Copyright
W. W. (William Wymark) Jacobs.

Sailors' knots online

. (page 11 of 15)
Online LibraryW. W. (William Wymark) JacobsSailors' knots → online text (page 11 of 15)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


heedless of the fateful seconds ticking from
the mantelpiece. At the sound of a slow,



SENTENCE DEFERRED 283

measured footfall on the cobblestone path
outside, Miss Pilbeam caught his arm and
drew him towards the door.

Go ! " she breathed. " No, stop ! "

She stood trying in vain to make up her
mind. "Upstairs," she said. "Quick I 11
and, leading the way, entered her father's
bedroom, and, after a moment's thought,
opened the door of a cupboard in the
corner.

" Get in there," she whispered.

41 But " objected the astonished Bligh.

The front door was heard to open.

"Police!" said Miss Pilbeam, in a thrilling
whisper. The skipper stepped into the cup-
board without further parley, and the girl,
turning the key, slipped it into her pocket
and sped downstairs.

Sergeant Pilbeam was in the easy-chair,
with his belt unfastened, when she entered
the parlour, and, with a hungry reference to
supper, sat watching her as she lit the lamp
and drew down the blind. With a life-long



284 SAILORS' KNOTS

knowledge of the requirements of the Force,
she drew a jug of beer and placed it by his
side while she set the table.

" Ah ! I wanted that," said the sergeant.
" I've been running."

Miss Pilbeam raised her eyebrows.

" After some sailor-looking chap that cap-
sized me when I wasn't prepared for it," said
her father, putting down his glass. "It was
a neat bit o 1 work, and I shall tell him so
when I catch him, Look here ! "

He stood up and exhibited the damage.

" I've rubbed off what I could," he said,
resuming his seat, "and I s'pose the rest'll
brush off when it's dry. To-morrow morn-
ing I shall go down to the harbour and try
and spot my lord."

He drew his chair to the table and helped
himself, and, filling his mouth with cold
meat and pickles, enlarged on his plans for
the capture of his assailant ; plans to which
the undecided Miss Pilbeam turned a some-
what abstracted ear.



SENTENCE DEFERRED 285

By the time her father had finished his
supper she was trying, but in vain, to devise
means for the prisoner's escape. The ser-
geant had opened the door of the room for
the sake of fresh air, and it was impossible
for anybody to come downstairs without
being seen. The story of a sickly geranium
in the back yard left him unmoved.

" I wouldn't get up for all the geraniums
in the world," he declared. " I'm just
going to have one more pipe and then I'm
off to bed. Running don't agree with
me."

He went, despite his daughter's utmost
efforts to prevent him, and she sat in silent
consternation, listening to his heavy tread
overhead. She heard the bed creak in
noisy protest as he climbed in, and ten
minutes later the lusty snoring of a healthy
man of full habit resounded through the
house.

She went to bed herself at last, and, after
lying awake for nearly a couple of hours,



286 SAILORS' KNOTS

closed her eyes in order to think better.
She awoke with the sun pouring in at the
window and the sounds of vigorous brush-
ing in the yard beneath.

14 I've nearly got it off," said the sergeant,
looking up, " It's destroying evidence in a
sense, I suppose ; but I can't go about with
my uniform plastered with mud. I've had
enough chaff about it as it is."

Miss Pilbeam stole to the door of the
next room and peeped stealthily in. Not
a sound came from the cupboard, and a
horrible idea that the prisoner might have
been suffocated set her trembling with
apprehension.

"ffst!" she whispered.

An eager but stifled " Hst!" came from
the cupboard, and Miss Pilbeam, her fears
allayed, stepped softly into the room.

" He's downstairs brushing the mud off,"
she said, in a low voice.

44 Who is ? " said the skipper.

44 The fat policeman," said the girl, in a



SENTENCE DEFERRED 287

hard voice, as she remembered her father's
wrongs.

" What's he doing it here for ? " demanded
the astonished skipper.

" Because he lives here."

41 Lodger?" queried the skipper, more
astonished than before.

" Father," said Miss Pilbeam.

A horrified groan from the cupboard fell
like music on her ears. Then the smile for-
sook her lips, and she stood quivering with
indignation as the groan gave way to sup-
pressed but unmistakable laughter.

" Hsh!" she said sharply, and with head
erect sailed out of the room and went down-
stairs to give Sergeant Pilbeam his breakfast.

