Walter Damrosch.

Cyrano : an opera in four acts online

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shame !

(She sits at the table and bathes his
hand with the water in the glass.)

ROXANE.

You've been in a fight, you naughty

child!
Xow tell the truth at once.

CYRANO (laughing).

'Tis naught.

Some fivescore fools a little wild
B.y me alone were caught.
'Twas something else you thought but
did not dare

ROXANE.

But now I know that you will really

care;
For with the perfume of the happy

past
I breathe resolve my aching heart

to cast
Upon your patience. There is one I

love.



CYRANO (aside}.

Now give me strength, ye holy
powers above.

ROXANE.
As yet he knows it not.

CYRANO.
Ah!

ROXANE.
But soon he will.

CYRANO.
Ah!

ROXANE.

Poor boy, he dares not speak his

burning thought :
But from his eyes his heart streams

out in fire.



CYRANO.



Ah!



ROXANE (completing the bandage on
his liand).

And he, too. is a Gascony cadet.
And in your company. Is not that
strange ?



Ah!



CYRANO.



ROXANE.



He wears upon his noble brow the

stamp
Of intellect, of genius. And he's

brave,
And handsome as a young Olympian

god.

CYRANO (starting up}.
Handsome !

ROXANE.

As yet we have but spoken with our
eyes.

CYRANO.

His name?

ROXANE.
Baron Christian de Neuvilette.



14



CYRANO



CYRANO.

Why tell you this to me?

ROXANE.

Because I hear

That all you Gascons quarrel every

day,
And that your dinner guests are

swords and death.
But you who face a hundred men and

laugh
To scorn the flash of every naked

blade

CYRANO.

Alight keep your little baron safe from

harm.
I see. Your elder brother am I once

again.

ROXANE.

And never in a duel shall he fight?

CYRANO.
I swear it.

ROXANE.
Oh, I really love you quite!

(During the latter part of the above
dialogue RAGUENEAU has appeared
at the door, trying to engage the
DUENNA in conversation. She has
eaten all her tarts and RAGUENEAU
in pantomime tries to interest her in
the poems on the bags. She is not
pleased, and he gives her more
tarts, zvhich she eats. She and
RAGUENEAU gradually come doivn
the stage on the side opposite to
CYRANO and ROXANE.) QUARTET.

ROXANE.

The dream of my sorrow is broken,

The dawn of my hope is here;
For the word which thy lip has

spoken,

^ Has emptied my heart of fear.
The world and my life grow golden

In the light of a new-born day;
And I fly from the darkness olden,
To sunrise I float away.



CYRANO.

The dream of my fancy is broken,

The dawn cometh gray and drear;
For the word which thy lip has
spoken.

Has melted my heart to a tear.
My summer is past and is over,

And the sun goes out of the day,
As the blossom is blown from the
clover;

The world goes cold and gray.

RAGUENEAU.

Look not in the bag. but upon it,

Where grow all sweets of the brain ;
A triolet, ballad or sonnet,

Shall make every tartlet vain.
Oh, were I of poets the master,

I'd fly from my shop far away ;
I'd be a perennial faster.

And carol my songs all day.

DUENNA.

Oh, give me a honey-filled pastry,

A well-flavored wafer or tart;
A spice of confection that's tasty,

Is better than your limping art.
Oh, were I of poets the master,

I'd drive them all far, far away;
And nevermore be a pale faster,

But eat all the livelong dav.

o j

(At the close of the quartet ROXANE
and DUENNA exeunt, while CYRANO
stands silent and RAGUENEAU goes
on declaiming.']

RAGUENEAU.

Into the outer darkness of the night
Hurl pastries and confections vain ;

Within make sunrise of eternal light
With bright confections of the
poet's brain.

(A sudden noise is heard outside.
Shouts of the cadets. Then enter
the Gascon y cadets, CARBON DE
CASTLE- JALOUX and LE BRET.)



He is here !



Captain !



CARBON.



CYRANO.



CYRANO



15



THE: CADETS.

A hundred to one and the one

victorious,

Ventre St. Gris, but that was
glorious !

(CADETS surround CYRANO and shake
his hands.}

LE BRET.

Be on your guard. Here comes De
Guiche.

{Enter DE GUICHE with attendants. )

DE GUICHE.

Monsieur de Bergerac, I must be

frank ;
You fought me fairly and you fairly

won.
So let that pass ; for now the chance

of war
Decides that we shall battle side by

side.

