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^UDDIGORE



RUDDIGORE



Uniform edition. With Special Decorated Cover,
and & full-page Colour-Plates by W. RUSSELL
FLINT. Price $s. 6</. net each.

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

PATIENCE

IOLANTHE

PRINCESS IDA

THE MIKADO

RUDDIGORE

THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

THE GONDOLIERS



OVER THE RIPENING PEACH

BUZZES THE BEE.
SPLASH ON THE BILLOWY BEACH

TUMBLES THE SEA"
(p. 129)



THE GEORGE E. LASK COLLECTION



RUDDIGORE

OR

THE WITCH'S CURSE

BY

W. S. GILBERT

WITH COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS BY

W. RUSSELL FLINT




LONDON

G. BELL AND SONS, LTD.

1912



CHISWICK PRESS : CHARLES WHITTINGHAM AND CO.
TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE, LONDON,



LIST OF COLOUR PLATES

TO FACE
PAGE

" OVER THE RIPENING PEACH

BUZZES THE BEE.
SPLASH ON THE BILLOWY BEACH
TUMBLES THE SEA " . . Frontispiece

"ALAS, DICK, I LOVE ROSE MAYBUD, AND LOVE
IN VAIN! " 120

ENTER ROSE HE is MUCH STRUCK BY HER . 124

" POOR CHILDREN, HOW THEY LOATHE ME" . -134

" DENY THE FALSEHOOD, ROBIN, AS YOU SHOULD,
IT is A PLOT!" 140

ENTER ROBIN AND ADAM MELODRAMATICALLY . 144

GHOSTS MAKE PASSES ROBIN BEGINS TO WRITHE
IN AGONY 152

" WHAT is THE MATTER? HAVE YOU CARRIED

HER OFF?" 1 60



2013897



First Produced at the Savoy Theatre, London, by Mr. R. D'Oyly
Carte, on Saturday, zznd January, 1887.



DRAMATIS PERSONAE



f MR. DURWARD LELY



SIR DESPARD MURGATROYD , ...

MR. RUTLAND BARRINGTON



MORTALS

ROBIN OAKAPPLE (A Young Farmer) ..... MR. GEORGE GROSSMITH
RICHARD DAUNTLESS

(His Foster-Brother A Man-o' -war's man)

(Of RuddigoreA Wicked Baronet) J

OLD ADAM GOODHEART (Robin's Faithful Servant) . MR. RUDOLPH LEWIS
ROSE MAYBUD (A Village Maiden) ...... Miss LEONORA BRAHAM

MAD MARGARET ............ Miss JESSIE BOND

DAME HANNAH (Rose's Aunt) ....... Miss ROSINA BRANDRAM

ZORAH \ f Miss JOSEPHINE FINDLAY

\MlSSLlNDSAY



GHOSTS

SIR RUPERT MURGATROYD (The First Baronet) .... MR. PRICE

SIR JASPER MURGATROYD (The Third Baronet) .... MR. CHARLES

SIR LIONEL MURGATROYD ( The Sixth Baronet) .... MR. TREVOR

SIR CONRAD MURGATROYD (The Twelfth Baronet) . . . MR. BURBANK

SIR DESMOND MURGATROYD (The Sixteenth Baronet) . . MR. TUER

SIR GILBERT MURGATROYD (The Eighteenth Baronet) . . MR. WILBRAHAM

SIR MERVYN MURGATROYD (The Twentieth Baronet) . . MR. Cox

AND

SIR RODERIC MURGATROYD (The Twenty-first Baronet) . MR. RICHARD TEMPLE

CHORUS OF OFFICERS, ANCESTORS, AND PROFESSIONAL BRIDESMAIDS

ACT I . . The Fishing Village of Rederring, in Cornwall
ACT II . . Picture Gallery in Ruddigore Castle

TIME. Early in the XlXth Century



RUDDIGORE

OR

THE WITCH'S CURSE
ACT I

SCENE. The fishing milage of Rederring (in Cornwall). ROSE
MAYBUD'S cottage is seen L.

Enter Chorus of Bridesmaids. They range themselves in front
of ROSE'S cottage

CHORUS OF BRIDESMAIDS
Fair is Rose as the bright May-day ;

Soft is Rose as the warm west-wind ;
Sweet is Rose as the new-mown hay
Rose is the queen of maiden-kind!
Rose, all glowing

With virgin blushes, say
Is anybody going

To marry you to-day?