To the skipper in the confined space and
darkness of the cupboard the breakfast
seemed unending. The sergeant evidently
believed in sitting over his meals, and his
deep, rumbling voice, punctuated by good-
natured laughter, was plainly audible. To
pass the time the skipper fell to counting,



288 SAILORS' KNOTS

and, tired of that, recited some verses that
he had acquired at school. After that, and
with far more heartiness, he declaimed a few
things that he had learned since ; and still
the clatter and rumble sounded from below.

It was a relief to him when he heard the
sergeant push his chair back and move
heavily about the room. A minute later he
heard him ascending the stairs, and then he
held his breath with horror as the footsteps
entered the room and a heavy hand was laid
on the cupboard door.

"Elsie!" bawled the sergeant " Where's
the key of my cupboard ? I want my other
boots."

11 They're down here," cried the voice of
Miss Pilbeam, and the skipper, hardly able
to believe in his good fortune, heard the
sergeant go downstairs again.

At the expiration of another week by his
own reckoning he heard the light, hurried
footsteps of Miss Pilbeam come up the
stairs and stop at the door.



SENTENCE DEFERRED 289

"ffst!" he said recklessly.

" I'm coming," said the girl. " Don't be
impatient."

A key turned in the lock. The door was
flung open, and the skipper, dazed and blink-
ing with the sudden light, stumbled into the
room.

" Father's gone," said Miss Pilbeam.

The skipper made no answer. He was
administering first aid to a right leg which
had temporarily forgotten how to perform its
duties, varied with slaps and pinches at a
left which had gone to sleep. At intervals
he turned a red-rimmed and reproachful eye
on Miss Pilbeam.

"You want a wash and some breakfast,"
she said softly, " especially awash. There's
water and a towel, and while you're making
yourself tidy I'll be getting breakfast."

The skipper hobbled to the wash-stand,
and, dipping his head in a basin of cool
water, began to feel himself again. By the

time he had done his hair in the sergeant's
19



2 9 o SAILORS' KNOTS

glass and twisted his moustache into shape
he felt better still, and he went downstairs
almost blithely.

" I am very sorry it was your father,"
he said, as he took a seat at the table.
-Very."

"That's why you laughed, I suppose?"
said the girl, tossing her head.

"Well, I've had the worst of it," said
the other. " I'd sooner be upset a hundred
times than spend a night in that cupboard.
However, all's well that ends well."

I 'Ah!" said Miss Pilbeam dolefully, "but
is it the end ? "

Captain Bligh put down his knife and
fork and eyed her uneasily.
" What do you mean ? " he said.

II Never mind ; don't spoil your break-
fast," said the girl. " I'll tell you after-
wards. It's hard to think, after all my
trouble, of your doing two months as well
as a night in the cupboard."

" Beastly," said the unfortunate, eyeing



SENTENCE DEFERRED 291

her in great concern. "But what's the
matter ? "

"One can't think of everything," said
Miss Pilbeam, "but, of course, we ought
to have thought of the mate getting uneasy
when you didn't turn up last night, and
going to the police-station with a descrip-
tion of you."

The skipper started and smote the table
with his fist.

"Father's gone down to watch the ship
now," said Miss Pilbeam. "Of course, it's
the exact description of the man that
assaulted him. Providential he called it."

"That's the worst of having a fool for
a mate," said the skipper bitterly. " What
business was it of his, I should like to
know? What's it got to do with him
whether I turn up or not? What does
he want to interfere for ? "

" It's no good blaming him," said Miss
Pilbeam, thinking deeply, with her chin on
her finger. "The thing is, what is to be



292 SAILORS' KNOTS

done? Once father gets his hand on
you "

She shuddered ; so did the skipper.

41 1 might get off with a fine ; I didn't hurt
him," he remarked.

Miss Pilbeam shook her head. " They're
very strict in Woodhatch," she said.

" I was a fool to touch him at all," said
the repentant skipper. " High spirits, that's
what it was. High spirits, and being spoken
to as if I was a child."

" The thing Is, how are you to escape ? "
said the girl. " It's no good going out of
doors with the police and half the people in
Woodhatch all on the look-out for you."

"If I could only get aboard I should
be all right," muttered the skipper. " I
could keep down the fo'c's'le while the
mate took the ship out."

Miss Pilbeam sat in deep thought. " It's
the getting aboard that's the trouble," she
said slowly. " You'd have to disguise
yourself. It would have to be a good dis-



SENTENCE DEFERRED 293

guise, too, to pass my father, I can tell
you."

Captain Bligh gave a gloomy assent.

