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Ward-Belmont School (1913-1951).

Annual Catalog and Announcement. The Ward-Belmont School for Young Women, 1934-1935 (1933, December). (Volume 1933, December) online

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uses. This group of materials covers all fabrics used in the home. Practical
home tests for differentiation in fabric content are discussed.

In the laboratory advanced problems in garment construction, pattern altera-
tion, and elementary pattern construction are carried on.
Prerequisites: Home Economics 13; 14, or equivalent.
Six hours a week, lecture and laboratory.
First semester. Credit, three semester hours.

24. Textile Economics and Advanced Clothing Construction. The lectures in-
clude a study of the economic conditions affecting the history of the textile in-
dustry and the clothing industry from the standpoint of the industry itself, the
workers and the consumers; style and fashion, and the economic factors affect-
ing them; job analysis of different types of careers open to students of Textiles
and Clothing.

Laboratory problems include advanced work in clothing construction and pat-
tern study.

Prerequisite: Home Economics 23.

Six hours a week, lecture and laboratory.

Second Semester. Credit, three semester hours.



LATIN

MISS CASON

One of the chief aims of this department is to assist the student in acquiring
a background of classical culture which will enrich her future attainments in
whatever field she may choose for specialization. An effort is made to stimulate
interest through extensive collateral readings, through illustrative material in art
and archaeology, and through a conscientious investigation of the facts of
Roman life and literature. The student is taught, as far as the opportunity is
afforded, to appreciate the debt of the modern world to Rome and, through
Rome, to Greece.

I. Cicero. Reading of not less than four orations (or an equivalent amount in
a text like Ullman and Henry's Third Year Latin Book); oral and written compo-
sition; sight reading.

Prerequisite: Two units of high school Latin.

Four hours a week.

First semester. Credit, four semester hours.



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4. Vergil. Reading of not less than four books of the Aeneid. A study will be
made of the entire poem. Extensive collateral readings; oral and written com-
position; sight reading.

Prerequisite: Three units of high school Latin, or Latin I or the equivalent.

Four hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, four semester hours.

11. Cicero: De Senectute, Tusculanae Disputationes I. Syntax reviews; practise
in the writing of Latin; collateral readings; a study of the philosophical thought
of the ancients, with especial attention to Stoicism and Epicureanism.

Prerequisite: Four units of high school Latin, or Latin 4 or the equivalent.

Three hours a week.

First semester. Credit, three semester hours.

12. Selections from Larin Prose and Poetry. A text with this title, edited
by Harrington and Scott, will be used for this course. While illustrative selec-
tions from several authors will be translated, attention will be given chiefly to
Catullus, Horace, and Livy. Syntax reviews; practice in the writing of Latin;
collateral readings.

Prerequisite: Four units of high school Latin, or Latin 4 or the equivalent.

Three hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.

13. 14. Latin Writing. The purpose of this course is to develop syntactical ac-
curacy, good diction, and an appreciation of the difference between English
idiom and Latin idiom. Students who expect to major in Latin are urged to take
the course.

Prerequisite: Four units of high school Latin, or Latin 4 or the equivalent.

One hour a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, two semester hours.

15; 16. Classical Mythology. The most important myths are studied, with
especial reference to their use in ancient and modern literature and art. While
attention will be concentrated chiefly on Greek and Roman mythology, some
time will be devoted to the myths of other countries. A knowledge of Latin,
while helpful, is not necessary. Open to all students of college grade.

Two hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, four semester hours.

21. a. Roman Comedy. Selected plays from Plautus and Terence. Three plays
will be read carefully; others will be taken rapidly or in translations. Collateral
readings.

b. Pliny. Selected letters. Collateral readings.

Prerequisite: Latin II. 12 or the equivalent.

Three hours a week.

First semester. Credit, three semester hours.



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22. Roman Tragedy. Three of Seneca's tragedies will be read in Latin; others
will be taken in translations. Comparison with the Greek originals. Attention
to Seneca's influence on European tragedy. Collateral readings.

Three hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.



LIBRARY METHODS

MISS CHURCH MISS HUME

A course in the use of books and libraries is required of all first-year students
during the first semester. If the work is not passed satisfactorily the course must
be repeated. This course is designed to give facility in the use of books and
libraries. The work consists of lessons on the use of the card catalog, ency-
clopedias, dictionaries, and general reference tools, with some practise in note-
taking and the making of bibliographies.

One hour a week.

First semester. Credit, one semester hour.



MATHEMATICS

MISS EWINS MR. ROBINS MRS. SHACKLEFORD

I. College Algebra. A general review is made of all topics usually covered in
a second-year high school course in addition to all topics offered in Mathematics
II.

Prerequisites: Algebra, 1 unit; Geometry, I unit.

Five hours a week.

First semester. Credit, three semester hours.

I I. College Algebra. A general review Is followed by a study of exponents,
radicals, quadratic equations, simultaneous quadratic equations, inequalities, bi-
nomial theorem, progressions, complex numbers, theory of equations, and deter-
minants.

