W. L. (Waldo Lee) McAtee.

A sketch of the natural history of the District of Columbia together with an indexed edition of the U.S. Geological survey's 1917 map of Washington and vicinity online

. (page 4 of 13)
Online LibraryW. L. (Waldo Lee) McAteeA sketch of the natural history of the District of Columbia together with an indexed edition of the U.S. Geological survey's 1917 map of Washington and vicinity → online text (page 4 of 13)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Descriptions of new hymenoptera, 1.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 39, pp. 617-623, Feb. 25, 1911.

Winnemana argei, n. gen. et. sp. Plummers Id., Md.

Cu3hman, R. A.

A revision of Hymenopterous insects of the tribe Cremastini of
America north of Mexico.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 53, pp. 503-551, Aug. 22, 1917.

9 species from this vicinity, T new.

Gahan, A. B.

Aphidiinae of North America.

Bui. 152, Maryland Agr. Exp. Sta., Apr., 1911, pp. 147-200, figs. 1-11.

13 species.

Descriptions of 2 new genera and 6 new species of parasitic
hjnnenoptera.

Proc. Ent. Soc. Wash. 14, No. 1, Jan.-Mar., 1912, pp. 2-8.

4 new species, representing also 2 new genera.

A revision of the North American Ichneumon-flies of the sub-*
family Opiinae.

Proc. .U S. Nat. Mus., Vol. 49, pp. 63-95, Pis. 34-35, Aug. 23, 1915.

5 sp^ies from District of Columbia region.

Girault, A. A.

A systematic monograph of the Chalcidoid Hymenoptera of the
sub-family Signiphorinae.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 45, pp. 189-233, May 22, 1913.

4 species from District of Columbia.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



40 Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washington, 1918,

New miscellaneous Chalcidoid Hymenoptera with notes on de-
scribed species.
Ann. Ent. Soc. Am. 9, No. 3, Sept, 1916, pp. 291-308.

5 new species.

Descriptions of miscellaneous North American Chalcidoid Hymen-
optera of the family Eulophidae.
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 61, pp. 39-52, Oct. 16, 1916.

9 species, 8 new.

New species of parasitic hymenoptera.

Bui. Brooklyn Ent Soc. 11, No. 5, Dec., 1916, pp. 111-113.

7 new species.

Descriptions of miscellaneous chaicid-flies.

Ins. Insc. Mens. 4, Nos. 10-12, Jan. 12, 1917, pp. 109-12l7'

10 new species from the region of District of Columbia.

Isely, Dwight.

A synopsis of the petiolate wasps of the family Eumenidae (Hy-
menoptera) found in America north of Mexico.

Ann. Ent. Soc. Am. 10, No. 4, Dec., 1917, pp. 345-366.

2 species of Eumenes and two of Zethus.

Lovell, John H.
The bees of Virginia — Prosopis, Sphecodes, Osmia.
Ent. News XX, No. 10, Dec., 1909, pp. 412-417.

6 species of Prosopis, 1 new, 7 sp^ies of Sphecodes, and 6 species
of Osmia recorded from Falls Church, Great Falls and other locali-
ties in the vicinity of the District

Osten Sacken, C. R.

On the Cynipidae of the North American Oaks and their galls.

Proc. Ent Soc. Phila. I, pp. 47-72, Oct., 1861.

Describes 27 kinds of galls, with 25 scientific names of flies and
inquilines, 18 of them new.

Ueber die Gallen und andere durch Insecten Hervorgebrachte
Pflanzendeformationen in Nord-America.

. Entomologische Zeltung (Stettin) 22, No. 10-12, Oct.-Dec., 1861,
pp. 405-423.

Records, apparently, almost exclusively from the vicinity of Wash-
ington, the following galls: Cynipidae, 35, 3 described as new;
Cecidomyiidae, 34, 2 new; Hemiptera, 10, 2 new; Acarina, 3.

Additions and corrections to the paper entitled: "On the Cj^ipidae
of the North American Oaks and their Galls."

Proc. Ent. Soc. Phila. I, No. 8, Sept., 1862, pp. 241-259.

