Copyright
Walter Scott.

The poetical works of Sir Walter Scott, Baronet online

. (page 1 of 78)
Online LibraryWalter ScottThe poetical works of Sir Walter Scott, Baronet → online text (page 1 of 78)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


*




* ~* r T — ^M



:

%


















# ■'■'■ .Hf


















#




















#




















m :




















#




!*""




-■V
















^












jr















¥






m




3 > 3 3



3 a

3 3

3-3



3,3 X 3_




SIR WALTER SCOTT.

From a Painting by Sir H. Raeburn, 1808



THE

^POETICAL WORKS .

OF

SIR WALTER SCOTT

Baronet

EDITED, WITH A CAREFUL REVISION OF THE TEXT

BY

WILLIAM J. ROLFE

A. M., Litt. D.



JDitft Illustration^



BOSTON AND NEW YORK
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

C&e Etoermiic Jgteafit, Cambrttffe

1899



71



Copyright, 1887,
By Ticknor and Company.



All rights reserved.



• • * • • •



PUBLISHERS' NOTE,

The present edition of Scott's Poems was published in 1887 in a
more bulky and expensive form. In reissuing it now in smaller
compass and at a reduced price, the Publishers desire to call attention
to two features which, in their judgment, render the book exception-
ally worthy of attention. The text of the poems represents very
close and careful study on the part of the scrupulous editor, and
may be accepted as the most satisfactory complete text in existence.
The illustrations, executed at the time when the art of wood-engrav-
ing may be said to have reached its culmination in the United States,
are not careless random sketches, evolved for the most part from
the brain of the designer, but are really in the nature of notes to the
poems, since they are for the most part actual studies of Scottish
scenery and life, the artist having visited the localities of the poems
for the purpose of securing somewhat of the same fidelity to nature
which Scott himself aimed at, in his recourse to history and legend.

Boston, February, 1899.



2244611



PREFACE.




The aim in this edition of Scott's Poems
has been to give a correct text, with such
portions of Scott's notes as are likely to be
useful or interesting to the general reader,
and. with fuller and better pictorial illustra-
tions than are to be found in any former
edition. The volume contains all the poems
(not the plays, which are seldom, if ever, read
nowadays, unless as mere literary curiosi-
ties), with the exception of a few bits of
personal or occasional verse which Scott him-
self would never have printed, and which are
not worth preserving. The original contributions to the Border Minstrelsy
are included, except Scott's portion of Thomas the Rhymer (the Third Part
only), which could not well be separated from the rest. Of the Songs
scattered through the novels and plays, the best of such as are compara-
tively independent of the context are given, together with all the poetical
mottoes written by Scott himself for the heading of chapters.

The text of all the editions, English or American, published during the
last fifty years, is more or less corrupt. I do not except that of Lockhart,
who very rarely corrected an error in Scott's editions, while he allowed
many slips made by his own printers to pass undetected. In the prefaces
to the " Students' Edition " of the Lady of the Lake and Marmion, I have
quoted examples of these corruptions, some of which are almost incredibly
bad. Marmion, as I have shown, was never printed correctly until I edited



viii PREFACE.



it, sundry misprints in the first edition having been overlooked by Scott and
by all his commentators and critics. This is the more amazing, inasmuch as
the passages in which the errors occurred became utterly nonsensical.

In carefully collating the text of all the other long poems with that of
the earliest editions I have been able to obtain (I have not always succeeded
in getting hold of the first edition), I have found corruptions quite as bad
as those in the Lady and Marmion. In the minor poems I have met with
comparatively few of these inaccuracies.

The punctuation has been revised throughout, in accordance with the
best recent usage, thousands of the superfluous points with which former
editions are so plentifully besprinkled having been deleted.

In abridging Scott's voluminous notes (they have been merely abridged
without alteration of the portions retained), I have omitted nothing which
the reader who turns to them for explanation or illustration of the text is
likely to miss. That the longer notes have been little read, is evident from
the fact that Lockhart's accidental dropping of a whole page from one in
the Lady in 1833, which destroyed the sense by uniting the fragments of
two independent sentences, was not observed, or at least not pointed out,
until I called attention to it in 1883.

The Glossary contains all the words explained in Scott's shorter notes,
with a few additions of my own.