Prerequisites: Algebra, I '/2 units; Geometry, I unit.

Three hours a week.

First semester. Credit, three semester hours.

12. Plane Trigonometry. The work consists of trigonometric functions and for-
mulae, theory and use of tables, solution of right and oblique triangles (with
applications to problems of Physics and Surveying), inverse functions, trigo-
nometric equations.

Prerequisite: Mathematics I or I I or the equivalent.

Three hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.

21, Analytic Geometry. Graphical representation of points and curves in a
plane, determination of the properties and relations of plane curves by a study



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of their equations and graphs. The straight line and the conic sections are fully
investigated.

Prerequisite: Mathematics II. 12 or its equivalent.

Three hours a week.

First sennester. Credit, three semester hours.

22. Differential Calculus. Beginners' Course. Methods of differentiation, with
the usual geometric and physical applications. Problems of maxima and minima,
etc.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21.

Three hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.



MUSIC

MR. RIGSS

15; 16. History and Appreciation of Music. A general survey of the develop-
ment of music from the earliest times to the present day. Music prior to the
seventeenth century is studied as background for a fuller consideration of the
epoch of instrumental polyphony, the Classic and Romantic Periods, and the
Modern Era. Text, reference reading, lectures, critical and creative listening to
many illustrations on the Victrola and Duo-Art reproducing piano. There is no
fee for this course.

Music 15 is a prerequisite for Music 16.

Three hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.

25, 26. Advanced History and Appreciation of Music. A critical and apprecia-
tive study of various types of music: opera, oratorio, symphonic and chamber
music, the repertory for solo instruments and voice. Particular attention is
given to works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Copious illustrations
on Victrola and Duo-Art reproducing piano; study of programs of visiting art-
ists; reference reading and reports. There is no fee for this course.

Prerequisite: Music 15, 16.

Two hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, four semester hours.

For descriptions of all courses offered in Music, see pages 69-81.



PHYSICAL EDUCATION

MISS MORRISON, Director

MISS CARLING MISS GOODRICH MISS CAYCE

MISS JETER MISS SMITH

The value of Physical Education, both morally and ethically, the
training of the body for utility and grace, and the Intelligent care
of It for protection against weakness and disease, nnake the School



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of Physical Education one of greatest importance. Every effort has
been made to make the equipment and management as complete
as possible. Physical training Is given free of charge to all students,
and is required of them for at least three hours a week in every year.
A physical examination is given at the beginning of the session, and
a record is kept of the condition of the individual. From this record
the student is advised as to the kind and amount of exercise best
suited to her needs.

THE GYMNASIUM. — The Gymnasium Building is complete in
every idetail. On the main floor are two gymnasium rooms — one
90x50 feet, for general activity; the other, 50x28 feet, equipped
for special exercise. On this floor also are the executive offices
and an examining room. A balcony surrounding the main gym-
nasium furnishes ample space for spectators. On the balcony floor
are recitation rooms, a dancing studio, and a trophy room. On
the lower floor are the lockers, dressing rooms, shower baths, and
hair dryers. On this floor also is a shampoo room, four bowling
alleys, and an instructor's office.

THE SWIMMING POOL. — The swimming pool is in a separate
building, adjoining the Gymnasium Building. It is 23x50 feet, and is
constructed of white tile. The water is constantly filtered and steri-
lized, and is kept at the temperature necessary for comfort. The
pool room is 66x28 feet, 39 feet in height, surrounded by a specta-
tors' balcony, and supplied with windows on both the pool and
balcony floors. A glass roof gives added light.

THE ATHLETIC FIELD. — The outdoor equipment consists of two
athletic fields (100x50 yards), three basketball courts, an archery
range, four tennis courts, and a riding ring. Adding to the com-
pleteness of this equipment is a cement court (179x40 feet), which
makes possible the playing of tennis and other games outdoors the
entire year.

THE STABLE. — Kentucky and Tennessee are world-famed as the
birthplace of the American saddle horse. It seems altogether fitting
that a school situated within a few miles of the famous Belle Meade
Stock Farm should offer every opportunity to its students to perfect
themselves in the one sport for which the South for generations has
been preeminent.

The Ward-Belmont stable is owned and maintained by the school.
It consists of gaited saddle horses carefully selected as types of dis-



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position entirely suitable for school work, and are as safe as is pos-
sible for horses to be. Careful instruction is given in the various
types of horsemanship, and a groom is in constant attendance, both
in the ring and on the road.

RIDING CERTIFICATE

The following course leading to a Riding Certificate is offered for
students eighteen years of age or older who wish to specialize in
riding:

Physical Education 19, 20

Physical Education 29, 30

Physical Education 15, 16

DANCING CERTIFICATE

The courses offered by the Dance Department have been given
due consideration from an artistic and physical standpoint. The first
grants an intelligent appreciation of Dancing as to beauty. Interpre-
tation, characterization, and musical improvisation. The second,
through the practise of rhythmic exercise to musical accompaniment,
enables the student to attain perfect posture, grace and poise, ac-
complishing as a result a coordination of mind, body and muscle.