I hear that I am fortunate in this.
And so I come to view you at your

ease.

CYRANO.
The Gascony cadets are ne'er at ease.

CASTEL.

Since here am I and all my good com-
mand, i .
Pray, Cyrano, present us in due form.

CYRANO.

\Ve are the Gascony cadets,

Who value life not at a breath,

And whistle in the teeth of death.

We are the Gascony cadets ;

We wear our feathers curled in sets,

All fighters, liars, devils we,

The wild cadets of Gascony,

AVith titled names and nameless debts.

We are the Gascony cadets,

We love to make our rendezvous

Where foes are fierce and we are few ;

For there the Gascon rapier gets

The food that still its hunger whets ;

Lunge and parry, cut and thrust,

Like the whirlwind, gust on gust,

Charge the Gascony cadets.

W r e are the Gascony cadets.

With limb of snipe and tooth of fox.



And hearts as hard as mountain rocks.
Cat beards and eyes of falconets,
We come, our captain's grizzled pets,
To where the battle smoke is blue,
And there the roads of death we hue;
We are the Gascony cadets !

CHORUS (ad libitum).

Beware the pace our anger sets :
For they that follow, they that fly,
But meet the Gascon sword to die ;
We are the Gascony cadets !

DE GUICHE.

Farewell, Messieurs !

Soon your valor shall be tried.



GUICHE exit with his attendants.)
(The cadets retire up the stage.)

(Christian has come in and mingled
with the cadets at the back. The\
ignore him. He comes down at the
conclusion of CYRANO'S song and
seats himself at a small table zvhere
LISE serves him.}

A CADET.
Cyrano, your story.

CYRANO.
Presently. (Goes up with LE BRET.)

CADET.

Oh, tell the story for our novice here ;
'Twill teach him what he must expect
from us.



Novice !



CHRISTIAN.



CADET.



'Twere best to warn you now, my pal-
lid friend,

There's one thing that you must not
speak about.

(Lays his finger on his nose.')

Or else you'll have yon tiger on your
back.

CHRISTIAN.

It is the? Thanks. But tell me
P ra . v



16



CYRANO



When southern gentles far too boast-
ful grow,

What should a northern soldier find
to do?

CADET.

Prove that the north has courage like
the south.



CHRISTIAN.



I thank you.

CADETS (in a clamor).
The story, the story !

CYRANO.

(Comes down and seats himself in the
center. Cadets surround him.
CHRISTIAN sits a little in front and
at the side.)

'Twas only an evening of sport ;
And the moon, fickle lady, smiled

bright,

Then suddenly hid, and the night
Was as dark as the Pharaoh's court.
I declare I could not see as far

CHRISTIAN.

As your nose !

( General consternation. CYRANO rises
slowly. )

CYRANO.
Who is that man?

CARBON.
He joined this morning.

CYRANO.
His name?

CARBON.
Baron Christian de Xeuvilette.

CYRANO. (Aside.)

Roxane! Mon dieu!

(Slowly reseats himself.)

( Restraining himself. )

I declare I could not see as far

As the lamp in the street on my right.

(Consternation. All resume their

seats. )
When at once rose a cry of "A mort !"



And I found myself hemmed in by

steel.
But I parried. I lunged and I thrust



CHRISTIAN.



Your nose.



CYRANO (restraining himself with
difficulty).

I warded a blow

CHRISTIAN.
From your nose.

CYRANO.
Clear the room ! (Springs to his feet.)

(The cadets rise hastily and start for
the door.)

CADETS (sotto voce).

What shall we see when we come

back?
Yon idiot's dust in every crack !

(AH go out except CYRANO and
CHRISTIAN. They stand gazing at
one another a moment.)

CYRANO.
You may embrace me.

CHRISTIAN.
What is this you say?

CYRANO.
You may embrace me.

CHRISTIAN.
But I do not understand.

CYRANO.

I am her cousin and she calls me now
Her brother. She has told me all the

tale.

CHRISTIAN.
Does she love me ?



CYRANO



17



CYRANO.

Perhaps. (Lays his hand on Chris-

i's shoulder.}
How handsome !
Roxane expects a letter from you soon.

CHRISTIAN.
Alas !

I am a fool in use of words.
I love, K.t have no tongue to speak of

love.
I am a very dunce in talk.

CYRANO.
My wit I'll lend you if you like.

CHRISTIAN.
\Yhat mean you?

CYRANO.

