinemann, Schmett. Deutschl.
(2) i, (2) p. 117 (1865); nee Latreille ; nee Haworth.
Palparia^ Haworth, Lepid. Brit. p. 481 (1812), nee Wing.

This genus is generally called Crambus ; but in 1810
Latreille fixed C. semi-rubellus of Scopoli (one of the Phyridce)
as the type of that genus. I therefore adopt for it the very
expressive name applied by Haworth to Crambus^ auct, and its
allies.

These are rather small moths, with very long, straight palpi,
narrow fore-wings, and broad hind-wings. The fore-wings are
streaked in various proportions with brown, ochreous, and
white ; and the hind- wings are uniform brown, or white. They
are called "Grass Moths" by collectors, and are readily disturbed
by anyone walking through a meadow, when their light wings
make them look very conspicuous ; but presently they vanish,
settling head downwards on a grass-stem, and folding their
wings so closely round the body that they may easily escape
observation.

Some of them, belonging to a group to which Hiibner gave
the generic name of Catoptria, are remarkable for the broad
silvery stripes on the wings. One of these we have figured.

THE PEARL VENEER. PALPARIA PINELLA.

(Plate CLIII., Fig. 6.)
Tinea pinella, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. x.) i. p. 539, no. 272

(i75 8 ); Clerck, Icones, pi. 4, fig. 15 (1759).
Tinea pinetella, Linnaeus, Faun. Suec. p, 355 (1761).
Tinea conchella, Hiibner, Vog. und Schmett. Taf. 44 (1792);

id. Eur. Schmett. viii. fig. 38 (1800).

Chilo pinetelluS) Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i), p. 94(1832).
Crambus pinetellus, Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 323

(1834); Kirby, Eur. Butterflies and Moths, p. 411, pi. 6i f

fig. 10 (1883).

16 T



274 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

The Pearl Veneer is a native of Central and Northern
Europe, and the Eastern Mediterranean Region. It measures
about an inch in expanse. The fore- wings are yellowish-brown,
with the inner margin paler. From the base extends a long,
silvery-white triangle, to beyond the middle of the wings, and
between this and the hind-margin is a large oval silvery-white
spot. The hind-margin is dotted with black, and the fringes are
leaden grey. The hind-wings are white, with a slight bluish lustre.

The moth is found in pine woods in July and August.

GENUS OMMATOPTERYX. (Palpariida^
Eromene, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 366 (1826?); Zeller,

Chilon. et Cramb. p. 52 (1863), nom.praocc.
Euchromius, Guenee, Europ. Micro-Lepid. Ind. Meth. p. 86

(1845); Meyrick, Handb. Brit. Lepid. p. 396 (1895),

nom. prceocc.

This is one of the prettiest genera of the Family to which
it belongs ; and the only British species can easily be recog-
nised by the row of sub-marginal ocellated spots on the fore-
wings.

THE NECKLACE VENEER. EROMENE OCELLEA.

(Plate CLI1L, Fig. 7.)

Palparia ocellea, Haworth, Lepid. Brit. p. 486 (1812).
Phycis funicuklla, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix, (i), p. 200

(1832).
Araxes ocelka, Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust iv. p. 316



The Necklace Veneer is found in Temperate Europe, west
to Madeira, and eastwards to Asia Minor. It expands about
three-quarters of an inch.

The fore-wings are dull golden, dusted with black. There
is no first transverse line, but across the middle of the wings
runs a pale broad golden band, bordered on both sides with dull






DONACAULA. 275

brownish, In the middle of this band is a silvery transverse
streak. On the hind margin appears a similar golden and
silvery band, which cuts off a triangle at the apex.

Below this, along the fringes, are four velvety-black marks,
each ornamented with a golden spot, and fine golden streaks.
The fringes are yellowish-grey, and are separated from the
apical triangle by a silver line. The hind-wings are white.

It is not a common species in England.