The engravings may be trusted to speak for themselves. Whether for
beauty or for .accuracy, they may challenge comparison with anything that
has appeared in former editions on either side of the Atlantic.



W. J. R.





Page

THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL i

Introduction 3

Canto First 5

Canto Second ........ ii

Canto Third 21

Canto Fourth 28

Canto Fifth 38

Canto Sixth 48

MARMION 59

Introduction to Canto First. . . 61
To William Stewart Rose, Esq.

Canto First. The Castle .



Introduction to Canto Second . .
To the Rev. John Marriot, a. m.

Canto Second. The Convent . .

Introduction to Canto Third . .
To William Erskine, Esq.

Canto Third. The Hostel, or
Inn

Introduction to Canto Fourth
To James Skene, Esq.

Canto Fourth. The Camp .

Introduction to Canto Fifth
To George Ellis, Esq.

Canto Fifth. The Court .

Introduction to Canto Sixth
To Richard Heber, Esq.

Canto Sixth. The Battle .



64
74

76
86

88
98



"3

128

130











Page


THE LADY OF THE LAKE . .


. 149


Canto First. The Chase . .


• ISI


Canto Second. The Island .


. 169


Canto Third. The Gathering


. 187


Canto Fourth. The Prophecy


203


Canto Fifph. The Combat .


217


Canto Sixth. The Guard-Room


f 2 33


THE VISION OF DON RODERICK


251


Introduction


253


The Vision . .








2.SS


Conclusion . .








266


ROKEBY . . .








271


Canto First









273


Canto Second








282


Canto Third








291


Canto Fourth








301


Canto Fifth








310


Canto Sixth








322


THE BRIDAL OF TRIERMAIN




335


Introduction




337


Canto First .








339


Canto Second








343


Canto Third








• 354


Conclusion . .








364


THE LORD OF THE ISLES






• 365


Canto First






■ 367


Canto Second


. . . .






• 376



CONTENTS.



Page
THE LORD OF THE ISLES.

Canto Third 383

Canto Fourth 391

Canto Fifth 400

Canto Sixth . . 409

Conclusion 420

THE FIELD OF WATERLOO . . 421

The Field of Waterloo .... 423

Conclusion 430

HAROLD THE DAUNTLESS ... 433

Introduction 435

Canto First 436

Canto Second 441

Canto Third 445

Canto Fourth 450

Canto Fifth 454

Canto Sixth 459

Conclusion 464

BALLADS, TRANSLATED OR IMI-
TATED, FROM THE GERMAN, etc. 465

William and Helen 467

The Wild Huntsman 470

The Fire-King 472

Frederick and Alice 475

The Battle of Sempach 475

The Noble Moringer ...... 477

The Erl-King 481

BALLADS 482

V Glenfinlas : or, Lord Ronald's Coro-
nach , . . . . 482

The Eve of Saint John . . . . . 486

Cadyow Castle . 488

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS . . . .492

The Violet 492

To a Lady 492

The Bard's' Incantation 492

Hellvellyn 493

The Dying Bard 494

The Norman Horse-Shoe .... 494

The Maid of Toro 494

The Palmer . . 495



Page
MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

The Maid of Neidpath 495

Wandering Willie 496

Hunting Song 496

Son g 497

The Resolve 497

Epitaph designed for a Monument in
Lichfield Cathedral, at the Burial-
Place of the Family of Miss Seward 498
Prologue to Miss Baillie's Play of
" The Family Legend " .... 498

The Poacher 498

The Bold Dragoon ; or, The Plain of

Badajos 501

On the Massacre of Glencoe . . . 501
Song for the Anniversary Meeting of

the Pitt Club of Scotland .... 502
Lines addressed to Ranald Macdon-

ald, Esq., of Staffa 502

Pharos Loquitur 503

Letters in Verse on the Voyage with
the Commissioners of Northern

Lights 503

Farewell to Mackenzie, High Chief

of Kintail 505

Imitation of the preceding Song . . 506
War- Song of Lachlan, High Chief of

Maclean 506

Saint Cloud 507

The Dance of Death 507

Romance of Dunois 508

The Troubadour 509

From the French 509

Song on the Lifting of the Banner of
the House of Buccleuch, at a great
Foot-Ball Match on Carterhaugh . 509
Tullaby of an Infant Chief .... 511

The Return to Ulster 511

Jock of Hazeldean 512

Pibroch of Donald Dhu 512

Nora's Vow 512

MacGregor's Gathering 513

Verses composed for the Occasion,
adapted to Haydn's Air, " God save
the Emperor Francis," and sung by
a select Band after the Dinner given
by the Lord Provost of Edinburgh
to the Grand Duke Nicholas of
Russia, and his Suite, 19th De-
cember, 1816 513



CONTENTS.