SOLO

Zorah. Every day, as the days roll on,

Bridesmaids' garb we gaily don,
Sure that a maid so fairly famed
Won't very long remain unclaimed.



ii2 RUDDIGORE

Hour by hour and day by day

Several months have passed away,

And though she 's the fairest flower that blows,

Nobody yet has married Rose!

CHORUS
Rose, all glowing

With virgin blushes, say
Is anybody going

To marry you to-day?

Enter OLD HANNAH, from cottage

Han. Nay, gentle maidens, you sing well but vainly, for Rose is
still heart-free, and looks but coldly upon her many suitors.

Zor. It 's very disappointing. Every young man in the village is
in love with her, but they are appalled by her beauty and
modesty, and won't declare themselves ; so, until she makes
her own choice, there 's no chance for anybody else.

Ruth. This is, perhaps, the only village in the world that possesses
an endowed corps of professional bridesmaids who are bound
to be on duty every day from ten to four and it is at least six
months since our services were required. The pious charity
by which we exist is practically wasted !

Zor. We shall be disendowed that will be the end of it! Dame
Hannah you're a nice old person ^/ow could marry if you
liked. There 's old Adam Robin's faithful servant he loves
you with all the frenzy of a boy of fourteen.

Han. Nay that may never be, for I am pledged !

All. To whom?

Han. To an eternal maidenhood ! Many years ago I was betrothed
to a god-like youth who woo'd me under an assumed name.
But on the very day upon which our wedding was to have been
celebrated, I discovered that he was no other than Sir Roderic
Murgatroyd, one of the bad Baronets of Ruddigore, and the
uncle of the man who now bears that title. As a son of that
accursed race he was no husband for an honest girl, so, madly
as I loved him, I left him then and there. He died but ten
years since, but I never saw him again.



RUDDIGORE 113

Zor. But why should you not marry a bad Baronet of Ruddigore?

Ruth. All baronets are bad ; but was he worse than other baronets?

Han. My child, he was accursed.

Zor. But who cursed him? Not you, I trust!

Han. The curse is on all his line and has been, ever since the time

of Sir Rupert, the first Baronet. Listen, and you shall hear

the legend.

LEGEND
Han. Sir Rupert Murgatroyd

His leisure and his riches
He ruthlessly employed

In persecuting witches.
With fear he'd make them quake
He'd duck them in his lake
He'd break their bones
With sticks and stones,
And burn them at the stake !

CHORUS

This sport he much enjoyed,
Did Rupert Murgatroyd

No sense of shame

Or pity came
To Rupert Murgatroyd!

Han. Once, on the village green,

A palsied hag he roasted,
And what took place, I ween,

Shook his composure boasted,
For, as the torture grim
Seized on each withered limb,
The writhing dame
'Mid fire and flame
Yelled forth this curse on him :

" Each lord of Ruddigore,

Despite his best endeavour,
Shall do one crime, or more,
Once, every day, for ever!
ii Q



n 4 RUDDIGORE

This doom he can't defy,
However he may try,
For should he stay
His hand, that day
In torture he shall die!"



The prophecy came true :

Each heir who held the title
Had, every day, to do

Some crime of import vital ;
Until, with guilt o'erplied,
" I'll sin no more! " he cried,
And on the day
He said that say,
In agony he died!



CHORUS

And thus, with sinning cloyed,
Has died each Murgatroyd,
And so shall fall,
Both one and all.
Each coming Murgatroyd!

[Exeunt Chorus of Bridesmaids.



Enter ROSE MAYBUD/TWW cottage, -with small basket
on her arm

Han. Whither away, dear Rose? On some errand of charity, as
is thy wont?

Rose. A few gifts, dear aunt, for deserving villagers. Lo, here is
some peppermint rock for old gaffer Gadderby, a set of false
teeth for pretty little Ruth Rowbottom, and a pound of snuff
for the poor orphan girl on the hill.

Han. Ah, Rose, pity that so much goodness should not help to
make some gallant youth happy for life ! Rose, why dost thou
harden that little heart of thine? Is there none hereaway whom
thou couldst love?



RUDDIGORE 115

Rose. And if there were such an one, verily it would ill become
me to tell him so.

Han. Nay, dear one, where true love is, there is little need of prim
formality.