"The only thing for you to do, so far
as I can see," said the girl slowly, "is to
make yourself up like a coalie. There are
one or two colliers in the harbour, and if
you took off your coat I could send it on
afterwards rubbed yourself all over with
coal-dust, and shaved off your moustache,
I believe you would escape."

"S&avef" ejaculated the skipper, in
choking accents. " Rub / Coal-dust / "

11 It's your only chance," said Miss Pilbeam.

Captain Bligh leaned back frowning, and
from sheer force of habit passed the ends of
his moustache slowly through his fingers.

" I think the coal-dust would be enough,"
he said at last.

The girl shook her head. " Father parti-
cularly noticed your moustache," she said.

" Everybody does," said the skipper, with
mournful pride. " I won't part with it."



294 SAILORS' KNOTS

"Not for my sake?" inquired Miss
Pilbeam, eyeing him mournfully. " Not
after all I've done for you?"

" No," said the other stoutly,

Miss Pilbeam put her handkerchief to her
eyes, and, with a suspicious little sniff, hurried
from the room. Captain Bligh, much affected,
waited for a few seconds and then went in
pursuit of her. Fifteen minutes later, shorn
of his moustache, he stood in the coal-hole,
sulkily smearing himself with coal.

" That's better/' said the girl; " you look
horrible."

She took up a handful of coal-dust, and,
ordering him to stoop, shampooed him with
hearty good-will.

" No good half doing it," she declared.
4 ' Now go and look at yourself in the glass in
the kitchen."

The skipper went, and came back in a
state of wild-eyed misery. Even Miss
Pilbeam's statement that his own mother
would not know him failed to lift the cloud



SENTENCE DEFERRED 295

from his brow. He stood disconsolate as the
girl opened the front door.

"Good-bye," she said gently. "Write
and tell me when you are safe."

Captain Bligh promised and walked slowly
up the road. So far from people attempting
to arrest him, they vied with each other in
giving him elbow-room. He reached the
harbour unmolested, and, lurking at a con-
venient corner, made a careful survey. A
couple of craft were working out their coal,
a small steamer was just casting loose, and a
fishing-boat gliding slowly over the still water
to its berth. His own schooner, which lay
near the colliers, had apparently knocked off
work pending his arrival. For Sergeant
Pilbeam he looked in vain.

He waited a minute or two, and then, with
a furtive glance right and left, strolled in a
careless fashion until he was abreast of one
of the colliers. Nobody took any notice of
him, and, with his hands in his pockets, he
gazed meditatively into the water and edged



296 SAILORS' KNOTS

along towards his own craft. His foot
trembled as he placed it on the plank that
formed the gangway, but, resisting the
temptation to look behind, he gained the
deck and walked forward.

" Halloa ! What do you want ? " inquired
a seaman, coming out of the galley.

11 All right, Bill," said the skipper, in a low
voice. " Don't take any notice of me."

" Eh ? " said the seaman, starting. " Good
lor' ! What ha' you "

"Shut up!" said the skipper fiercely;
and, walking to the forecastle, placed his
hand on the scuttle and descended with
studied slowness. As he reached the floor
the perturbed face of Bill blocked the
opening.

" Had an accident, cap'n?" he inquired
respectfully.

" No," snapped the skipper. " Come
down here quick ! Don't stand up there
attracting attention. Do you want the
whole town round you ? Come down ! "



SENTENCE DEFERRED 297

"I'm all right where I am," said Bill,
backing hastily as the skipper, putting a
foot on the ladder, thrust a black and
furious face close to his.

"Clear out, then," hissed the skipper.
" Go and send the mate to me. Don't
hurry. And if anybody noticed me come
aboard and should ask you who I am, say
I'm a pal of yours."

The seaman, marvelling greatly, with-
drew, and the skipper, throwing himself on
a locker, wiped a bit of grit out of his eye
and sat down to wait for the mate. He
was so long in coming that he waxed
impatient, and ascending a step of the
ladder again peeped on to the deck. The
first object that met his gaze was the figure
of the mate leaning against the side of the
ship with a wary eye on the scuttle.

" Come here," said the skipper.

" Anything wrong ? " inquired the mate,
retreating a couple of paces in dis-
order.



298 SAILORS' KNOTS

"ComzAere!" repeated the skipper.

The mate advanced slowly, and, In re-
sponse to an imperative command from the
skipper, slowly descended and stood regard-
ing him nervously.