Notes on 15 galls additional to previous paper with 8 scientific
names, 4 new.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — McAtee 41

Contributions to the natural history of the Cynipidae of the
United States and of their galls.
Proc. Ent. Soc. Phila., Vol. II, pp. 33-49, April. 1863.

4 new species.

Contributions to the Natural History of the Cynipidae of the
United States and their Galls.
Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. Ill, pp. 54-64, Mar., 1870.

3 new species.

Rohwer, S. A.

New sawflies in the collections of the United States National
Museum.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 41, pp. 377-411, Oct. 14, 1911.

Records 8 species from this region, 2 of them being represented
by new varieties and 1 by a new subspecies.

Notes on sawflies with descriptions of new species.
Proc U. S. Nat. Mus. 43, pp. 205-251, Sept. 30, 1912.

10 species from this region, 9 new.

A synopsis and descriptions of the Nearctic species of sawflies of
the genus Xyela, with descriptions of other new species of sawflies.
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 45, pp. 265-281, May 22, 1913.
6 species from District of Columbia region, all new.

Descriptions of 2 new genera of parasitic hymenoptera.
Psyche 21, No. 2, April. 1914, pp. 79-81.
2 new genera and species.

Descriptions of new species of Hymenoptera.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., Vol. 49, pp. 205-249, July 16, 1915.

11 species of sawflies, 10 new, and 5 other new species from region
of District of Columbia.

Descriptions of 31 new species of Hymenoptera.
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 53, pp. 151-176, June 5, 1917.

5 new species from the District of Columbia regioa

Vlereck, H. L.

Descriptions of 6 new genera and 31 new species of Ichneumon-
flies.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 40, pp. 173-196, Apr. 17, 1911.

4 new species.

Descriptions of 1 new family, 8 new genera, and 33 new species
of Ichneumon flies.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 43, pp. 575-593, Dec. 31, 1912.

Myersiidae new family based on Myersia laminata, n. gen. et. sp.
and 2 other new species,' 1 representing a new genus.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



42 Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washington, 1918.
Descriptions of 10 new genera and 23 new species of Ichneumon-



Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 44, pp. 555-568, Apr. 18, 1913.

6 new species representing also 1 new genus and 1 new subgenus.

One new genus and 5 new species of Ichneumon-flies.
Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 29, pp. 165-171, Sept. 6. 1916.
All from vicinity of Washington.

OTHER INVERTEBRATES.

The work upon invertebrates, other than insects, of the
District of Columbia, that has been embodied in local lists,
has been upon 4 groups: the rotifers, the molluscs, the
spiders, and the daddy-long-legs or Phalangids. The list of
shells was published in 1855 and includes 90 species; the
spider list of 1893 enumerated 308 species; that relating to
the daddy-long-legs in 1904, 10 species; and the catalog of
rotifers or wheel-animalcules of 1913, 246 species.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.
Girard, Chas.

Catalogue of recent shells and other molluscs found in the District
of Columbia, prepared from specimens in the cabinet of Dr. E.
Foreman.

Proc. Nat. Institute, N. S., Vol. I, No. 2 (1855-6), pp. 78-82.

Read April 16, 1855; presented for publication June 11, 1855.

90 species enumerated.

Marx, Geo.

A list of the Araneae of the District of Columbia.

Proc. Ent. Soc. Wash., Vol. II (1891), 1893, pp. 149-162.

308 species recorded. It is noted that 62 undescribed species also
had been collected.

Banks, Nathan.
Phalangids in the District of Columbia.
Journ. N. Y. Ent. Soc. XII, No. 4, Dec, 1904, p. 256.
10 species listed.

Harring, Harry K.

A list of the rotatoria of Washington and vicinity, with descrip-
tions of a new genus and 10 new species.

Proc. U. S. National Museum, Vol. 46, pp. 387-405, Pis. 34-38,
Dec. 31, 1913.

246 species in all.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — McAtee 43

A reyision of the rotatorian genera Lepadella and Lophocharis
with descriptions of 5 new species.

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 51, pp. 527-568, Dec 21, 1916.
6 species from District of Columbia region, 1 new.

FISHES.