Rose. Hush, dear aunt, for thy words pain me sorely. Hung in a
plated dish-cover to the knocker of the workhouse door, with
naught that I could call mine own, save a change of baby-linen
and a book of etiquette, little wonder if I have always regarded
that work as a voice from a parent's tomb. This hallowed
volume [producing a book of etiquette^ composed, if I may
believe the title-page, by no less an authority than the wife of
a Lord Mayor, has been, through life, my guide and monitor.
By its solemn precepts I have learnt to test the moral worth of
all who approach me. The man who bites his bread, or eats
peas with a knife, I look upon as a lost creature, and he who
has not acquired the proper way of entering and leaving a
room is the object of my pitying horror. There are those in
this village who bite their nails, dear aunt, and nearly all are
wont to use their pocket combs in public places. In truth I
could pursue this painful theme much further, but behold, I
have said enough.

Han. But is there not one among them who is faultless, in thine
eyes? For example young Robin. He combines the manners
of a Marquis with the morals of a Methodist. Couldst thou not
love him?

Rose. And even if I could, how should I confess it unto him? For
lo, he is shy, and sayeth naught!



BALLAD
Rose. If somebody there chanced to be

Who loved me in a manner true,
My heart would point him out to me,
And I would point him out to you.
[Referring- to book.] But here it says of those who point,
Their manners must be out of joint
You may not point
You must not point
It's manners out of joint, to point!



RUDDIGORE

Had I the love of such as he,

Some quiet spot he'd take me to,
Then he could whisper it to me,

And I could whisper it to you.

[Referring to book.] But whispering, I've somewhere met,
Is contrary to etiquette:

Where can it be? [Searching book.
Now let me see [Finding reference.

Yes, Yes!
It's contrary to etiquette!

[Showing it to HANNAH.

If any well-bred youth I knew,

Polite and gentle, neat and trim,
Then I would hint as much to you,

And you could hint as much to him.
[Referring to book.} But here it says, in plainest print,
" It's most unladylike to hint"
You may not hint,
You must not hint
It says you mustn't hint, in print!

And if I loved him through and through

(True love and not a passing whim),
Then I could speak of it to you,

And you could speak of it to him.
But here I find it doesn't do

To speak until you're spoken to.

[Referring to book.] Where can it be? [Searching book.

Now let me see [Finding reference.
1 ' Don't speak until you're spoken to" !

[Exit HANNAH.

Rose. Poor Aunt ! Little did the good soul think, when she breathed
the hallowed name of Robin, that he would do even as well as
another. But he resembleth all the youths in this village, in
that he is unduly bashful in my presence, and lo, it is hard to
bring him to the point. But soft, he is here!



RUDDIGORE 117

ROSE is about to go when ROBIN enters and calls her

Robin. Mistress Rose!

Rose. {Surprised.} Master Robin!

Rob. I wished to say that it is fine.

Rose. It is passing fine.

Rob. But we do want rain.

Rose. Aye, sorely! Is that all?

Rob. [Sighing.] That is all.

Rose. Good day, Master Robin !

Rob. Good day, Mistress Rose! [Both going both stop.

(Rose. I crave pardon, I

\Rob. I beg pardon, I

Rose. You were about to say?

Rob. I would fain consult you

Rose. Truly?

Rob. It is about a friend.

Rose. In truth I have a friend myself.

Rob. Indeed? I mean, of course

Rose. And I would fain consult you

Rob. [Anxiously.] About him?

Rose. [Prudishly.] About her.

Rob. [Relieved '.] Let us consult one another.

DUET

Rob. I know a youth who loves a little maid

(Hey, but his face is a sight for to see !)
Silent is he, for he 's modest and afraid

(Hey, but he 's timid as a youth can be!)
Rose. I know a maid who loves a gallant youth

(Hey, but she sickens as the days go by !)
She cannot tell him all the sad, sad truth

(Hey, but I think that little maid will die!)
Rob. Poor little man !

Rose. Poor little maid!

Rob. Poor little man !

Rose. Poor little maid!

Both. Now tell me pray, and tell me true,

What in the world should the /y un g man j do

tmaiden



ii8 RUDDIGORE

Rob. He cannot eat and he cannot sleep

(Hey, but his face is a sight for to see!)
Daily he goes for to wail for to weep

(Hey, but he 's wretched as a youth can be !)
Rose. She 's very thin and she's very pale

(Hey, but she sickens as the days go by !)
Daily she goes for to weep for to wail

(Hey, but I think that little maid will die!)
Rob. Poor little maid!