Let me then explain.

V\'e two shall woo her as a single one ;

You with the face of Love her eye to

reach,
I with the promptings of your every

speech ;
And in a twinkling the thing is done.

CHRISTIAN.
And you would do this thing for me?

CYRANO.

For you ? For my amusement ! You
agree ?

CHRISTIAN.

Oh. gladly. Hut the letter that should
go at once?

CYRANO {producing his letter from
his bosom).

The letter? Here it is.



CHRISTIAN.
But will this letter suit Roxane?

CYRANO.

As if 'twere made for her.

(They stand embraced.)

(Cadets one by one put their heads in
at the door. They arc amazed.')

CADETS.

Oh, wonderful! V\"hat means it?
They embrace !

(Cadets all come down. Also the TALL,
MUSKETEER.)

(Enter LISE and RAGUENEAU.)

THE MUSKETEER.

Oh, now it seems there are no blows,
If one presumes to talk about a nose.

( Goes up to CYRANO.)
Monsieur, pray tell me what can make
so huge a smell ?

CYRANO (turning quickly and s f riki;ifj
him i.

Thy nose, thou idiot, in the stews of
hell !

CADETS.

Beware the pace our anger sets ;
For they that follow, they that fly,
Hut meet the Gascon sword to die;
We are the Gascony cadets !

(.-Is thev sing the refrain of the song.
thc\ dance and turn somersaults in
jo\ at seeing CYRANO himself
again.}

Curtain.



18



CYRANO



ACT III.



CHORUS.



Roses are ever fair;

So is love sweet ;
Love and roses are rare.

And life is like wind fleet ;

Life and roses are at love's feet.
Love's feet are on the hearts of kings ;

Love's kisses are on the lip of

death ;
Love's song is mute for him who sings

Songs made alone of life and breath.
Love's song is strong

\Yhere life and death meet ;
Love and death are long,

And life is like wind fleet;

Death and life are at love's feet.

(Rfx.\NE and DUENNA come out of
the house of CLOMIRE.)

ROXANE.

So dies the music in the soul of night.
Like sighs upon the rosy lips of Love.
Here let us tarry while I bathe my

soul
In these pale fountains of most chaste

delight.

(DUENNA retires up stage. ROXANE
sits by the floivcr bed in the center
of the stage in the moonlight.)

ROXANE.

Here do I let my hungry fancy pass
The bolted gates of maiden secrecy.
To browse upon the pastures of his

wit.
The scented clover blossoms of his

thought
Yea, on his words my soul is waxing

great ;
Oh, Christian, it must widen to' the

skies

Ere it shall make a circle of such girth
As may embrace the stature of thy

mind !

(At the conclusion of the solo the
DUENNA conies down. )



DUENNA.



Be warned in time, for by my fickle

eyes
Through yonder street I see De

Guiche approach.

ROXANE.
A shadow on the silver of the moon.

(Enter DE GUICHE.)

DE GUICHE.

Fortune favors me for once at least.
I find you in the moonlight like a beam
Of Cynthia's gladsome smile upon the

night.
I come to say adieu.

ROXANE.
You will depart ?

DE GUICHE.

I go to war. There is a siege around
The walls of Arras. I am to command.

ROXANE.
I wish you joy.

DE GUICHE.

It is no joy to part.

"When I am with mv Gasconv cadets



ROXANE.



Your what?



DE GUICHE.

My Gascony cadets.

They are a portion of my new

command.

Your cousin Cyrano is in my power;
Trust me to make him know that well.



CYRANO



19



ROXANE (singing to a scat on the
. bench).

Christian !

DE GUICHE.
You fear for him?



For whom ?



ROXANE.



DE GUICHE.



For Cyrano.

ROXANE.

Bah ! For Cyrano ! It is not he

indeed ;
/Mid yet I grieve that one for whom I

care
Should face the danger of a dreadful

war.

DE GUICHE (astonished and pleased).
At last upon the eve of going hence
You speak to me in kindness. It is

sweet.

ROXANE.

You take revenge but weakly. Cyrano
Will bubble o'er with joy to go to war.
If you would make him suffer, keep

him here,
A prisoner of inaction while you

march.

DE GUICHE.

A woman's wit ! It is a keen revenge.
I have the orders for the wild cadets.
I'll keep them here.

(Touches his pocket.)
So you sometimes play tricks?

ROXANE. '
I do. sometime^

DE GUICHE.