Although uninteresting to many students of natural his-
tory, fishes, in the region of the Distirict of Columbia have
received more attention than any group of vertebrates except
birds. Three principal lists Jiave been published and the
number of species recorded now stands at 94. At least 14
of these species are known to have been introduced into
the Potomac as food fishes ; this number includes the spotted
and forked-tail catfishes, carp, goldfish, tench, ide, two
species of crappie, at least one sunfish, the goggle-eye,
warmouth, the large-mouth and small-mouth black bass and
the wall-eyed pike.

The fact that tide-water ends in our vicinity makes the
distribution of fishes particularly interesting. The number
of true salt-water fishes that stiay far enough upstream to
be included in the District fauna is now placed at 14.
Among these fishes are a shark, the menhaden, an anchovy,
a Cyprinodon, the silvergar, the pipefish, pigfish, spot, whit-
ing, angel -fish, a goby, toadfish, sea-robin and sole.

Of the anadromons fishes or those which run up from salt
water to fresh to spawn, we have 5 ascending as far as
Little Falls, namely, two species of sturgeons, and 3 of
herrings, and 3 that keep on Great Falls, these being the
shad, striped bass and white perch. It is recorded ^^ also
that an Atlantic Salmon was caught in the Potomac about
June 10, 1885. In addition to these there is the lamprey
which runs into all sorts of small streams to spawn, and the
eel which spawns in salt water and after ascending the
river reaches almost all bodies of water, even those appar-
ently isolated. These fishes are of coastal affinities, but
we have one species definitely characteristic of the higher
western country, that being the brook trout, which has been
found in Difficult Run, Va.

"Wooldridge, J., Natural Advantages of the City of Washington, D. C,
1892, p. 38.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



44 Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washingtotij 1918.

The fishes thus far captured in this region belong to 32
families of which that most numerously represented by
species is the minnow family with 24. There are 12 species
of sunfishes and basses, 8 of perches and darters, 7 of cat-
fishes and 5 each of the sucker, and shad families. Twenty
families are represented by only one species each. Of the
species of fishes that have been described from this region
at least 3 are now recognized as good species and one as a
variety ; these are two minnows, Notropi8 hudsonius amarus
Girard, Notropis analostanus Girard, a silver-side, Menidia
heryllina Cope, and a darter Boleosoma effulgens Girard.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Smith, Hugh M., and Bean, Barton A.

List of Fishes known to inhabit the waters of the District of

Columbia and vicinity.

Bui. U. S. Fish Commission, 1898 (1899), pp. 179-187.

Lists 81 8i>ecies.
Bean, Barton A., and Weed, Alfred C.

Recent additions to the fish fauna of the District of Columbia.

Ptoc. Biol. Soc. Wash. XXIV, pp. 171-174, June 16, 1911.

Lists 12 species, 11 of them additional to previous list.
McAtee, W. L., and Weed, Alfred C.

Ff.rst list of the fishes of the vicinity of Plummers Island, Md.

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. XXVIII, pp. 1-14, Feb. 12, 1915.

Lists 54 species, 1 new to District list.
RadclifTe, Lewis, and Welsh, W. W.

A list of the fishes of the Seneca Creek, Montgomery County,

Maryland, region.

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 29, pp. 39-45, Feb. 24, 1916.

Annotated list of 41 species, none additional to District list.

BATRACHIANS AND REPTILES.

Though these two groups are not closely related, custom-
arily they are treated together, a procedure followed in the
list by Dr. W. P. Hay the only report on these forms for
the region of the District of Columbia. The batrachians
inhabiting this vicinity comprise 14 species of salamanders,
3 toads, and 10 frogs, and the reptiles include 4 lizards, 21
snakes and 11 turtles. This tabulation includes two more
batrachians than are listed by Dr. Hay, namely: Fowler's



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — McAtee 45

toad, a species more perfectly understood now than then,
and the spotted salamander. Three turtles also have been
added, one of which, the northern wood tortoise (Clemmys
insculpta)y has been collected several times near Plummers
Island, Md. The name of one snake is removed, the form
being Natrix hisecta of Cope, which as Dr. Hay states was
founded on an abnormal and unique specimen. This type
specimen was collected in Washington, and the material
upon which a species of tree frog, Hyla evittata, was de-
scribed by Gerrit S. Miller was obtained nearby at Four-mile
Run, Va.