Rose. Poor little man!

Rob. Poor little maid!

Rose. Poor little man !

Both. Now tell me pray, and tell me true,

What in the world should the (y un g man \ do?

^maiden



Rose. If I were the youth I should offer her my name

(Hey, but her face is a sight for to see!)
Rob. If I were the maid I should feed his honest flame

(Hey, but he 's bashful as a youth can be!)
Rose. If I were the youth I should speak to her to-day

(Hey, but she sickens as the days go by!)
Rob. If I were the maid I should meet the lad half way

(For I really do believe that timid youth will die!)
Rose. Poor little man!

Rob. Poor little maid !

Rose. Poor little man!

Rob. Poor little maid!

Both. I thank you, \ 1SS > L for your counsel true ;

Isir, J



I'll tell that what ( h ] ought to do!

Imaid J IsheJ



[Exit ROSE.



Rob. Poor child! I sometimes think that if she wasn't quite so
particular I might venture but no, no even then I should be
unworthy of her!



RUDDIGORE 119

He sits desponding. Enter OLD ADAM

Adam. My kind master is sad! Dear Sir Ruthven Murgatroyd

Rob. Hush ! As you love me, breathe not that hated name. Twenty
years ago, in horror at the prospect of inheriting that hideous
title and, with it, the ban that compels all who succeed to the
baronetcy to commit at least one deadly crime per day, for life,
I fled my home, and concealed myself in this innocent village
under the name of Robin Oakapple. My younger brother,
Despard, believing me to be dead, succeeded to the title and
its attendant curse. For twenty years I have been dead and
buried. Don't dig me up now.

Adam. Dear master, it shall be as you wish, for have I not sworn
to obey you for ever in all things? Yet, as we are here alone,
and as I belong to that particular description of good old man
to whom the truth is a refreshing novelty, let me call you by
your own right title once more! [ ROBIN assents. \ Sir Ruthven
Murgatroyd! Baronet! Of Ruddigore! Whew! It 's like eight
hours at the sea-side!

Rob. My poor old friend! Would there were more like you!

Adam. Would there were indeed! But I bring you good tidings.
Your foster-brother, Richard, has returned from sea his ship
the Tom-Tit rides yonder at anchor, and he himself is even
now in this very village!

Rob. My beloved foster-brother? No, no it cannot be!

Adam. It is even so and see, he comes this way!

Enter Chorus of Bridesmaids
CHORUS

From the briny sea
Comes young Richard, all victorious!

Valorous is he

His achievements all are glorious!
Let the welkin ring
With the news we bring

Sing it shout it

Tell about it
Safe and sound returneth he,
All victorious from the sea!



120 RUDDIGORE



Enter RICHARD. The girls welcome him as he greets
old acquaintances

BALLAD RICHARD

I shipped, d'ye see, in a Revenue sloop,
And, off Cape Finistere,

A merchantman we see,
A Frenchman, going free,
So we made for the bold Mounseer,

D'ye see?

We made for the bold Mounseer.

But she proved to be a Frigate and she up with her ports,
And fires with a thirty-two!
It come uncommon near,
But we answered with a cheer,
Which paralysed the Parly-voo,

D'ye see?
Which paralysed the Parly-voo!

Then our Captain he up and he says, says he,
" That chap we need not fear,
We can take her, if we like,
She is sartin for to strike,
For she 's only a darned Mounseer,

D'ye see?

She 's only a darned Mounseer!

But to fight a French fal-lal! it's like hittin' of a gal
It 's a lubberly thing for to do ;
For we, with all our faults,
Why we're sturdy British salts,
While she 's only a Parley-voo,

D'ye see?
A miserable Parley-voo!"

So we up with our helm, and we scuds before the breeze
As we gives a compassionating cheer;
Froggee answers with a shout
As he sees us go about,



"ALAS, DICK, I LOVE ROSE MAYBUD, AND LOVE IN VAIN!"

(P. 121)



RUDDIGORE 121

Which was grateful of the poor Mounseer,

D'ye see?

Which was grateful of the poor Mounseer!
And I'll wager in their joy they kissed each other's cheek
(Which is what them furriners do),
And they blessed their lucky stars
We were hardy British tars
Who had pity on a poor Parley-voo,

D'ye see?
Who had pity on a poor Parley-voo !