XI



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.



Page



The Search for Happiness ; or, The

Quest of Sultaun Solimaun . . . 514

Lines written for Miss Smith . . . 518
Mr. Kemble's Farewell Address on

taking Leave of the Edinburgh Stage 519

The Sun upon the Weirdlaw Hill . 519

The Monks of Bangor's March . . 510

Epilogue to the Appeal 520

Mackrimmon's Lament 520

Donald Caird 's come again .... 521

Epitaph on Mrs. Erskine 521



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.



Page



On Ettrick Forest's Mountains Dun .

The Maid of Isla

Farewell to the Muse

The Bannatyne Club

Epilogue to the Drama founded on

" Saint Ronan's Well " ....

Epilogue . . . . %

The Death of Keeldar 525

The Foray 526

Inscription for the Monument of the

Rev. George Scott 526



522
522
522
523

524

525



APPENDIX.



JUVENILE LINES 529

From Virgil 529

On a Thunder- Storm 529

On the Setting Sun 529



SONGS FROM THE NOVELS



529






Saint Swithin's Chair 529

Flora Maclvor's Song 530

Twist Ye, Twine Ye 530

Proud Maisie 531

Lucy Ashton's Song 531

Ancient Gaelic Melody ...... 531

The Orphan Maid 531

The Barefooted Friar 532

Rebecca's Hymn 532

Funeral Hymn 532

On Tweed River 533

To the Sub-Prior 533

Border Ballad 533

Claude Halcro's Song ...... 534

Song of Harold Harfager . . . . 534

Song of the Zetland Fisherman . . 534

Cleveland's Songs . 535

County Guy 535

Soldier, Wake ! 535

The Truth of Woman 535

An Hour with Thee 536

The Lay of Poor Louise 536

Song of the Glee-Maiden 536



SONGS FROM THE PLAYS



537



The Sun upon the Lake . . . . . 537

Admire not that I Gained . . . 537

When the Tempest 537

Bonny Dundee 537



SONGS FROM THE PLAYS.

When Friends are Met 538.

Hither we Come 538



FRAGMENTS . . . .

U The Gray Brother . .

Bothwell Castle . . .

The Shepherd's Tale .

Cheviot

The Reiver's Wedding



MOTTOES FROM THE NOVELS

From The Antiquary

" The Black Dwarf ....

" Old Mortality

'• Rob Roy

" The Heart of Mid- Lothian .

" The Bride of Lammermoor

" The Legend of Montrose .

" Ivanhoe .

" The Monastery

" The Abbot

" Kenilworth ......

" The Pirate

" The Fortunes of Nigel . .

" Peveril of the Peak . . .

" Quentin Durward ....

" Saint Ronan's Well . . .

" The Betrothed .....

" The Talisman . . .* . .

" Woodstock

" Chronicles of the Canongate

" The Fair Maid of Perth .

" Anne of Geierstein . . .

" Count Robert of Paris . .

" Castle Dangerous ....



539

539
54o
54o
543

543

545.
545
54 6
547
547
547
548
548
548
549
55'o
55*
552
553
555
556
556
557
557
558
559
559
559
560

56i



Xll



CONTENTS.



NOTES.



Page

The Lay of the Last Minstrel . ... . 565

Marmion 578

The Lady of the Lake 594

The Vision of Don Roderick 602

Rokeby 604

The Bridal of Triermain 612

The Lord of the Isles 615



PAGi

The Field of Waterloo 62;

Harold the Dauntless 624

Ballads from the German, etc 624

Ballads 62C

Miscellaneous Poems 62c

Mottoes from the Novels 632



Glossary 635

Index 641





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



Drawn, engraved, and printed under the supervision of A. V. S. Anthony.