GENUS DONACAULA. (Chilonida!)
Chilo, Zincken in Germar, Mag. Ent. ii. p. 33 (1817) ;

Treitschke, Schmett, Eur. viii. p. 293 (1830) ; ix. (i), p. 60

(1832) nee Guenee^ re sir.

Topeutis, pt. Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 366 (1826?).
Schoenobius, pt. Duponchel, Cat. Meth. Lepid. d'Eur. p. 312

(1864) ; Zeller, Chilon. et Crarnb. p. 3 (1863).
Donacaulcty Meyrick, Handb. Brit. Lepid. p. 401 (1895).

This genus and its allies resemble Palparia, but are larger
moths, with narrower wings in proportion, and are found
among reeds, and other water-plants, in the stems of which the
larvae feed.

THE DARK HOOK-TIP VENEER. DONACAULA MUCRONELLA.

(Plate CLIIL, Fig. 8.)
Tinea mucronella, Denis & Schiffermiiller, Syst. Verz. Schmett.

Wien. p. 136 (1776).

Tinea straminella, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. viii. fig. 284 (1802?).
Chilo mucronellus, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i), p. 67
(1832).

The Dark Hook-tip Veneer is a native of Central and South-
Eastern Europe. It expands about an inch.

The fore-wings are pale straw-colour, dusted with brownish,
with a dark shade from the base to the apex, and the costa in

T 2



276 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

front of this rather broadly paler. The hind-wings are yellowish-
white. There is a white anal tuft. The female is usually smaller
and paler yellow than the male, with snow-white hind-wings.

The moth appears at the end of May, and in June. The
larva lives in reeds.

FAMILY PTEROPHORID^E.

This Family was formerly placed at the end of the
Lepidoptera, between the Tinea and the Orneodida ; but the
moths are now considered to be nearly allied to the Pyralidcz,
on account of their long, slender, body, antennae, and legs,
with strong spurs, and the long and rather narrow wings, which
are held extended like those of a Crane-Fly, or Daddy Long-
legs, which the moths greatly resemble when at rest. But the
chief character which distinguishes these moths from nearly
all other insects, is that, in most of the species, the fore-wings
are more or less deeply cleft in two, and the hind-wings are
divided, almost to the base, into three distinct feathers.

The larvae have sixteen legs, and are hairy, as are also some

of their pupae.

GENUS ALUCITA.

Alucita, Linnaeus, Syst.Nat. (ed. x.), i. p. 542 (1758) ; Poda, Mus
Graec, p. 94 (1761); Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (2),
p. 225 (1833), nee Fabricius\ nee Stephens.

Pterophorus, pt. Geoffroy, Ins. Paris, ii. p. 90, (1762).

The type of this genus is the following :

THE WHITE-PLUME MOTH. ALUCITA PENTADACTYLA.

(Plate CLVIIL, Fig. 9.)

Alucita pentadactyla^ Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. x.), i. p. 542,
no. 304 (1758) ; id. Faun. Suec. p. 371, no. 1457 (1761) ,
Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. ix. fig. i (1800); Treitschke,
Schmett. Eur. ix. (2), p. 249 ("1833).



ORNEODES. 277

Pterophorus pentadactylus^ Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv.
p. 371 (1835) ) Kirby, Eur. Butterflies and Moths, p. 415,
pi. 62, fig. 19 (1883).

The White-Plume Moth is found throughout the greater
part of Europe and Northern and Western Asia. It expands
about an inch.

It is white with a silky gloss, only the eyes being black.
The wings are ample, and deeply cleft.

The larva feeds on sloe, and on various fruit trees. It is
pale green, with a white line on the back, and an ochre-yellow line
on the sides. On all the segments there are small raised dusky
dots, set with brown hairs.

The pupa is coloured like the larva, and is spotted with black,
the spots on the belly being smaller and reddish. On the back
there is a whitish grey pubescence.

FAMILY ORNEODID^E.