[Exeunt CHORUS, as ROBIN comes forward.

Rob. Richard!

Rich. Robin!

Rob. My beloved foster-brother, and very dearest friend, welcome
home again after ten long years at sea! It is such deeds as you
have just described that cause our flag to be loved and dreaded
throughout the civilized world!

Rich. Why, lord love ye, Rob, that 's but a trifle to what we have
done in the way of sparing life! I believe I may say, without
exaggeration, that the marciful little Tom-Tit has spared more
French frigates than any craft afloat! But 'taint fora British
seaman to brag, so I'll just stow my jawin' tackle and belay.
[ROBIN sighs.] But Vast heavin', messmate, what's brought
you all a-cockbill?

Rob. Alas, Dick, I love Rose Maybud, and love in vain !

Rich. You love in vain? Come, that's too good! Why, you're a
fine strapping muscular young fellow tall and strong as a to'-
gall'n-m'st taut as a fore-stay aye, and a barrowknight to
boot, if all had their rights!

Rob. Hush, Richard not a word about my true rank, which none
here suspect. Yes, I know well enough that few men are better
calculated to win a woman's heart than I. I'm a fine fellow,
Dick, and worthy any woman's love happy the girl who gets
me, say I. But I'm timid, Dick; shy nervous modest
retiring diffident and I cannot tell her, Dick, I cannot tell
her! Ah, you've no idea what a poor opinion I have of myself,
and how little I deserve it.
II R



122 RUDDIGORE

Rich. Robin, do you call to mind how, years ago, we swore that,
come what might, we would always act upon our hearts' dictates?

Rob. Aye, Dick, and I've always kept that oath. In doubt,
difficulty, and danger, I've always asked my heart what I should
do, and it has never failed me.

Rich. Right! Let your heart be your compass, with a clear con-
science for your binnacle light, and you'll sail ten knots on a
bowline, clear of shoals, rocks, and quicksands! Well now,
what does my heart say in this here difficult situation? Why,
it says " Dick," it says (it calls me " Dick" acos it 's known
me from a babby) " Dick," it says, "you ain't s\\yyou ain't
modest speak you up for him as is! " Robin, my lad, just you
lay me alongside, and when she 's becalmed under my lee, I'll
spin her a yarn that shall sarve to fish you two together for life !

Rob. Will you do this thing for me? Can you, do you think? Yes.
[Feeling his pulse. ] There 's no false modesty about you. Your
what I would call bumptious self-assertiveness (I mean the
expression in its complimentary sense) has already made you
a bos'n's mate, and it will make an admiral of you in time, if
you work it properly, you dear, incompetent old impostor! My
dear fellow, I'd give my right arm for one tenth of your modest
assurance.

SONG
Rob. My boy, you may take it from me,

That of all the afflictions accurst
With which a man 's saddled
And hampered and addled,
A diffident nature 's the worst.
Though clever as clever can be
A Crichton of early romance
You must stir it and stump it,
And blow your own trumpet,
Or, trust me, you haven't a chance.

If you wish in the world to advance,
Your merits you're bound to enhance,

You must stir and stump it,

And blow your own trumpet,
Or, trust me, you haven't a chance!



RUDDIGORE 123

Now take, for example, my case:

I've a bright intellectual brain

In all London city

There 's no one so witty
I've thought so again and again.
I've a highly intelligent face

My features can not be denied

But, whatever I try, sir,

I fail in and why, sir?
I'm modesty personified!

If you wish in the world to advance, etc.

As a poet, I'm tender and quaint

I've passion and fervour and grace
From Ovid and Horace
To Swinburne and Morris,
They all of them take a back place.
Then I sing and I play and I paint:
Though none are accomplished as I,
To say so were treason :
You ask me the reason?
I'm diffident, modest and shy!

If you wish in the world to advance, etc.

[Exit ROBIN.

Rich. [Looking after him.] Ah, it's a thousand pities he's such a
poor opinion of himself, for a finer fellow don't walk! Well,
I'll do my best for him. " Plead for him as though it was for
your own father " that 's what my heart 's a remarkin' to me
just now. But here she comes! Steady! Steady it is! [Enter
ROSE he is much struck by her.] By the Port Admiral but
she 's a tight little craft! Come, come, she 's not for you, Dick,
and yet she 's fit to marry Lord Nelson ! By the Flag of Old
England, I can't look at her unmoved.