I love you to distraction.

I go but to return. Another day

Let Arras wait for succor; meanwhile

I

Pretending to have started shall abide
\Yith Capuchins near by. An hour

from now
With mask upon my face I shall

return.

When yonder orb of night shall dimly
burn (Exit DE GUICHE.)



ROXANE.

Mine be the task to keep thee far

away.

What maters all since Christian is to
. stay?

( ROXANE goes into the house followed
by the DUENNA.)

(Enter CYRANO and CHRISTIAN.)

CYRANO.

My friend, you are insane. I have not
yet

Rehearsed you in the speeches for to-
night.

You must not speak to her 'till you
have learned

The items of the dialogue.

CHRISTIAN,

It wearies me

To borrow all my words. 'Twas well

at first,
But now I feel she loves me. and

alone
Without your prompting will 1 speak

to her.

CYRANO.

'Twere better if you would prepare a
trope

CHRISTIAN.

A plague upon your tropes. My two
good arms

Shall bind her to me in a warm em-
brace,

And she shall know I love her well.

(The door of ROXANE'S house opens
and site is seen at the threshold.')

Do not leave me ! See, she comes !



CYRANO.

My friend. I shall not meddle. I fse
your arms.

(Retires behind the u'all. >

( ROXANE comes out and lingers be-
side the fountain.}

ROXANE

Thrice the icy Cynthia hath described
I ler orbit pale since that I waited here,
And still he does not come.



20



Roxane !



CHRISTIAN.



ROXANE.



Ah, you have come. Well then, we

are alone ;
The air is mild ; the moon is clear and

high.
Sit here; I'll listen while you talk to

me.

(CHRISTIAN sits beside her on the
bench and shozvs that he does not
know what to say. Finally he speaks
in desperation.}

CHRISTIAN.
I love you.

ROXANE.

" \

Then dilate upon your love.
CHRISTIAN.



CYRANO

ROXANE.
Oh, stupid! (Rises.)

CHRISTIAN.
No, I don't.

ROXANE.



I love you.



ROXANE.



That is twice I've heard your theme.
Play variations on it, fast and 'slow.
Come, improvise. You have a perfect
theme.

/

CHRISTIAN.
I love you very much.

ROXANE.
Prosaic, bald.

CHRISTIAN.

'Twould be a joy

To think that you in good return loved
me.

ROXANE.
Nay, tell me how you love me.

CHRISTIAN.

Why, I said

With all my heart.

ROXANE.
Do better

CHRISTIAN.
I love you just as much as I can love.



More stupid! (She mores toward the
house.)

CHRISTIAN.
Love makes of me a fool.

ROXANE.

So I've observed.

It irks me, sir. as if you had put off

The pleasing front which nature gave

to you.
Go, my friend, and find your scattered

wits. (She goes into the house.}

CHRISTIAN (following her to the
door).

Roxane ! Roxane !

(Re-enter CYRANO accompanied by
two pages with lutes.)

CYRANO.

Victorious, you have driven he: from
the field.

CHRISTIAN.

Help me, Cyrano, I am undone

CYRANO.

It wearies you to borrow all your
words.

CHRISTIAN.

Oh, do not jest. I tell you I shall die
If to her favor I am not restored.

(Light appears in the balcony

window. )
Oh, look ! '

CYRANO.

Be silent. All may yet be saved.
( To the pages.)

Go stand upon the corners of the

street,
And if a woman comes play out a tune



CYRANO



21



That's merry; if a man, a sad one;

go-

{The pages go off in opposite direc-
tions. )

Stand you beneath the balcony, and
say

Verbatim every word I say to you.

Now call to her.



CHRISTIAN.



Roxane.



ROXANE (opening the window).
Who calls?



'Tis I.



CHRISTIAN.



ROXANE.



Ah, yes, you've come to say with all

your heart
And very much. You do not love me

more.

CHRISTIAN (prompted by CYRANO).

How could I love you more? There is

no more
Than all.

ROXANE.
Your wit the darkness doth restore.

CHRISTIAN.

Love makes a cradle of my sigh-
rocked heart,

And grows so great he tears it all
apart.

ROXANE.

Then you should smother him by slow
degrees.

CHRISTIAN.

But, madame, he's a little Hercules,
\Yho had to struggle when he lately

tried
To overcome the twins Mistrust and

Pride.

ROXANE.

You are improving, but your speech

doth halt;
Pray tell me why your fancy is at

fault.