The moths belonging to this Family differ from the Ptero-
phoridce by their much shorter and broader wings, each being cleft
almost to the base into six separate feathers. The moths rest
with their wings expanded, and in this position resemble small
Geometra. The larva of the only British species is naked, and
lives in the buds of honeysuckle.

GENUS ORNEODES.

Orneodes, Latreille, Precis, p. 148 (1796) ; id. Hist. Nat. Crust.

Ins. iii. p. 418 (1802); xiv. p. 258 (1805); Treitschke,

Schmett. Eur. ix. (2) p. 254 (1833).
Alucita, pt. Linnaeus, Syst. Nat (ed. x.) i. p. 542 (1758);

Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 378 (1835), nec

Poda.



278 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

THE TWENTY-PLUME MOTH. ORNEODES HEXADACTYLA.

(Plate CLVIIL, Fig. 10.)

Alucita hexadactyla, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. x.) i. p. 542,
no - 35 ( J 758); id. Faun. Suec. p. 371, no. 1458 (1761);
Stephens, 111. Brit Ent. Haust iv. p. 378 (1835); Curtis,
Brit. Ent. xv. pi. 695 (1838) ; Kirby, Eur. Butterflies and
Moths, p. 415 (1883).

Alurita polydactyla, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. ix. fig. 28 (1803 ?) ;
Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 379 (1835).

Orneodes polydactylus, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (2), p. 257

(1833).

The Twenty-Plume Moth is found in Temperate and Southern
Europe and Asia Minor. It expands from half an inch to two-
thirds of an inch across the wings.

Each of the wings is divided into six plumes. When arranged
together, the fore-wings show a rusty-yellow ground, with twc
violet transverse bands, bordered with white. On the costal
area are five violet spots, two in front of the first band, one at
the commencement of the first band, a crescent-shaped spot
between the first and second bands, and lastly one which forms
the commencement of the second band. At the tips are small
dark dots on a light ground. The hind-wings are paler rusty-
yellow, with each of the six areas dotted with dark brown.

TORTRICES.

The Tortrices, or Bell Moths, are an extensive group of small
moths, with the fore-wings usually broad and truncated at the end,
and rounded hind-wings. The antennae are simple, the palpi
and fringes usually short, and the wings almost always entire.
The fore-wings are of bright or variegated colours, and the
hind-wings are almost always unicolorous white or brown.




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O. ErtyplLCuritj&s cc>rLgeU^ttMa^,

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TORTRIX. 279

When at rest the moths extend the fore-wings flat over the
hind- wings, which gives the insect somewhat of the shape of a
bell ; hence the name.

The larvae have sixteen legs, and many of them inhabit
rolled-up leaves (hence the name Tortrix], while others feed
on the seeds or roots of plants, and several infest fruit. The
Tortrices are often treated as forming one large compact family
(TortricidcR), but some authors have tried to divide them into
several. The few species which we have room to notice are
therefore noted under their genera, and the families to which
they have been referred are merely indicated.

GENUS TORTRIX. (Tortricida.)

Tortrix, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. x.) i. p. 530 (1758); Poda,
Mus. Grsec. p. 93 (1761); Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. viii.
p. 45 (1830).
The type of this genus is a very common and unmistakeable

British insect.

THE GREEN OAK-TORTRIX. TORTRIX VIRIDANA.
(Plate CLIV., Fig. I.)

Tortrix viridana, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. (ed. x.), i. p. 530, no.
203, (1758); id. Faun. Suec. p. 342, no. 1307 (1761);
Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. viii. p. 96 (1830) ; Stephens,
111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 68 (1834); Kirby, Eur. Butter-
flies and Moths, p. 412, pi. 61, figs. 18-18 b (1883).

The Green Oak Tortrix is found in Temperate and Southern
Europe. It expands three-quarters of an inch.

The fore- wings are bright light green, with thecosta narrowly
yellowish, and the fringes of the same colour. The hind-wings
and abdomen are grey. The head and palpi are yellowish.