" Yes ; you may look," said the skipper,
with sudden ferocity. " This is all your
doing. Where are you going ? "

He caught the mate by the coat as he
was making for the ladder, and hauled him
back again.

"You'll go when I've finished with you,"
he said grimly. " Now, what do you
mean by it? Eh? What do you mean
by it?"

" That's all right," said the mate, in a
soothing voice. " Don't get excited."

"Look at me!" said the skipper. "All
through your interfering. How dare you
go making inquiries about me?"

"Me?" said the mate, backing as far as
possible. " Inquiries ? "



SENTENCE DEFERRED 299

" What's it got to do with you if I stay
out all night?" pursued the skipper.

" Nothing," said the other feebly.

"What did you go to the police about me
for, then ? " demanded the skipper.

" Me ? " said the mate, in the shrill accents
of astonishment. "Me? I didn't go to no
police about you. Why should I ? "

" Do you mean to say you didn't report
my absence last night to the police?" said
the skipper sternly.

"Cert'nly not," said the mate, plucking up
courage. " Why should I ? If you like to
take a night off it's nothing to do with me.
I 'ope I know my duty better. I don't
know what you're talking about."

"And the police haven't been watching
the ship and inquiring for me ? " asked the
skipper.

The mate shook his bewildered head.
"Why should they?" he inquired.

The skipper made no reply. He sat



3 oo SAILORS' KNOTS

goggle-eyed, staring straight before him,
trying in vain to realise the hardness of
the heart that had been responsible for such
a scurvy trick.

41 Besides, it ain't the fust time you've
been out all night," remarked the mate
aggressively.

The skipper favoured him with a glance
the dignity of which was somewhat impaired
by his complexion, and in a slow and stately
fashion ascended to the deck. Then he
caught his breath sharply and paled be-
neath the coal-dust as he saw Sergeant
Pilbeam, in plain clothes, standing on the
quay, opposite the ship. By his side stood
Miss Pilbeam, and both, with a far-away
look in their eyes, were smiling vaguely
but contentedly at the horizon. The ser-
geant appeared to be the first to see the
skipper.

" Ahoy, Darkie ! " he cried.

Captain Bligh, who was creeping slowly







'GIVE THIS TO THE SKIPPER, WILL YOU, MY LAD?' SAID THE SERGEANT



SENTENCE DEFERRED 301

aft, halted, and, clenching his fists, regarded
him ferociously.

"Give this to the skipper, will you, my
lad ? " said the sergeant, holding up the
jacket Bligh had left behind. " Good-look-
ing young man with a very fine moustache
he is."

11 Was/ 1 said his daughter, in a mournful
voice.

44 And a rather dark complexion," con-
tinued the sergeant, grinning madly. 4< I
was going to take him for stealing my coal
but I thought better of it. Thought of a
better way. At least, my daughter did. So
long, Darkie."

He kissed the top of a fat middle finger,
and, turning away, walked off with Miss
Pilbeam. The skipper stood watching them
with his head swimming until, arrived at the
corner, they stopped and the sergeant came
slowly back.

44 1 was nearly forgetting/ 1 he said slowly.



302 SAILORS' KNOTS

" Tell your skipper if so be as he wants
to apologise for stealing my coal I shall
be at home at tea at five o'clock."

He jerked his thumb in the direction of
Miss Pilbeam and winked with slow delibera-
tion. " She'll be there, too," he added.
11 Savvy ?"



Printed by BALLANTYNE, HANSON &> Co.
Edinburgh <Sr London



A SELECTION OF BOOKS

PUBLISHED BY METHUEN

AND CO. LTD., LONDON

36 ESSEX STREET

W.C.



CONTENTS



General Literature ... 2

Ancient Cities .... 13

Antiquary's Books ... 13

Arden Shakespeare ... 14

Classics of Art . . 14

'Complete' Series ... 15

Connoisseur's Library . . 15

Handbooks of English Church

History ..... r6

Handbooks of Theology . . 16

1 Home Life ' Series ... 16
Illustrated Pocket Library of

Plain and Coloured Books . 16

Leaders of Religion . . 17

Library of Devotion . . 17

Little Books on Art . . 18

Little Galleries . . . 18

Little Guides .... 18

Little Library .... 19



Little Quarto Shakespeare
Miniature Library .
New Library of Medicine
New Library of Music .
Oxford Biographies .
Four Plays.
States of Italy .
Westminster Commentaries
1 Young ' Series .
Shilling Library
Books for Travellers
Some Books on Art.
Some Books on Italy

Fiction

Books for Boys and Girls
Shilling Novels .
Sevenpenny Novels . .