Only two of the species of snakes reported are venomous,
namely : the copperhead and the rattlesnake. The former is
common, but the latter apparently is extinct. Warden
recorded" it in 1816. The species here verging on their
northern limit are the mud eel (tiiren lacertina), Holbrookes
salamander (Spelerpes guttolineatus), the brown-back lizard
(Lygosoma laterale), the six-lined lizard (Cnemidophorus
sexlineatus), the spotted racer (Callopettis guttatus), scar-
let snake (Cemophora coccinea), and the keeled green snake
(Cyclophis aestivus). Species venturing little beyond the
Piedmont Plateau are the long-tailed triton (Spelerpes
Umgicaudus) , brown triton (Desmognathus fusca), and the
Allegheny blacksnake (Callopeltis ohsoletu^), while the dia-
mond back terrapin (Malaclemmys centrata) and the two
turtles mentioned in the last item of the following bibliog-
raphy belong to the coastal plain fauna. Whether the north-
ern wood-tortoise (Clemmys insculpta) and the Jefferson
Salamander (Amhy stoma jeffersonianum fuscum) should also
be considered as highland species or whether they exist here
merely on the southern fringe of a more general range is
uncertain.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.
Fisher, A. K.

Spelerpes guttolineatus Holbrook, in the vicinity of Washington,
D. C.

Am. Nat. 21, No. 7, July, 1887, p. 672.

This and 4 other species captured near Munson Hill, Va.

"Warden, D. B.— A chorographical and statistical description of the
District of Columbia, 1816, p. 13.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



46 Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washington, 1918.

Miller, Gerrit S., Jr.
A new tree frog from the District of Columbia.
Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 13, pp. 75-78, Sept. 28. 1899.
Hyla evittata, n. sp.. Four-mile Run, Va.

Hay, W. P.

A list of the batrachians and reptiles of the District of Columbia
and vicinity.

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. XV, pp. 121-145, figs. 1-3, June 20, 1902.

Lists 56 species of which 1 Is invalid and 3 are without definite
records.

Stejneger, Leonhard.

A salamander new to the District of Columbia.

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 15, pp. 289-240, Dec. 16, 1902.

Amhystona maculatum (punctatum)^ a species now known to be
fairly common and widely distributed.

A snake new to the District of Columbia.

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 18, pp. 73-74, Feb. 21, 1905.

Cemophora coccinea, Anacostla.

Henshaw, H. W.
An extension of the range of the wood tortoise.
Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. XX, p. 65, June 12, 1907.
Taken Aug. 19, 1906, near Plummers Island, Md.

Allard, H. A.
Fowler's Toad (Bufo fowlerl Putnam).
Science N. S. XXVI, Sept. 20, 1907, pp. 383-384.
Records this species from Washington, D. C.

Dunn, E. R.

A preliminary list of the reptiles and amphibians of Virginia.

Copela, No. 53, Jan. 25, 1918, pp. 16-27.

Records 21 species of reptiles and 16 amphibians from Alexandria
County, and 25 and 22, respectively, from Fairfax. Two species of
turtles, Pseudemys condnna and Graptemys pseudogeographica are
additional to those recorded In previous publications.

BIRDS.

Some of the earlier references to the birds of the region
are of interest. We are informed ^^ that one of the Indian
names for the Potomac was Cohonguroton or river of swans.

^Keirn, DeB. Randolph. Keim's Illustrated Handbook. Washington
and its Environs, 1874, p. 39.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — McAtee 47

It is said,^*^ however, that Occoquan was the farthest up
river feeding place of the swans ; but flocks of as many as 300
were seen there and of two kinds, both trumpeter and
whooper. There is no later record of the trumpeter swan,
however, and the whooper in modern books is called whistling
swan to distinguish it from the European bird.

The Potomac was a noted resort for the ca^vasback duck,
the favorite ground for the species extending from Analostan
Island to Craney Island 25 miles below. It is said that
myriads of them were present, fairly covering the stream.^^
As if in prophecy one author (Elliot) deprecates the shoot-
ing with large guns, especially at night. As we now know,
it is due to this and similar practices that such large
gatherings of these splendid birds are things of the past.