The larva lives on oak and sallow. It is light green, orna-



280 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

mented with several black dots. The head is shining black,
and the neck light brown. On the ninth segment is a brown
spot.

The pupa is shining dark brown, almost black, with a divided
terminal point.

GENUS GAURIS. (Tortricida^
Gauris, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 374(1826?).
A pretty South American genus of Tortrices.

GAURIS CRAMERIANA.

(Plate CLIV., Fig. 2.)

Tortrix crameriana, Stoll in Cramer, Pap. Exot. iv. pi. 348,
figs. I, K (1781); Duncan, in Jardine's Nat. Libr. Exot.
Moths, p. 229, pi. 28, fig. 3. (1841).

This Moth is a native of Surinam, and measures about three-
quarters of an inch in expanse. The wings are brown, with
two oblique pale lines, the second broadly bordered on both
sides with black; the marginal area is reddish. The hind-
wings are lighter brown, and without markings.

GENUS ERNARMONIA. (Carpocapsidcs^}
Ernarmonia, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 375 (1826?).
Carpocapsa^ Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. vii. p. 231 (i829);viii.

p. 1 60 (1830).

The species belonging to this group were named Carpocapsa
by Treitschke, because their larvae feed in acorns, apples, plums,
&c.

THE JUMPING-BEAN TORTRIX. ERNARMONIA SALTITANS.

(Plate CLIV., Fig. 3 ; pupa, Fig. 4; infested bean, Fig. 5.)
Carpocapsa saltitans, West wood, Proc. Ent. Soc. Lond. (2) v.
p. 27 (1858).



RHACODIA. 28l

This curious insect is a native of Mexico. It expands three-
quarters of an inch.

The fore-wings are greyish-white, varied with ashy, with
numerous short oblique dashes on the costa. The apex is
black, with a small oval white mark. On the inner margin
near the base is a small, square, blackish mark, and a large,
conical ashy spot beyond it, striated and margined with black.
The hind-margin is variegated with leaden-grey and white, with
a row of small, double, black dots. The hind-wings are brown.
The head and collar are brownish ; the palpi dusky outside,
and whitish inside. The larva lives in the seeds of a plant
called " Calliguaja? and is very lively, the infested seeds
appearing to jump about of their own accord.

GENUS RHACODIA. (Peroneidce.)

Rhacodia, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 384 (1826?).
Teras, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. vii. p. 239 (1829) ; viii. p. 247
(1830).

A curious genus, remarkable for the irregular outline of the
costa of the fore-wings. The palpi are also rather longer than
usual in the Tortrices.

THE NOTCH-WING. RHACODIA CAUDANA.

(Plate CLIV., Fig. 6.)

Pyrahs caudana, Fabricius, Syst. Ent. p. 651, no. 38 (1775).
Tortrix effractana, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. vii. fig. 175 (1801).
Teras caudana, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. viii. p. 248 (1830), x.
(3), p. 128 (1835); Kirby, Eur. Butterflies and Moths,
p. 412, pi. 61, fig. 16 (1883).

This Moth is a native of England, France, Germany and
Russia. It expands about three-quarters of an inch.

The fore-wings are pale purplish-grey, varied with light brick-



282 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY

red. The costa has, as it were, a piece taken out of the middle,
and the tips are hooked. There are small brown and white
spots distinctly defined, and these give the wings a mottled
appearance, and sometimes the dark spots run into faint bands.
The borders of the wings are pale brick-red. The hind-wings
are uniform white, slightly dusted with reddish in parts.

This insect is very variable, but may always be recognised
by its peculiar shape. The green larva feeds on different kinds
of willow.

GENUS CHIMATOPHILA. (Chimatophilida)
Oporinia^ Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 387 (1826?);

Stephens, 111 Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 234(1834), nom.

pr&occ.
Cheimatophila, Stephens, op. cit. p. 172 (1834), Von Heinemann,

Schmett. Deutschl. (2) i. (i), p. 64 (1863).
Tortricodes, Guene'e, Ann. Soc. Ent. France (2) iii. p. 305 (1845).