Rose. Sir, you are agitated

Rich. Aye, aye, my lass, well said! I am agitated, true enough!
took flat aback, my girl, but 'tis naught 'twill pass. [Aside.]
This here heart of mine's a dictatin' to me like anythink.
Question is, have I a right to disregard its promptings?



i2 4 RUDDIGORE

Rose. Can I do aught to relieve thine anguish, for it seemeth to
me that thou art in sore trouble? This apple {Offering a
damaged apple. ]

Rich. [Looking at it and returning it. \ No, my lass, 'taint that:
I'm I'm took flat aback I never see anything like you
in all my born days. Parbuckle me, if you ain't the loveliest
gal I've ever set eyes on. There I can't say fairer than that,
can I?

Rose. No. [Aside.} The question is, is it meet that an utter
stranger should thus express himself? [Refers to book.] Yes,
" Always speak the truth."

Rich. I'd no thoughts of sayin' this here to you on my own account,
for, truth to tell, I was chartered by another; but when I see
you my heart it up and it says, says it, " This is the very lass
for you, Dick." " Speak up to her, Dick," it says (it calls me
Dick acos we was at school together) "tell her all, Dick," it
says, " never sail under false colours it 's mean!" That ''s what
my heart tells me to say, and in my rough, common-sailor
fashion, I've said it, and I'm a-waiting for your reply. I'm a
tremblin', miss. Lookye here [holding out his hand] that's
narvousness.

Rose. [Aside.] Now, how should a maiden deal with such an one?
[Consults book.] "Keep no one in unnecessary suspense."
[Aloud.] Behold, I will not keep you in unnecessary suspense.
[Refers to book.] " In accepting an offer of marriage, do so
with apparent hesitation." [Aloud.] I take you, but with a
certain show of reluctance. [Refers to book.] "Avoid any
appearance of eagerness." [Aloud.] Though you will bear in
mind that I am far from anxious to do so. [Refers to book.]
"A little show of emotion will not be misplaced!" [Aloud.]
Pardon this tear! [Wipes her eye.]

Rich. Rose, you've made me the happiest blue-jacket in England!
I wouldn't change places with the Admiral of the Fleet, no
matter who he's a huggin' of at this present moment! But,
axin' your pardon, miss [wiping his lips with his hand], might
I be permitted to salute the flag I'm a-goin' to sail under?

Rose. [Referring to book.] " An engaged young lady should not
permit too many familiarities." [Aloud.] Once! [RICHARD
kisses her.]



ENTER ROSE HE IS MUCH STRUCK BY HER

(p. 123)



RUDDIGORE 125

DUET

Rich. The battle 's roar is over,

O my love!
Embrace thy tender lover,

O my love!
From tempests' welter,

From war's alarms,
O give me shelter

Within those arms!
Thy smile alluring,
All heart-ache curing,
Gives peace enduring,
O my love!

Rose. If heart both true and tender,

O my love !
A life-love can engender,

O my love!
A truce to sighing

And tears of brine,
For joy undying

Shall aye be mine,
And thou and I, love,
Shall live and die, love,
Without a sigh, love
My own, my love!

Enter ROBIN, with Chorus of Bridesmaids

CHORUS

If well his suit has sped,
Oh, may they soon be wed !
Oh, tell us, tell us, pray,
What doth the maiden say?
In singing are we justified
" Hail the Bridegroom hail the Bride"

Rob. Well what news? Have you spoken to her?
Rich. Aye, my lad, I have so to speak spoke her.



126 RUDDIGORE

Rob. And she refuses?

Rich. Why, no, I can't truly say she do.

Rob. Then she accepts! My darling! [Embraces her.

BRIDESMAIDS

Hail the Bridegroom hail the Bride!
Let the nuptial knot be tied :

In fair phrases

Hymn their praises,
Hail the Bridegroom hail the Bride!

Rose. [Aside, referring to her book.] Now, what should a maiden

do when she is embraced by the wrong gentleman?
Rich. Belay, my lad, belay. You don't understand.
Rose. Oh, sir, belay, I beseech you !
Rich. You see, it's like this: she accepts but it's mel
Rob. You! [RICHARD embraces ROSE.

BRIDESMAIDS

Hail the Bridegroom hail the Bride!


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Online LibraryW. S. (William Schwenck) GilbertRuddigore : or, The witch's curse → online text (page 1 of 4)