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Ward-Belmont School (1913-1951).

Annual Catalog and Announcement. The Ward-Belmont School, 1946-1947 / 1947-1948 (1946, September). (Volume 1946, September) online

. (page 2 of 8)
Online LibraryWard-Belmont School (1913-1951)Annual Catalog and Announcement. The Ward-Belmont School, 1946-1947 / 1947-1948 (1946, September). (Volume 1946, September) → online text (page 2 of 8)
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History

Baylor University, B.A.; University of Texas, M.A.; University of Mexico

Janet Cleveland

English

Cumberland University, B.A.; George Peabody College for Teachers, MA.

Whitfield Cobb, Jtjnior

Mathematics

University of North Carolina, A.B., A.M., University of Michigan

Sydney Dalton

Head of Voice Department

Dominion College of Music, Montreal, L.Mus.; Cincinnati Conservatory

of Music, M.Mus.; Student of David Bispham, Max Heinrich

and J. H. Duval; Piano with Rafael Joseffy; Composition

with Rubin Goldmark and Frederick Schlieder



WARD-BELMONT

(18)

MAtrsmE Collier Daniel

Home Economics and Physiology

Union University, BA.; George Peabody College for Teachers

Thomas B. Donner
Spanish

East Texas Teachers College, B.A.; Southern Methodist University, M.A.;
George Peabody College for Teachers

Polly Fessey

Comm,ercial Law

Vanderbilt University, B.A.

Mary Louise Givens

Modern Languages

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A.; University of Wisconsin, M.A.;

Ph.D.; Certificat d'Etudes Francaises, University of Besancon;

University of Paris; University of Chicago

LomsE Gordon

Art

Graduate of the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts; Kansas Cily

Art Institute; University of Colorado

Louise Green
French and Spanish

Belhaven College, B.A.; George Peabody College for Teachers, MA.;
University of Wisconsin; Southwestern University

Edna King Guild
Latin

Vanderbilt University, BA.; George Peabody College for Teachers, MA.

Margaret Shannon Harber

Physical Education

Southern Methodist University, B.S.

Harryette Harlan

Biology

VcinderbUt University, B.A.

Helen K. Haughton

Art History

Ruskin School of Art, Oxford, England; Slade School, University of

London; University of Chicago, A.B.; Columbia University;

Art Institute of Chicago.

Vera Luzene Hay

History *

University of Chicago, Ph.B.; Vanderbilt University, MA.; Harvard
University; Colvimbia University; George Peabody College
for Teachers; University of Minnesota



WARD-BELMONT
(19)

Cora Henderson

Secretarial Training

Southern College, B.A.; George Peabody College for Teachers, M.A.

Frederick Arthur Henkel

Head of Organ Department

Graduate,' MetropoUtan College of Music, Cincinnati; Cincinnati College

of Music; Student of Steinbrecher, Andre, Sterling,

Durst, and Grainger

Alma Hollinger

Biology

University of Michigan, B.A. M.A.; Michigan Biological Station; Marine

Biological Station, Venice, California

Alan Irwin

Piano

Bush Conservatory, B.Mus.; Juilliard Scholarship, two years; University

of Chicago, Ph.B.; Piano student of John Blackmore, Josef

Lhevinne, Edwin Hughes; Organ student of Arthur

Dunham, Raymond Robinson, Carl Weinrich

Florence Irwin
Piano
Bush Conservatory of Music, B.M., M.M.; Ward-Belmont School; Rock-
ford College; Student of John Blackmore, Frederic Lamond,
Edwin Hughes; Teachers' College, Columbia University;
Juilliard School of Music

Nanna Eugenia Jones
Physical Education

Graduate, Chalif School of Dancing

Billie Kuykendall
English

Tennessee College, B.S.; George Peabody College for Teachers, M.A.

Martha Meredith Lee
Secretarial Studies

Murfreesboro State Teachers College, B.S.; George Peabody College for

Teachers, MA.

Barbara McCain
Physical Education

University of Iowa, B.S.