Evidently it was not necessary in those early days for
hunters to journey far from the city. In 1797, Francis Baily
remarks : ^^

"Game is plenty in these parts, and, what perhaps may
appear to you i^emarkable, I saw some boys who were out a
shooting, actually kill several brace of partridges in what
will be one of the most public streets of the city." "In 1836
a flock of 30 to 40 wild turkeys flew over Georgetown going
toward Chain Bridge and a man on the bridge killed 9 of
them." 2»

In the Proceedings of the National Institute for the Pro-
motion of Science are various interesting notes relating to
the birds of the District. The donations announced at the
meeting of September 12, 1842, especially are noteworthy,^^
Four specimens of Leach's petrel, one of Wilson's petrel,
and one Audubon shearwater were presented. The birds
were taken the preceding month, August, 1842, and the
records in each case are the first for the District. This



« Eliot, Jonathan. Historical Sketches of the Ten Miles Square form-
ing the District of Columbia, etc., 1830, p. 431.

"Hall, Basil Travels in North America in the Years 1827 and 1828.
Edinburgh, 1829, Vol. Ill, p. 68.

"Journal of a tour in Unsettled Parts of North America in 179$ and
1797, London 1856, p. 128.

•Nile's Weekly Register, 51, 128, October 22, 1836.

«• Third Bulletin of the Proceedings of the National Institute for the Pro-
motion of Science. Feb.. 1842, to Feb., 1845, p. 251.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



48 Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washington, 1918.

incursion of maritime species is undoubtedly that referred
to by Haley, who says "during a violent easterly storm a
few years ago, the Potomac was covered with multitudes of
Mother Gary's chickens (Thalassidroma leachii) which had
been forced out of their usual course by the gale.'*

In the bulletin of the National Institute also are earlier
records (all in 1842 and 1843) for the surf scoter (Second
BuL, p. 148), the double-crested cormorant, old squaw
(Third Bui., p. 262), snow bunting (Third BuL, p. 224), and
yellow rail (Third Bui., p. 320) than are cited in later pub-
lications, and the only record for the ivory gull (Second
BuL, p. 134).

Of birds which once frequented the District but which now
are gone we may mention : the passenger pigeon, now wholly
extinct, the sandhill crane, Carolina parakeet, and prairie
chicken.'^ The wild turkey and the ruffed grouse no longer
find congenial haunts within the District, but occur spar-
ingly in some of the wildest adjoining territory. Practically
the same is true of the pileated woodpecker, although this
species being of a more roving disposition may, occasionally,
be detected within our limits. The wood duck, once a
breeder within the District, now nests only in the more
secluded parts of nearby stream valleys, but still occurs
within the District during migration. These species have
been driven away, either by direct persecution by man, or
by the destruction of habitats essential to their welfare.
Another bird, the black-throated bunting or dick-cissel, has
departed for reasons of its own. Much territory here is
suited to its needs, but the bird has withdrawn from much
of its former eastern range, including the District of Colum-
bia. On the other hand, certain species have become more
common in recent years. Among them we may mention the
crow blackbird, orchard oriole, Cape-May warbler, butcher-
bird, robin, and the mockingbird. To replace the lost black-
throated bunting another finch, Bachman's sparrow, is
gradually occupying this region as a breeding home. The

"Washington Described, 1861, p. 27.

»In the National Museum is a specimen of prairie chicken that was
taken in the Custls Spring marsh March 13, 1885. This isolated occurrence
is rather mysterious.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — McAtee 49

starling, a new-comer, sometimes abundant in winter, has
also begun to nest in small numbers.

The English sparrow was introduced into Washington in
1871. The following contemporaneous account of the matter
may not be entirely pleasing to those who have had dis-
agreeable experience with this hardy little stranger. "A
flock of imported sparrows was set at liberty in the public
grounds in 1871, for the destruction of insects. Each year
new cages are placed in the trees for the accommodation of
their increased numbers. These useful birds are fed regu-
larly every morning during the winter in Franklin, Lafay-
ette and other squares." '^

The first list of birds of the District of Columbia, that has
so far come to light was published by David Baillie Warden
in 1816. (See bibliography below.) It contained 32 species, '
among them the passenger pigeon, now extinct, and the
snowy owl, a rare bird here.