CYRANO (to CHRISTIAN).

It is too hard. Now let me answer

straight,

And you the issue of the contest wait.
(Takes CHRISTIAN'S place).

ROXANE.

Your words come lamely, yet you are
quite near.

CYRANO.

They have to grope through dark-
ness to your ear.

ROXANE.
Mine have no trouble.

CYRANO.

Mine climb, yours do but fall ;

I catch them in my heart. Your ear

is small ;
My heart is large, for love has made

it wide.

ROXANE.

You're doing better. Now your words

up ride
Like soaring hawks upon the sea of

night.

CYRANO.

Like birds they fly up to the brilliant

light
Like birds thev flutter round it in their



fright.



ROXANE.



If flying is too great a burden, friend,
Wait but a little and I will descend.

CYRANO.

No, stay ; let us now have done with

verbal feats!

The night is 'holy; let us keep it so,
By letting our sweet thoughts un-

jeweled go
As Nature made them. Hence with

guard and thrust
Of cunning words. Oh, think the time

supreme,
The time of which all earthly lovers

dream.
And let us speak as only lovers must.



22



CYRANO



ROXANE.

Oh. say no more! I tremble at thy

word ;
My heart is fluttering like a frightened

bird.
And if thou wilt, thou mayest ascend

to bliss,
If IK re thou findest it.

CYRANO (pushing CHRISTIAN).
Go take thy kiss.

( CHRISTIAN climbs to the balcony and
embraces ROXANE.)



CHRISTIAN.



Oh. m\- love !



CYRANO.



Turn in my heart, thou deadly knife

of woe !

hives he. I, Lazarus, below.
Vet on his lips she doth her p:ission

wreak
1 "pon the words that Cyrano did

speak.

(The lutes arc heard.}

A tune that's merry and a time that's

sad.
"Pis neither man nor woman: that's a

monk. (He pretends to run in from

i distance.)
. lo, there, Roxane !



\Vhocalls?



ROXANE.



CYRANO.



'Tis Cyrano.

Is Christian there?

CHRISTIAN.

My friend, you see me here.

ROXANE.

I will come down.

( ROXAXE disappears in the house.
CHRISTIAN descends. The MONK
enters.)

CYRANO i to the MONK).
I bow before your robe.



MONK.

Pax vobiscum. Madeleine Robin
1 come to seek.

CHRISTIAN.
'Tis here she lives.

f ROXANE conies out accompanied bv
page with lantern.)

ROXANE.

What is

The call? ( MONK hands her a letter.)
'Tis from De Guiche.

CHRISTIAN.
The villain dares !

ROXANE (motioning to him to wait).

(Reading. )

My regiment is marching. I am
thought to have gone. I wait here
at the convent and send you word by
the priest. In an hour I shall be
with you. Provide to receive me
alone, and- ( To the priest.)

Know you what this letter doth con-
tain?

I am commanded by my lord De
Guiche

To let you marry me unto this man.
( Pointing to CHRISTIAN.

MONK.
A worthy gentleman. Be reconciled.

ROXANE.
I shall endeavor.

( Page opens the house door for the
priest. ROXANE speaks quickly to
CYRANO.)

When De Guiche shall come.

As this informs me that he will, do

you
Detain him 'till the nuptial knot is tied.

CYRANO (pushing all toward the
house).

Go in, go in ! I shall be sentry here.
(They go in.)



CYRANO



23



CYRANO.

Adam and Eve go into Paradise
And I. the guardian angel, stay out-

side.
I must bestir myself. De Guiche will

come.
How shall I hold him here? I must

devise

( The lutes are heard playing a solemn
tune.)

Oh. melody most doleful! Tis the

,nan.

< Retires behind a corner of the house.

tinier DE GUICHE.)

< He mores toward the house, when

CYRANO falls in front of him as if
from a height.)

DE GUICHE.

From whence did this untimely person
fall ?

CYRANO.
From the moon !



GUICHE.
The man is surely mad.

CYRANO.

Away up there I was and now I'm
here.



DE GUICHE.

He is insane. I'll humor him.
friend



My



CYRANO.



\Yhere am I ?



DE GUICHE.



Let me pass !



CYRANO.



Am I in Venice or in Genoa? What
place is this?

DE GUICHE.

Pray, let me pass. A lady waits me
there.



CYRANO.

Ah. then I am in Paris ! That is good'!

DE GUICHE.