Page
Sir Walter Scott, from a painting by
Sir H. Raeburn, 1808 .... Frontispiece.

Vignette. Portrait of Sir Walter Scott . vii

Tailpiece viii

Headpiece ix

Tailpiece xii

Headpiece xiii

Tailpiece xx

Half Title. The Lay of the Last

Minstrel 1

Vignette. A Harp 2

" The minstrel was infirm and old "... 3

Branksome Turrets 4

" The tables were drawn, it was idlesse all " 5

Naworth Castle 6

" Hung Margaret o'er her slaughtered sire,

And wept in wild despair " 7

The Spirit of the Fell 8

" A fancied moss-trooper, the boy

The truncheon of a spear bestrode " . . 9



Page
" Cliffs which for many a later year

The warbling Doric reed shall hear " . . 11

Melrose Abbey 12

" Again on the knight looked the church- .

man old " 13

LlDDESDALE 14

A Corner in the Abbey 14

Eildon Hills 15

The Secret Nook 16

"The light broke forth so gloriously" . . 17

" Smiled Branksome towers and Teviot's

tide" 18

" The knight and ladye fair are met " . . 19

" The Baron's dwarf his courser held " . . 20

" The meeting of these champions proud

Seemed like the bursting thunder-cloud" . 21

" ' Man of age, thou smitest sore ! ' " . . 23

" The speaker issued from the wood,

And checked his fellow's surly mood " . . 24





xiv LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




Page


Page


" ' I think our work is well begun,




" Was spread the gorgeous festival " . .


50


When we have taken thy father's son ' " .


24


" At unawares he wrought him harm " . .


5i


" E'en the rude watchman on the tower
Enjoyed and blessed the lovely hour " . .


2 5


" Naworth's iron towers "


52


" Fair Margaret, from the turret head,




" And pensive read from tablet eburnine "


53


Heard far below the coursers' tread " . .


27


" Thy pride and sorrow, fair Kirkwall " .


54


u The peel's rude battlement "


29


" Just where the page had flung him down "


55


" They crossed the Liddel at curfew hour,




" With naked foot and sackcloth vest,




And burned my little lonely tower "...


30


And arms enfolded on his breast "...


56


A Gate at Branksome


3i


" The holy fathers, two and two,




" But faster still a cloth-yard shaft




In long procession came "


57


Whistled from startled Tinlinn's yew " . .


32


Branksome


58


* Rides forth the hoary seneschal "...


33


Half Title. Marmion . -


59


44 He ceased — and loud the boy did cry " .


34


Vignette. A Loophole


60


Ruberslaw


35


Headpiece to Introduction ....


61


" The purs ui van t-at-arms again




u Day set on Norham's castled steep " . .


65


Before the castle took his stand "...


36


" Along the bridge Lord Marmion rode " .


66


Kelso Abbey


37


Bosworth Field


67


41 Now squire and knight, from Branksome




" Two pursuivants, whom tabarts deck, . . .




sent"


39


Stood on the steps of stone " . . . .


68


* But yet on Branksome's towers and town,




" A mighty wassail-bowl he took,




In peaceful merriment, sunk down




And crowned it high with wine "...


69


The sun's declining ray "


40










" What time we razed old Ayton tower " .


70


" She gazed upon the inner court "...


41










" And fronted Marmion where he sate " .


73


" He walks through Branksome's hostile








towers"


42


Headpiece to Introduction ....


74


" Himself, the Knight of Deloraine, . . .




Tailpiece to Introduction


76


In armor sheathed from top to toe " . .


43


* Where, from high Whitby's cloistered




The Herald's Trumpet


44


pile"


77


** 'T is done, 't is done ! that fatal blow " .


45


" She sate upon the galley's prow,




" She took fair Margaret by the hand "


46


And seemed to mark the waves below " ,


79


■" Hence, to the field unarmed he ran " . .


47


" Answering from the sandy shore "...


80


" ' I 'd give the lands of Deloraine,




LlNDISFARNE ABBEY


81


Dark Musgrave were alive again ' " . . .


48


" And there she stood so calm and pale " .


83


u The minstrels came, at festive call " . .


49


Tailpiece


85



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



xv



Page
86



Headpiece to Introduction . .