A rather aberrant genus, with long and rather narrow wings,
and short palpi. The type is almost a cosmopolitan species.

THE CLOUDED WINTER TORTRIX.

CHIMATOFHILA TORTRICELLA.
(Plate CLIV., Fig. 7.)

Tinea tortrialla, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. viii. fig. n (1796 ?).
Diurnea nubilea, Haworth, Lepid. Brit. p. 503 (1812).
Tortrix hyemana, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. vii. fig. 267 (1814?).
Lemmatophila alternella, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i),

p. 39 (1832) ; id. x. (3), p. 154 (1835).
Oporinia nubilea^ Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 234

(1834)-

Oporinia tortricella, id. t.c. p. 234 (1834).
Lemmatophila hyemella, Treitschke, Schmett Eur. x. (3), p. 154

(i835).



EN YPH ANTES. 283

This species is a native of Central and Southern Europe. It
expands rather less than an inch.

The fore-wings are brownish-grey, varied with dark brown
and pale grey, with a dark central band, and another narrower
band nearer the base, which does not extend to the inner
margin. On the costa and at the apex are dark spots. Some-
times all the markings are indistinct. The hind -wings are light
brownish-grey.

It is found from October to April in woods.



GENUS ENYPHANTES.

Enyphantes, Hiibner, Tentamen, p. 2 (1810?).

Exapate, Hiibner, Verz. bek. Schmett. p. 387 (1826 ?) ; Stain-
ton, Ins. Brit. Tineina, p. 12 (1854); Von Heinemann,
Schmett. Deutschl. (2) i. (i), p. 65 (1863).

This genus, like the last, belongs to a Family of somewhat
doubtful position, but they are included by most recent authors
in the Tortrices, and not in the Tinea.

The tongue is absent, the antennae are ciliated in the male,
the spurs of the four hind tibiae are very short, and the fore-
wings of the female are very short and narrow, while the hind-
wings are absent.

THE AUTUMNAL DAGGER. ENYPHANTES CONGELATELLA.

(Plate CLIV. Fig. 8, male ; Fig. 9, female.}
Tinea congelatella, Clerck, Icones, pi. 8, fig. 5 (1759).
Tinea gelatella, Linnaeus, Faun. Suec. p. 370, no. 1450 (1761);

id. Syst. Nat. (ed. xii.), i. (2), p. 883, no. 344 (1767).
Tortrix gelatana, Hiibner, Eur. Schmett. viii. fig. 266

(1810?).

Lemmatophila gelatella, Treitschke, Schmett. Eur. ix. (i), p. 34
(1832) x. (3), p. 153 (1835).



284 LLOYD'S NATURAL HISTORY.

Cheimatophila gelatella, Curtis, Ent. Mag. i. p. 191 (1833).
Oxypate gelatella^ Stephens, 111. Brit. Ent. Haust. iv. p. 235

(1834).

Exapate gelatella, Stainton, Ins. Brit. Tineina, p. 12 (1852).
Exapate congelatella. Von Heinemann, Schmett. Deutschl.
(2) i. (i), p. 66 (1863).

This Moth is widely distributed in Europe. The male
expands nine lines and a half, but the female only expands
four lines.

The fore-wings are reddish ashy-grey, with a broad whitish
streak on the disc, in which are two dark brown spots, one
before, and the other beyond the middle. The apex is whitish,
and on the costa, near the apex,' is a dark brown spot. The
hind-wings are greyish-brown.

The fore-wings of the female are very short and narrow, ol
a whitish-grey, with brownish margins.

The larva feeds on privet, whitethorn, &c.



FAMILY

Antennae often pectinated, more or less thickened before
the tip, which tapers to a point ; proboscis generally long ;
palpi long, pointed, ascending ; abdomen long, and most fre-


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