Mary Cornelia Malone
Voice

Ward's Seminary; Student of Mme. Marcella Sembrich, Frank La Forge,
and Mme. Eleanora de Cisneros, Milan, Italy



WARD-BELMONT
(20) ■

Ruth M. Mann

Mathematics

University of Wisconsin, B.S.

Florence Renich Mathias

Chemistry

University of Wisconsin, B.S.; University of Chicago

Nellie Pyt^e Miser

Mathem,atics

Huron College, B.A.; University of Chicago

Katherine Blanc Mitchell

French and Spanish

Centre College, A.B.; University of Illinois, M.A.; University of Wisconsin

Catherine E. Morrison

Director, Department of Physical Education

Posse School of Physical Education; Emerson College of Oratory; Gilbert

School of Dancing, George Peabody College for Teachers;

Columbia University

John Albert Morrow
Chemistry

Emory and Henry College, B.A.; University of Virginia, M.A.;
University of Florida, Ph.D.

IvAR Lou Myhr
English

Vanderbilt University, B.A., Ph.D.; George Peabody College for Teachers,

M.A.; Oxford University and Cambridge University,

England; Yale University.

Mary Margaret Neal
Chemistry

Northwestern University, B.S.

Camilla Nance Newerf
Physical Education

Sargent School of Boston University, B.S.

Margaret Elizabeth Newhall

Library

Vassar College, B.A.; Ohio State University, M.A., B.S.; George Peabody

College for Teachers, B.S. in L.S.



WARD-BELMONT
(a)

Mary Rachel Norris
Psychology and Education

Bryn Mawr College, B.A., M.A.; George Peabody College for Teachers;
Columbia University

Anne Knott Ordway
English

University of Chicago, Ph.B.; Vanderbilt University, M.A.

Martha Knott Ordway
English

University of Chicago, Ph.B.; George Peabody College for Teachers, M.A.

Margaret Henry Ottarson
Latin

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A.; University of Rome, Italy, M.A.;

the American, British, Italian, and French Academies, Athens,

Greece, and the Sorbonne, Paris; Vanderbilt University

Frances Helen Parker
Harp

Birmingham Southern College, B.A.; Vanderbilt University, M.A.; East-
man School of Music; Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; Student
of Carlos Salzedo; private lessons in Vienna

Georgia Taylor Parks
Library

Tennessee College for Women, B.A.; George Peabody College for
Teachers, B.S. in L.S.

Lucy Isabel Parnell
Biology

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A.

Alma Wilson Phillips
Spanish

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.S., M.A.; University of Paris;
University of Mexico; University of Geneva; McGill University

Mary McMillan Rasmussen
English

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.S.; University of Bern,
Switzerland

Marilyn Redinger
Voice

Butler University and Arthur Jordan Conservatory, B.M.; Ward-Belmont

School; Student of Sydney Dalton, Joseph Lautner, coaching

with Charles Hedley



WARD-BELMONT
(22)^ —

Lawrence H. Riggs
Head of Music Theory Department

Beloit College, B,A.; Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, England;

Chicago Musical College, Northwestern. University School of

Music; American Institute of Normal Methods

Hazel Coate Rose
Piano

Student of William Sherwood, Glerm Dillard Gunn, and Victor Heinze;
Organ with Arthur Dunham; Harmony with Clarence Dickinson

Kenneth Rose
Head of Violin Department

Formerly Teacher in Metropolitan School of Music, Indianapolis; Concert

Master, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra; Student of McGibeny,

Indianapolis; Arthur Hartmann, Paris; George

Lehmann, Berlin; Suky, Prague

Jean Ryder
Physical Education

Sargent School of Boston University, B.S.

Laurine Forrester Sargent
Home Economics

University of Tennessee, B.S.; George Peabody College for Teachers,
M.A.; Vanderbilt University

Grace Schneck
Music Theory

American Conservatory of Music, B.Mus., M.Mus.; Mills College; Theory

and Composition with Leo Sowerby, Stella Roberts, and

Darius Milhaud

Jane Sefton
Piano

Ward-Belmont Conservatory; University of Michigan, B.M.; Juilliard
School of Music; Columbia University

Mary Wynne Shackelford
Director, Department of Art

Art Academy of Cincinnati; University of Cincinnati, B.S.; Pratt Insti-
tute, School of Fine and Applied Arts; School of Fine and
Applied Arts, New York and Paris, B.F.A.