Tailpiece to Introduction 88

I The village inn seemed large, though



rude



" By glen and streamlet winded still,
Where stunted birches hid the rill " . .

" And viewed around the blazing hearth
His followers mix in noisy mirth " . .



89



90



9'



Loch Vennachar 9 2

Dunfermline Abbey 93



" In moonbeam half, and half in gloom,
Stood a tall form with nodding plume "



95



Tailpiece 97

Headpiece to Introduction .... 98

Tailpiece to Introduction ... .100

The Camp 101

" Through Humbie's and through Saltoun's

wood " 102

" Down from his horse did Marmion spring
Soon as he saw the Lion-King " . . . . 103

" Where Crichtoun Castle crowns the bank " 105

" Full on his face the moonbeam strook ! " 107

" Blackford ! on whose uncultured breast . . .

A truant-boy, I sought the nest " . . . .108

" Where the huge Castle holds its state " . 109

Headpiece to Introduction . . . .111

Tailpiece to Introduction 112

Dun Edin 113

" Next, Marmion marked the Celtic race " . 114
" Old Holy-Rood rung merrily "...



'$ The monarch o'er the siren hung,
And beat the measure as she sung " .

" On Derby Hills the paths are steep.
In Ouse and Tvne the fords are deep



15



117



10



" The antique buildings, climbing high

" At night in" secret there they came,
The Palmer and the holy dame " . .

" North Berwick's town and lofty Law

" Then took the squire her rein,
And gently led away her steed " . .

Tailpiece



Headpiece to Introduction . .

Tailpiece to Introduction . .

" Tantallon's dizzy steep
Hung o'er the margin of the deep "

" It chanced a gliding sail she spied "

• Wilton himself before her stood ! "

" The rest were all in Twisel glen "

" The steed along the drawbridge flies
Just as it trembled on the rise " . .

" ' Lord Angus, thou hast lied ! ' " .

" The Till by Twisel Bridge " . .

" ■ Here, by this cross,' he gently said

Flodden Field



" With dying hand above his head
He shook the fragment of his blade,
And shouted ' Victory ! ' " . . .



" There erst was martial Marmion. found

Tailpiece

Vignette. A Broken Harp ....

Half Title. The Lady of the Lake

Vignette

Glenartney

Saint Fillan's Hill

" The wild heaths of Uam-Var " . .

The Brigg of Turk (from the North)

" Boon nature scattered, free and wild,
Each plant or flower, the mountain's child



5S



XVI



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





Page




Page


" In the deep Trosachs' wildest nook " .


I 5 6


Scotch Harebells


»73


[Benvenue, from the Trosachs' road.]












Loch Lomond and Ben Lomond . .


*73


" The rocky summits, split and rent,


v


[From Balloch.]




Formed turret, dome, or battlement " . .


157






[Ben-an, from the Trosachs' road.]




" Bracklinn's thundering wave " . . . .


174


" A narrow inlet, still and deep "...


158


" And, bearing downwards from Glengyle,








Steered full upon the lonely isle "...


175


" And now, to issue from the glen,








No pathway meets the wanderer's ken " .


158


" And near, and nearer as they rowed,








Distinct the martial ditty flowed "...


176


The Lady of the Lake


159


[Brianchoil Point.]




" High on the south, huge Benvenue




Glen Luss


177


Down to the lake in masses threw " . .


160


" With all her joyful female band




[The eastern end of Loch Katrine.]




Had Lady Margaret sought the strand " .


178


" From underneath an aged oak




" And, at her whistle, on her hand




That slanted from the islet rock "...


160 .


The falcon took his favorite stand " . .


179


[The landing at Ellen's Isle. — Loch Katrine


]










Inchmahone Island, Lake Menteith


180


" In listening mood, she seemed to stand,








The guardian Naiad of the strand " . .


l6l


" ' Short be my speech ; — nor time affords,








Nor my plain temper, glozing words ' " .


181


" His stately mien as well implied








A high-born heart, a martial pride " . .


162


"' Hear my blunt speech: grant me this
maid




" This lake's romantic strand "•• . . .


163


To wife, thy counsel to mine aid ' " . . .


182


[The Silver Strand. — Loch Katrine.]




