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Wallace Melvin Morgan.

History of Kern County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present; online

. (page 80 of 177)
Online LibraryWallace Melvin MorganHistory of Kern County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present; → online text (page 80 of 177)
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stockraising on Mount Breckenridge. From his advent in the county his
summers were spent in the South Fork country and he has been a permanent



760 HISTORY OF KERN COUNTY

resident of this section since l'J05, meanwhile maintaining a close association
with local advancement along every line of progress.

The title by which Judge Vrooman is familiarly known came to him
through his occupancy of the ofifice of justice of the peace of the first judicial
township of Kern county, to which office he was elected in 1910 on the Repub-
lican ticket. During January of 1911 he took the oath of office and entered
upon its duties, which he has since discharged with impartiality, efficiency
and exceptional promptness. The judicial district is the oldest in the county
and he has in his office the docket extending back into the '60s, when it was a
part of Tulare county. His office is located at Isabella, it being the most
central place in the judicial township. On the organization of the Bakersfield
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, he became one of its charter members, and in
addition he is a member of the Delta Psi. In the midst of his labors as a
stockraiser and as a justice he has never lost his early interest in educational
matters. The relinquishment of the work of teaching did not mean an aban-
dLument of interest in the profession. In every way possible he has striven to
promote the success of the public school system, which he believes to lie at the
very foundation of all future prosperity and progress in our country. For
eight years he served as a member of the county board of education and during
part of the time he was honored by being chosen president of the board, in
which capacity he was instrumental in promoting the welfare of the schools
and advancing the standard of education in the county.

JAMES E. CHITTENDEN.вАФ The state of Illinois has taken a place in
the history of the development of western America as a stopping place for
pioneers from the East and a breeding ground of pioneers destined for the
tar west. Among well known citizens of Kern county, Cal., who were born in
the Prairie State none are better or more favorably known than is James E.
Chittenden, of Glennville. Mr. Chittenden was born in Warsaw, Hancock
county. 111., May 17, 1839, and when he was old enough entered public school
there and studied until he was about fifteen years old. His father, E. F. Chit-
tenden, crossed the plains to California in 1852 and the rest of the family, the
mother and four children, came to the state in 1855 by way of the Isthmus of
Panama, and settlement was made at Calaveras, fifteen miles from Stockton.
There James E. worked for his father until he was twenty-four years old,
and then for six years he was a salesman in the employ of Bowen Brothers in
Stockton. Taking up his residence in Sacramento he was employed during the
ensuing six years in a pre duce house. For a time he was a proof reader on the
Sacramento Union and assisted in the delivery of the paper to its subscribers.
After his father's death he returned to Stockton in order the better to help
care for the household. There he engaged in the notion and cigar business,
continuing this for stime time, besides which he was agent for and manager
of the Stockton Theatre. Subsequently he became agent of the Southern Pa-
cific road at Banta Station. His identification with Kern county dates from the
year 1875 and soon after coming here he located at Sumner, where he estab-
lished himself in the general commission business which ultimately grew to
large proportions. In 1890 he settled on the property which has come to be
known as his home place, on Sandy creek near Glennville. It consists of
three hundred and twenty acres, of which about sixty-five acres are under
cultivation, thirty acres in alfalfa and the remainder in fruit. His chief busi-
ness, however, is the raising cf horses, cattle and hogs. His buildings, ap-
pointments and implements are thoroughly up-to-date and his methods are
modern and productive of the best results.

Politically Mr. Chittenden is a stanch Republican. In 1888 he was united
in marriage with Mrs. Elizabeth (Clapp) Rigby, a native of Eldorado county,
Cal. She passed away October 17, 1905, having become the mother of five
children, of whom four are living, as follows : Virgil E.. a rancher in Linn's




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Online LibraryWallace Melvin MorganHistory of Kern County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present; → online text (page 80 of 177)