Pauline Lacy Smith

English

University of Kentucky, A.B.; University of Chicago, M.A.; George

Peabody College for Teachers



WARD-BELMONT
_ (23)

Nancy Lunsford Sutherland

Art

Diploma in Art, Ward-Belmont School; Certificate, Boothbay Studios;

Student of Frank Leonard Allen



Amelie Throne

Piano

Farrar School of Voice and Piano, Nashville, Tennessee; Student of

Maurice Aronson, Vienna; Josef Lhevinne, Berlin; Sigismxmd

Stojowsky, New York; Master Class of Harold

Bauer, New York



Ethel Winborn Turner

Mathematics

Vanderbilt University, B.A.



Emily Barry Walker

Biology

Western Kentucky State Teachers College; George Peabody College for

Teachers, B.S., M.A.; Vanderbilt University Medical School



Frances Cannon Walker

Home Econom,ics

Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; University of Tennessee, B.S.



Elizabeth Wall

Piano

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.S.; Nashville Conservatory of

Music, B.Mus.; Student of Wiktor Labunski, Eduard

Loessel, Roy Underwood



Susanna Wilder

Sociology and Bible

Smith College, B.A.; Yale University, M.A.



Catherine Winnia

Director, Department of Speech.

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.S.; Columbia University, M.A.;

Director's and Teacher's Certificate, American Academy

of Dramatic Art



WARD-BELMONT
(24)

THE JUNIOR COLLEGE

Admission. — ^Kitrance to the Junior College is selective,
and the Committee on Admissions chooses candidates on the
basis of their school records and general fitness for advanced
work. This is necessarily the case because most of our gradu-
ates pursue their studies in universities and leading women's
colleges. Application is usually made well in advance of the
time the student plans to enter. Admission to the freshman
class is based upon graduation from, an approved secondary
school, with a minimum of fifteen acceptable units. These
should be distributed principally in the fields of English, for-
eign language, history, social sciences, mathematics, and sci-
ence. Various informal tests that require no special prepara-
tion, and an English sectioning test, are given at the opening of
school so that each student may be properly placed and guided.

A student may pursue three possible programs of study:
(1) Senior College Preparatory Curriculum (pp. 26-28), (2)
Terminal Curriculum (p. 29) , (3) Special Curricula (pp. 30-
34) . For those who plan to do advanced work following their
two years of junior college at Ward-Behnont courses of study
are designed to meet the requirements of the particular senior
colleges and universities they are to attend. Such work is fuUy
transferable.

The work in the Terminal Curriculum is identical with that
in the Senior College Curriculum. The only difference is
that the students who follow this program may select more
electives in keeping with their special needs and interests.

The Special Curricula Programs offer carefully planned
courses of study in art, dancing, foods and nutrition, textiles
and clothing, music, speech, and secretarial training and lead
to diplomas and certificates in these fields.

Advanced Standing. — Advanced standing is granted for
work at approved colleges. The amount of credit allowed will
not exceed thirty-two semester hours, including physical edu-
cation. Credit is not given for courses specifically required
for graduation at Ward-Belmont unless the transferred work
is the equivalent of the classes here.



WARD-BELMONT
. (25)

College credit is not allowed for high school work in excess
of those units necessary for college entrance.

Course of Study. — The minimum requirements for all resi-
dent students consist of twenty-six semester hours a year,
including the following courses:



First Year




Second Year




English 1, 2


6 hoiirs


Physical Education 15, 16


1 hour


Physical Education


2 hoiirs


Physical Education


1 hoxir



Students who present transferred credit in EngHsh or Physi-
cal Education 15,16 (Hygiene) must substitute other courses
to meet the minimum schedule requirements.

All students carry a minimum of three hours a week in
the physical education department each year.

Grades and Reports. — The following grading system is
used: A, excellent; B, good; C, satisfactory; D, passing; E,
condition; F, failure; I, incomplete. Semester examinations
are given in every course in accordance with the schedule
issued. A semester grade of E or I must be removed at the
beginning of the succeeding semester. If such a grade is not
thus removed at the time set, it automatically becomes an F.
When a mark of E is removed, the recorded grade may not be
higher than a D. The only way in which an F can be removed
is by repeating the coxirse.