The madman has not wholly lost his
wit. (Laughs.)

CYRANO.

Pray, pardon me that I am travel

stained ;
Star dust is in my eyes, and on my

sleeve,
Behold a comet's hair! (Pretends to

blow a hair off his sleeve.}



DE GUICHE.



Sir. I wish



CYRANO.



You wish, monsieur, to know
How I ascended to yon yellow ball.
I might have clad myself in armor

plate.
And then a magnet hurled into the

air
By which I should have soon been

drawn
Aloft.

DE GUICHE.

\Yhy so you might. But was that what
you did ?

CYRANO ( imitating the noise of the
surf and making extravagant
gestures ).

Hoo-ish ! Hoo-ish !

DE GUICHE.
And what is that ?

CYRANO.
Why, can't you tell?

DE GUICHE.



Indeed. I cannot tell.

CYRANO {solemnly).
It is the tide !



24



CYRANO



The tide !



DE GUICHE.



CYRANO.



What time the lady moon doth woo

the deep,

I lay upon the beach as from a bath.
With water of the sea I was all wet,
And when the moon began to draw it

up,
Of course I went. And mark, my head

went first,

Because my hair was fullest of the sea.
And so I rose as would an angel rise
To seek his habitation in the skies.
And after floating up I felt a shock ;
And then



DE GUICHE.



And then?



CYRANO (resuming his natural voice
and manner).

The time is up. Monsieur, you now
are free.

DE GUICHE.
That voice! Then do I dream?

(The door of ROXANE'S house opens
and lackeys appear carrying
candles.)

That nose ! I am awake ! 'Tis Cyrano !

CYRANO.
Cyrano. And they are man and wife.



DE GUICHE.



Who are?



(He turns around and sees behind the
lackeys ROXANE and CHRISTIAN
holding hands, while the MONK
stands smiling beside them. The
DUENNA in a robe de cambre fol-
lows.)

/

DE GUICHE.

You! Roxane! (Bowing to CHRIS-
TIAN.) You, monsieur! (To
CYRANO.) And you!



My compliments, explorer of the

moon !
Your wonders never cease. I do

advise
That for a book you note them

briskly down.

CYRANO.

What you advise is almost a com-
mand. (Boivs low.}

DE GUICHE.

And now, madame, prepare

To bid adieu unto your dearest lord.



What !



ROXANE.



DE GUICHE.



Now my command is starting for the

war;
(To CHRISTIAN.) You will proceed to

join your company.

ROXANE.
To go to war !

DE GUICHE.

Of course. That is the word.

ROXANE.
The Gascony cadets are not to go.



DE GUICHE (taking the order out of
his pocket and handing it to CHRIS-
TIAN).

Oh, yes they are. And here is the
command.

Pray take it to the captain now your-
self.



ROXANE (thrcwing herself
CHRISTIAN'S arms).

Christian !



into



CYRANO



25



DE GUICHE (with a malignant look at
CYRANO).

The wedding night is somewhat far as
yet.

CYRANO.

He thinks that he is giving me great
pain !

CHRISTIAN (embracing ROXANE).
Oh, dearest love, once more.

CYRANO.
Oh, come, 'tis time to start. Enough !



ROXANE (to CYRANO).

And promise me, my ever honest

friend,
That every day a letter he will send.



CYRANO.

Of that be certain,
that.



I will promise



(CYRANO leads CHRISTIAN aivay from
ROXANE, who falls into the arms of
the DUENNA. DE GUICHE stands at
the back triumphantly pointing off,
while the march of the regiment is
heard in the distance.)

Curtain.



26



CYRANO



SCENE I.

LE BRET.

God send they do not wake these

weary one?.
'Tis Cyrano returning from the lines.

SENTRY ( outside).
W 7 ho goes there "'.

CYRANO (outside).
De Bergerac. Be still !

CYRANO climbs up over the embank-
ment at the back and comes down
stage.)

LE BRET.
Thank God ! You are unwounded ?

CYRANO.

Know you not

It is their habit not to hit me?

LE BRET.
Yes ;
But madness 'tis your life thus to

expose

To send a letter for another man.
You do this every day.

CYRANO.

I promised her that he should write,

and I
Will keep that promise with my very

blood.

(CYRANO goes toward a tent.)

LE BRET.
Where go you now?

CYRANO.

To write another one. (He goes into

a tent.)



IV.

( Daybreak has passed into sunrise.
Report of a gun outside. Echoing


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