" With stalwart grasp his hand he laid




" He crossed the threshold, — and a clang




On Malcolm's breast and belted plaid " .


183


Of angry steel that instant rang "...


164










" Young Malcolm answered, calm and bold"


184


" Dame Margaret heard with silence grave "


165










" Then plunged he in the flashing tide " .


185


" For all around, the walls to grace,








Hung trophies of the fight or chase " . .


166


Benvenue. — From Ellen's Isle ....


186


" The hall was cleared, — the stranger's bed




" The gray mist left the mountain-side " .


187


Was there of mountain heather spread " .


167


[Benvenue, from the Silver Strand.]




" At length, with Ellen in a grove




" Brian the Hermit by it stood " . . . .


188


He seemed to walk and speak of love " .


168


" All night, in this sad glen, the maid




Tailpiece. Bagpipes .......


168


Sat shrouded in her mantle's shade " . .


189


Ellen's Isle


169


" ' Woe to the clansman who shall view




" Upon a rock with lichens wild,




This symbol of sepulchral yew ' " ... .


190


Beside him Ellen sat and smiled "...


170


" Ben-an's gray scalp the accents knew "
[Ben-an, from Loch Katrine.]


I 9 I


" He parts, — the maid, unconscious still,






Watched him wind slowly round the hill "


171


" And the gray pass where birches wave








On Beala-nam-bo "


192


" Soothing she answered him : ' Assuage,








Mine honored friend, the fears of age ' " .


172


" ' Speed, Malise, speed ! ' "


193



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



xvn



" Duncraggan's huts appear at last " . .

u All stand aghast : — unheeding all,
The henchman bursts into the hall " . .

" Swoln was the stream, remote the
bridge"

In Leny Pass

Ruins of the Chapel of Saint Bride

Loch Lubnaig

The Braes of Balquidder ....

Loch Voil

Loch Con

" And called the grot the Goblin Cave " .

Lanrick Heights

[From Lanrick Mead.]



Loch Vennachar . .
[From Bochastle Hill.]



Page
194

195

r 95
196
197
198
199
200
20I
201
202

203



Up Glenfinlas 204



I ' But see, who comes his news to show !
Malise ! what tidings of the foe ? '" . .



Ruins of Doune Castle . .
[From the Ardoch.]

I * Sooth was my prophecy of fear ;
Believe it when it augurs cheer ' "



Singing Birds



" \ Ellen, thy hand — the ring is thine ;
Each guard and usher knows the sign ' " .

Old Bridge between Loch Achray
and Loch Vennachar

" Now wound the path its dizzy ledge
Around a precipice's edge " . . . . .



" ' Stranger, it is in vain ! ' she cried " .

" With cautious step and ear awake,
He climbs the crag and threads the brake

" Till, as a rock's huge point he turned,
A watch-fire close before him burned "



Tailpiece. A Harp



205
206



207
208

209



212
213

214

21S
216



Page



"At length they came where, stern and

steep,
The hill sinks down upon the deep " . .
[The road between Duncraggan and Lanrick.



Doune Castle

[From the River Teith.]

The Old Bridge at Callander . .

" ' Come one, come all ! this rock shall fly
From its firm base as soon as I ' " . . .



217



218



" On Bochastle the mouldering lines "

" ' For this is Coilantogle ford,

And thou must keep thee with thy sword ' "

Coilantogle Ford

" 111 fared it then with Roderick Dhu " .

" Unbonneted, and by the wave

Sat down his brow and hands to lave " .



Torry . .
Deanstown



" Gray Stirling, with her towers and town,
Upon their fleet career looked down " . .

The Gate. — Stirling Castle

Ladies' Rock. — Stirling Castle . . .

" Needs but a buffet and no more " . .

Tailpiece

"Through narrow loop and casement

barred,
The sunbeams sought the Court of Guard "

" At length up started John of Brent " .

" Boldly she spoke : ' Soldiers, attend ! ' "

" She bade her slender purse be shared " .

Entrance to Roderick Dhu's Dun-
• geon

" * Who fought ? — who fled ? — Old man,
be brief"

" Where shall he find, in foreign land,
So lone a lake, so sweet a strand I " . .



Online LibraryWalter ScottThe poetical works of Sir Walter Scott, Baronet → online text (page 1 of 78)