In order to receive credit, all required work other than the
final examination itself must be completed by the beginning
of final examination week.

Preliminary reports showing progress and standing of stu-
dents are sent parents at the middle of each semester. Final
semester reports are mailed at the end of the semester.

Quality Credits. — For each semester hour of credit com-
pleted with a grade of A, three quality credits are assigned;
with a grade of B, two quality credits; with a grade of C, one
quality credit. Lower grades yield no quality credits. Qual-
ity credits are not allowed for the four semester hours of
required physical education.

Diplomas and Certificates. — Diplomas are conferred in the
Senior College Preparatory Curriculum (p. 26) , the Terminal
Curriculum (p. 29) , in the special fields of Art (p. 30) , Danc-
ing (p. 30), Foods and Nutrition (p. 31), Textiles and Clothing



WARD-BELMONT

(26)

(p. 31), Music (p. 74), and Speech (p. 31). Certificates are
given in Art (p. 32), Dancing (p. 32), Music (p. 74), Riding
(p. 33) , Secretarial Training (p. 33) , and Speech (pp. 33-34) .
An appHcant for any of these awards must complete at least
one full year's work at Ward-Belmont and earn a total number
of quality credits equal to the required number of semester
hours. AppHcants for a special diploma or certificate must
make at least B in the major subject.

Well-established habits of correct speaking and writing must
be demonstrated. Any applicant for a diploma or for a cer-
tificate whose oral or written English is at any time unsatis-
factory is reported to the Dean's Committee on Oral and
Written English. The committee holds conferences with the
student and provides her with opportunities for remedial work
so that her speaking and writing habits may be changed to
meet the standards.

Senior College Preparatory Curriculum

Students who wish to enter one of the suggested senior col-
lege preparatory programs below must present for entrance
the following specific units:



English


3 xxnits


Geometry


1 unit


Algebra


1 unit


One foreign language


2 units




Electives


8 units





More than four units in vocational and special subjects, or
fewer than two units in a foreign language, may not be in-
cluded in the elective units accepted.

It is sometimes possible for applicants whose high school
credits do not include all of the units specified above to make
up the deficiency by carrying work in the preparatory depart-
ment or by counting back college work at the ratio of four
semester hours for one high school unit.

Only eighteen semester hours from the special departments
of art, music, home economics, secretarial training, and from
the elective courses of the physical education department, may
be credited toward this diploma. In music not more than
eight semester hours in applied music may be so credited. In
order to receive academic credit, applied music must be studied
in conjunction with music history or theory.



THE



JUNIOR



COLLEGE
^ (27)



(1) GENERAL LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES



FiHST Year
English 1, 2 6 hours

Foreign Language 6 or 8 hours
♦History 6 hotirs

Electives 10 to 12 hovurs

Physical Education 1, 2 2 hours



Second Year
English 21, 22 6 hours

Foreign Language or 6 hours
♦Science 8 hours

Electives 10 to 16 hoiu:s

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour



Students presenting only two units of a foreign language
from high school are required to take one foreign language
for two years in college. Students presenting three or four
units in one foreign language may satisfy the language require-
ment by taking the language presented for entrance for one
year or by taking another language for two years. Those pre-
senting two units in each of two languages are required to
continue for a year one of the languages presented for entrance
or to take a third language for two years.



(2) PRE-BUSINESS



First Year
English 1, 2
Economics 3. 4
Mathematics 11. 12
Speech 11, 12
Elective
Physical Education 1, 2



6 hours
6 hours
6 hours
6 hours
6 hours
2 hours



6 hours
6 hours
3 hovurs
6 hours



Second Year

English 21, 22
Economics 21, 22
History 23 or 24
Psychology 21, 22
Biology 11, 12 or Chemistry

11^ 12 8 hours

Electives 1 hour

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hotu:



'^






s/l



%,.



h



(3) PRE-JOURNALISM



First Year
English 1, 2 6 hours

Biology 11, 12 or Chemistry

11, 12 8 hours

Foreign Language 6 or 8 hours
History 1, 2 or 11, 12 6 hours

Elective 6 hours

Physical Education 1, 2 2 hours



Second Year
English 21, 22 6 hours

English 27; 28 6 hours

fForeign Language or 6 hours
JElectives 18 or 12 hours

Physical .Education 15, 16 1 horn-
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour



•The order in which these courses are taken may be reversed.

tSee explanation of foreign language requirement for General Liberal Arts and
Science Program above. .