23
24

25

3
3



SEPTEMBER 1913



A SELECTION OF

MESSRS. METHUEN'S
PUBLICATIONS



IN this Catalogue the order is according to authors. An asterisk denotes
that the hook is in the press.

Colonial Editions are published of all Messrs. METHUEN'S Novels issued
at a price above zs. 6d., and similar editions are published of some works of
General Literature. Colonial Editions are only for circulation in the British
Colonies and India.

All books marked net are not subject to discount, and cannot be bought
at less than the published price. Books not marked net are subject to the
discount which the bookseller allows.

Messrs. METHUEN'S books are kept in stock by all good booksellers. If
there is any difficulty in seeing copies, Messrs. Methuen will be very glad to
have early information, and specimen copies of any books will be sent on
receipt of the published price plus postage for net books, and of the published
price for ordinary books.

This Catalogue contains only a selection of the more important books
published by Messrs. Methuen. A complete and illustrated catalogue of their
publications may be obtained on application.



Abraham (G. D.). MOTOR WAYS IN
LAKELAND. Illustrated. Demy too.
js. 6d. net.

Adoock (A. St. John). THE BOOK-
LOVER'S LONDON. Illustrated. Cr.
Bvo. dr. net.

*Ady (Cecilia M.). PIUS II.: THE
HUMANIST POPE. Illustrated. Demy two.
io9. 6d. net.

Andrewes (Lancelot). PRECES PRI-
VATAE. Translated and edited, with
Notes, by F. E. BRIGHTMAN. Cr. Bvo. 6s.

Aristotle. THE ETHICS. Edited, with
an Introduction and Notes, by JOHN
BURNET. Demy Bvo. los. 6d. net.

Atkinson (C. T.). A HISTORY OF GER-
MANY, 1715-1815. Demy Bvo. its. 6d. net.

Atkinson (T. D.). ENGLISH ARCHI-
TECTURE. Illustrated. Third Edition.
Feat. Bvo. 3-r. 6d. net.

A GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN
ENGLISH ARCHITECTURE. Illus-
trated. Second Edition. Fcap. Bvo. 3^. 6d.

ENGLISH AND WELSH CATHE-
DRALS. Illustrated. Demy Bvo. los. 6d.
net.

Bain (P. W.). A DIGIT OF THE MOON:
A HINDOO LOVE STORY. Tenth Edition.
Fcap. Bvo. 3J. 6d. net.



THE DESCENT OF THE SUN : A CYCLE

OF BIRTH. Fifth Edition. Fcap. Bvo.

3S. 6d. net.
A HEIFER OF THE DAWN. Seventh

Edition. Fcap. Bvo. zs. dd. net.
IN THE GREAT GOD'S HAIR. Fifth

Edition. Fcap. Bvo. zs. 6d. net.
A DRAUGHT OF THE BLUE. Fifth

Edition Fcap. Bvo. zs. 6d. net.
AN ESSENCE OF THE DUSK. Third

Edition. Fcap. Bvo. zs. 6d. net.
AN INCARNATION OF THE SNOW.

Third Edition. Fcap. Bvo. 3 s. 6d. net.
A MINE OF FAULTS. Third Edition.

Fcap. Bvo. 3^. 6d. net.
THE ASHES OF A GOD. Second Edition.

Fcap. Bvo. 3$. 6d. net.
BUBBLES OF THE FOAM. Fcap. 4 to.

$s. net. Also Fcap. Bvo. 3*. 6d. net.

Balfour (Graham). THE LIFE OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON. Illus-
trated. Eleventh Edition. In one Volume.
Cr. Bvo. Buckram, 6s.
Also Fcap. Bvo. is. net.

Baring (Hon. Maurice). LANDMARKS

IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE. Second

Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s. net.
RUSSIAN ESSAYS AND STORIES.

Second Edition. Cr. Bvo. 5-f- **
THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE. Demy Bvo.

154. net.



GENERAL LITERATURE



Baring-Gould (S.). THE LIFE OF

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Illustrated.

Second Edition. Royai Bvo. los. 6d. net.
THE TRAGEDY OF THE CAESARS:

A STUDY OF THE CHARACTERS OF THE

CKSARS OF THE JULIAN AND CLAUDIAN

HOUSES. Illustrated. Seventh Edition.

Royal Bvo. los. 6d. net.
THE VICAR OF MORWENSTOW. With

a Portrait. Third Edition. Cr.Bvo. y.td.