The beginning of the modem series of lists is that of
Goues and Prentiss of 1861. It contains 225 species. Jouy
increased this to 230 in 1875, and to 240 in 1877. The second
edition of Goues and Prentiss's work in 1883 contained 248
species. No other list appeared during the next 15 years,
in which period a number of additions to the District
avifauna were noted, the total number of species reaching
284 (See bibliography) as recorded by Eichmond in 1898.
This number is increased by one in Gooke's list of 1908, which
omits one living species listed by Richmond, the true total,
therefore, being 286. The introduced starling (Sturnus
vulgaris) f^which has been seen in numbers in and about the
District since 1913 (a number breeding in 1917), is a species
not included in any of the published lists. The European
skylark and white-rumped sandpiper also have been recently
observed. As noted in previous pages, the ivory gull,
trumpeter swan, and white ibis are additional species which
have been recorded as visitants to this region but for which
there are no definite records.

»Keiin's lUustrated Handbook. Washington, etc., 1874, p. 39.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



\



50 ' Bulletin 1, Biological Society of Washington, 1918.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.
Warden, David Baillie.

[Birds seen in the District of Ck>lumbia.]

A chorographical and statistical description of the District of
Columbia* Paris, 1816, pp. 210-211.

32 species.

Goues, Blliott, and Prentiss, D. Webster.

List of birds ascertained to inhabit the District of Columbia, with
the times of arrival and departure of such as are non-residents, and
brief notices of habits, etc.

Sixteenth Ann. Rep. Smiths. Inst., 1861 (1862), pp. 399-421.

226 species listed, 1 erroneously.

Burroughs, John.

Spring in Washington, with an eye to the birds.

AUantic Monthly, Vol. XXIII, May, 1869, pp. 580-591.

Reprinted in Wake Robin, Cambridge, 1895, pp. 127-156.

Notes on flowers; birds; crow roosts; orchard oriole breeding in
Capitol grounds; other birds there; black-throated bunting; red-
headed the most common woodpecker, more common than the robin;
and summer yellow-bird more common in town than out.

Shufeldt, R. W.

Birds of the District of Columbia.

Field and Forest, Vol. I, Nos. 8-9, Jan.-Feb., 1876, pp. 79-80.

A list of 38 common permanent residents and 29 common winter
residents, the latter including Ectopistes migratorius. Six other
species are mentioned.

Jouy, Pierre Louis.

Catalogue of the Birds of the District of Columbia.

Field and Forest, Vol. II, No. 9, Mar., 1877, pp. 154-156; No. 10.
Apr., 1877, pp. 178-181.

240 species in all. Mr. Jouy read a list of 230 species of birds at
a meeting of Potomac-side Naturalists Club, Nov. 15, 1875.

Coues, E. and Prentiss, D. Webster.

Remarks on Birds of the District of Columbia.

Field and Forest, Vol. II, No. 11, May, 1877, pp. 191-193.

Comment on Jouy's Catalogue, with which these remarks were
also separately published, Washington, D. C, 1877, pp. 1-11.

Jouy, Pierre Louis.
Field Notes on some of the Birds of the District of Columbia.
Field and Forest, Vol. Ill, No. 3, Sept., 1877, pp. 51-52.
Notes on 6 species, one, the lark sparrow, an addition to the list.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Natural History of District of Columbia — MeAtee 51

Roberts, W. F.
Additions to the List of District Birds.
Field and Forest, Vol. Ill, Nos. 10-12, Apr.-June, 1878, p. 172.
Macrorhamphus griseus. Total now, 242.

Coues, Elliott, and Prentiss, D. Webster.

Avifauna Columbiana; being a list of birds ascertained to inhabit
the District of Columbia, with the times of arrival and departure
of such as are non-residents, and brief notices of habits, etc.

The second edition revised to date and entirely rewritten.

Bui. No. 26, U. S. Nat. Mus., 1883, 133 pp., 4 maps, 100 figs.

Lists 248 species; describes various parts of the Washington


1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Online LibraryW. L. (Waldo Lee) McAteeA sketch of the natural history of the District of Columbia together with an indexed edition of the U.S. Geological survey's 1917 map of Washington and vicinity → online text (page 4 of 13)