JFrom such as : art history, economics, political science, psychology, religion.



V



WAR


D


- B E L M O


N T


(2fl)








\Moy




(4) PRE-MEDICAL




First Year


Second Year




English 1, 2




6 hours English 21, 22


6 hours


Mathematics 11. 12




6 hours Chemistry 21, 22


10 hours


French or German


6


or 8 hours Biology 11, 12


8 hours


Chemistry 11, 12




8 hours French or German


6 hovirs


Elective


3 to 6 hours Physical Education 15, 16


1 hovir


Physical Education 1, 2


2 hours Physical Education 21, 22


1 hour




(5)


PRE-PHYSICAL EDUCATION





Adjustments may be made in the program of the individual
student in order to meet the specific requirements of the senior
college which she plans to attend.



Second Year
English 21, 22
Physiology 11, 12
Elective

Physical Education 15, 16
Physical Education 23. 24
Physical Education 27, 28
:iAL WORK

Second Year
English 21, 22
Chemistry 11, 12

or
Physiology 11, 12
Sociology 21. 22

or
Political Science 27, 28
Electives 8 to 12 hours

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour
(7) LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE AND MUSIC

Students may combine work in the Senior College Cur-
riculum and in the conservatory in such a way as to earn both
the general diploma and a music certificate (see p. 74 ff .) in two
years. Such a program enables a student to carry on her
music education with her general college work. Students who
choose this program should be sure that it meets the transfer
requirements of their senior college.



First Year




English 1, 2


6 hours


Biology 11, 12


8 hours


Electives


14 hours


Physical Education 17, 18 6 hours




(6) PRE-S


First Year




English 1, 2


6 hoturs


History 1, 2


6 hours


Biology 11, 12


8 hours


Economics 3. 4


6 hours


Elective 4


or 6 hours


Physical Education 1, 2


2 hours



6 hours
6 hours
6 hours
1 hour
6 hours
6 hours



6 hours
8 hours

6 hours
6 hours

6 hours



First Year




Second Year




English 1, 2


6 hours


English 21, 22




6 hoirxrs


Foreign Language 6


or 8 hours


Foreign Language




6 hours


Science


8 hours


History




6 hours


Music History 15, 16


6 hours


Music Theory 11, 14




10 hours


Applied Music 4


or 5 hours


Applied Music


4 to 7 hours


Academic Elective


3 hours


Academic Elective


to 3 hours


Physical Education 1, 2


2 hours


Physical Education 15,


,16


1 hour



THE



JUNIOR



COLLEGE
(29)



Terminal Curriculum

To recognize and provide for the needs of students who do
not expect to attend a senior college upon graduation, the
following terminal curriculum is suggested. The dean assists
each student in choosing electives in keeping with her inter-
ests and previous preparation.

The entrance requirement is graduation from an approved
secondary school, with a minimum of fifteen acceptable imits.
Each student must complete the following basic courses:



First Year
English 1, 2 6 hours

•History or Social Science 6 hours
Electives 18 hours

Physical Education 1, 2 2 hours



The continuation course is
course taken the first year and
is a prerequisite. The student
following continuation courses:

Art 13, 14 or 15, 16 or 17, 18

Biology 21. 22

Chemistry 21, 22 or 23, 24

English 27; 28

French 13, 14 or 19, 20 or 23, 24

German 13, 14 or 21, 22

Home Economics 21. 22 or 23, 24

Latin 3, 4 or 11, 12 or 21. 22



Second Year
English 21, 22 or 23. 24

or 25. 26 6 hoiirs

*Laboratory Science 6 or 8 hours
A continuation course 6 hours

Electives 10 or 12 hours

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour

a subject which continues a

for which the first-year course

is offered a choice among the

Mathematics 21, 22

Music 21; 24

Phys. Education 27, 28

Phys. Education 31, 32

Secretarial Training 11, 12 or 15, 16

Spanish 13, 14 or 21, 22

Speech 13 and either 14 or 22



Terminal Curriculum and Music
A student may combine work in the Terminal Curriculum
and in the conservatory in such a way as to earn both the
general jimior college diploma and a music certificate (see
p. 74 ff.) in two years.