A Iso Fcap. Bvo. is. net.
OLD COUNTRY LIFE. Illustrated. Fifth

Edition. Large Cr. Bvo. 6s.

A Iso Feat. Bvo. i s. net.
A BOOK OF CORNWALL. Illustrated.

Third Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s.
A BOOK OF DARTMOOR. Illustrated.

Second Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s.
A BOOK OF DEVON. Illustrated. Third

Edition. Cr. %vo. 6*.

Baring-Gould (8.) and Sheppard (H. Fleet-
wood). A GARLAND OF COUNTRY
SONG. English Folk Songs with their
Traditional Melodies. Demy ,\to. 6s.

SONGS OF THE WEST. Folk Songs of
Devon and Cornwall. Collected from the
Mouths of the People. New and Revised
Edition, under the musical editorship of
CECIL J. SHARP. Large Imperial Bvo.
$s. net.

Barker (E.). THE POLITICAL
THOUGHT OF PLATO AND ARIS-
TOTLE. Demy Bvo. IQJ. 6d. net.

Bastable (C. F.). THE COMMERCE OF
NATIONS. Sixth Edition. Cr. Bvo.

2S.6J.

Beckford (Peter). THOUGHTS ON
HUNTING. Edited by J. OTHO PAGET.
Illustrated. Third Edition. Demy Bvo. 6j.

Belloc (H.). PARIS. Illustrated Third

Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s.
HILLS AND THE SEA. Fourth Edition.

Fcap. Bvo. S.T.

Also Fcaf. Bvo. is. net.
ON NOTHING AND KINDRED SUB-
JECTS. Third Edition. Fcap. Bvo. 55.
ON EVERYTHING. Third Edition. Fcap.

Bvo. $s.
ON SOMETHING. Second Edition. Fcap.

Bvo. 5J.
FIRST AND LAST. Second Edition.

Fcap. Bvo. 55
THIS AND THAT AND THE OTHER.

Second Edition. Fcap. Bvo. $r.
MARIE ANTOINETTE. Illustrated.

Third Edition. Demy Bvo. \$s. net.
THE PYRENEES. Illustrated. Second

Edition. Demy Bvo. js. 6d. net.

Bennett (Arnold). THE TRUTH ABOUT
AN AUTHOR. Crown Bvo. 6s.

Bennett (W. H.). A PRIMER OF THE
BIBLE. Fifth Edition. Cr. Bvo. zs. 6d.



Bennett (W. H.) and Adeney (W. F.). A
BIBLICAL INTRODUCTION. With a
concise Bibliography. Sixth Edition. Cr,
Bvo. js. 6d. Also in Two Volumes. Cr.
Bvo. Each 3^. 6d. net.

Benson (Archbishop). GOD'S BOARD.
Communion Addresses. Second Edition.
Fcap. Bvo. S.T. 6d. net.

*Berriman (Algernon E.). AVIATION.
Illustrated. Cr. Bvo. IOJT. 6d. net.

BIcknell (Ethel E.). PARIS AND HER
TREASURES. Illustrated. Fcap. Bvo.
Round corners. $s. net.

Blake (William). ILLUSTRATIONS OF
THE BOOK OF JOB. With a General
Introduction by LAURENCE BINYON. Illus-
trated. Quarto. 2is. net.

Bloemfontein (Bishop of)* ARA CCELI :
AN ESSAY IN MYSTICAL THEOLOGY.
Fifth Edition. Cr. Bvo. 3^. 6d. net.

FAITH AND EXPERIENCE. Second
Edition. Cr. Bvo. 3^. 6d. net.

*Boulenger (G. A.). THE SNAKES OF
EUROPE. Illustrated. Cr. Bvo. 6s.

Bowden (E. M.). THE IMITATION OF
BUDDHA. Quotations from Buddhist
Literature for each Day in the Year. Sixth
Edition. Cr. \6ino. zs. 6d.

Brabant (F. G.)- RAMBLES IN SUSSEX.
Illustrated. Cr. Bvo. 6s.

Bradley (A. G.). THE ROMANCE OF
NORTHUMBERLAND. Illustrated.

Third Edition. Demy Bvo. js. 6d. net.

Braid (James). ADVANCED GOLF.

Illustrated. Seventh Edition. Demy Bvo.
los. 6d. net.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 13 14 15

Online LibraryW. W. (William Wymark) JacobsSailors' knots → online text (page 11 of 15)