First Year
English 1, 2

*History or Social Science
Music History 15, 16
Applied Music 4 or

Electives 6 or 9 hours

Physical Education 1, 2 2 hours



6 hours
6 hours
6 hotirs
5 hours



Second Year
English 21, 22 or 23, 24

or 25. 26 6 hoiirs

♦Laboratory Science 6 or 8 hours
Music Theory 11, 14 10 hours

A Continuation Course 6 hoiirs
Applied Music 4 to 7 hours

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour



*The order in which these courses are taken may be reversed.



w

(30)-



R



B E



M O N



Special Curricula for Diplomas



Art



Art 11, 12

Art History 13; 14

English 1, 2

French

Elective



First Year

8 or 12 hours

6 hoxirs

6 hotirs

6 or 8 hours

to 4 hours



6 hours

6 hours
6 hours



Physical Education 1, 2 2 hoiirs



Second Year
Art 13, 14 or 15, 16

or 17, 18
English 21, 22 or 23. 24

or 25, 26
French
Education 11, 12 or Psychology

21, 22 6 hours

Elective 4 to 6 hours

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour
Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour



A minimum of twenty-four problems are required. Addi-
tional problems to strengthen the work of the student in
particular fields may be assigned.

The progress of each student is an individual matter. Some
students will be able to complete problems in less time than
is required for others. Completion of syllabus requirements
— ^not number of hours in the studio — ^will determine the
awarding of the diploma.

Dancing



First Year



English 1, 2

♦French 11, 12

Music 15; 16

Art History 13; 14

Art 3, 4

Physical Education 15, 16

Physical Education 11, 12



6 hours
8 hours
6 hours
6 hours
4 hours
1 hour
4 hours



Second Year



English 21, 22 or 23. 24 or 25. 26

Psychology 21, 22

Home Economics 25

Physical Education 23. 24

Physical Education 31, 32 (B, D, E, F, G and lecture work)

Physical Education 35, 36



hotirs
hours
hours
hotirs
hotirs
hours



The appHcant for the diploma in dancing must give a credit-
able progi'am of dances, two of whidh must be her own com-
positions. The costumes are to be designed by her.



*Two years of French in high school meet this requirement.



THE



JUNIOR



COLLEGE
(31)



Home Economics

A student who expects to transfer to senior college for con-
tinued work in home economics should offer the units listed
for entrance to the Senior College Preparatory Curricula,
page 26.

(1) FOODS AND NUTRITION



First Year
Home Economics 11; 12
Home Economics 17;

13; 14
Chemistry 11, 12
English 1, 2
Eiectives



6 hoxirs

18 or

4 or 6 hours
8 hours
6 hours

4 or 6 hours



Physical Education 1, 2 2 hours



Second Yeah

Chemistry 23, 24 8 hoturs

Home Economics 21. 22 6 hours

Economics 21, 22 6 hours

Physiology 11, 12 6 hours

♦Eiectives 4 hours

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hovir

Physical Education 21, 22 1 hour



(2) TEXTILES AND CLOTHING



First Year

Home Economics 13; 14 6 hours
Home Economics 15; 16 or

il; 12 4 or 6 hours

Art 3, 4 4 hours

Chemistry 11, 12 8 hours

English 1, 2 6 hours

Physical Education 1, 2 2 hotirs



Second Year

Home Economics 23, 24 6 hours


2 4 5 6 7 8

Online LibraryWard-Belmont School (1913-1951)Annual Catalog and Announcement. The Ward-Belmont School, 1946-1947 / 1947-1948 (1946, September). (Volume 1946, September) → online text (page 2 of 8)