The teaching method used is a modification of toe technic In
combination with counteracting exercises of "relaxation," thereby
developing freedom of movement and abolishing rigidity and ten-
sion. Whether the student is interested in Dancing as a profession,
as an accomplishment, or as merely an exercise, she will find here
the type of work to meet her need.

The following course leading to the Dancing Certificate is offered
for college students who wish to specialize In Dancing:

First Year

English I, 2

Music 15; 16

History of Art 1.2

Library Methods

Physical Education 15, 16

Physical Education II, 12

English 21, 22

Physical Education 23. 24

Physical Education 31, 32

Note — Academic subjects required for this certificate are not included in the extra
chargre for the work of this department.



Second Year



6


hours


6


hours


4


hours


1


hour


1


hour


4 hours


6


hours


6


hours


6


hours



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High school students who wish to perfect themselves in the art
of Dancing or who wish to work toward the Dancing Certificate, are
permitted to do the practical dancing work — six hours a week — and
will be awarded a Proficiency Certificate in Practise at the com-
pletion of two years of work.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIPLOMA

A two-year course is offered to those who wish to specialize in
Physical Education. It is open to students who have been admitted
to college standing, with the usual college-entrance requirements.

Applicants to the course must be without organic disease or any
serious functional disorder. The course each year amounts to
twenty-six semester hours of recitation or lecture, and a minimum
of six hours per week in practical work. For the latter, six semester
hours of credit are allowed. A minimum of sixty quality credits* on
the two-year course Is required.

First Year Second Year

Physical Education 15, 16 1 hour Physical Education 23. 24 6 hours

Physical Education 13, 14 2 hours Physical Education 25. 26 4 hours

Physical Education 17, 18 6 hours Physical Education 27, 28 6 hours

Biology II, 12 8 hours Physiology II, 12 6 hours

Chemistry II, 12 8 hours Psychology 2 1 ; 22 6 hours

English 1,2 6 hours Elective 4 hours

Library Methods i hour

NOTE — Academic subjects required for this diploma are not included in the extra
charge for the work of this department.

I, 2. Gymnastics and Sports. This course is required of all freshman college
students unless Physical Education II, 12 is elected. During the fall and spring
students elect outdoor sports. Elementary work in marching, calisthenics, folk
dancing and light gymnastic work is given during the winter. Swimming is re-
quired until the student is able to pass a proficiency test. Dancing or riding
may be electfed in place of sports.

Three hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, two semester hours.

3-A. Swimming. Instruction for beginners.
One hour a week.

3-B. Swimming. Elementary strokes and dives, for pupils who have learned to
swim and wish instruction in perfecting form.
One hour a week for eight weeks.

II, 12. Elementary Certificate Dancing. Instruction is given in the technic
of classic, character, folk, interpretive, toe, and tap dancing. The lecture work



"See note, page 25, for explanation of quality credits.



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covers an explanation of technical terms used in teaching dancing, and of
musical terms, note values and tempos with reference to dance composition.
During the second semester a survey is made of folk costume in relation to
authentic dances of foreign countries.

Dancing, six hours a week; lecture, one hour a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, four semester hours.

I l-A. Dancing. Instruction in elementary technic and classic, interpretive and
folk dances of medium difficulty.
One hour a week.

I l-B. Dancing. Instruction in elementary technic of toe dancing and in toe
dances of medium difficulty.
One hour a week.

Il-C. Dancing, instruction in elementary tap dancing.
One hour a week.

Il-D. Dancing. Instruction in ballroom dancing.
One hour a week.

Il-E. Dancing. Instruction In nature and interpretive dancing.
One hour a week.

I l-F. Dancing. Instruction in elementary character dancing.
One hour a week.

13, 14. Playground Supervision. This course embraces the history and scope of
the playground movement, playground organization, administration and conduct,
and the nature and function of play. The practical work includes normal in-
struction In folk dances and singing games, gymnastic and athletic games, ath-
letics, and craft work.

Open to any college student.

Two hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, two semester hours.

15, 16. Personal Hygiene. Lecture course on the parts of the body and their
care; the relationship of habits and environment to the health, efficiency, and
well-being of the individual; lectures, readings and papers. Required of all
second-year students and applicants for diplomas.

One hour a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, one semester hour.

17, 18. Sports and Gymnastics. During the fall and spring, outdoor sports —
field hockey, archery, tennis, basketball, baseball, and track — are practised
for the development of skill. During the winter, instruction is given In military
marching and elementary tactics, elementary free standing exercises and work
with hand apparatus, tumbling, fundamental work on gymnastic apparatus such



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as horse, parallel bars, boom, ropes, ladders, rings, etc. One hour a week is
required in dancing and in swimming.

Six to nine hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.

19, 20. Certificate Riding. Instruction is given covering all fundamental points
of mounting, dismounting, controlling the horse, riding and gaiting the walk, trot
and canter, and road riding. The anatomy and conformation of the horse, sad-
dling, bridling, and the care of the horse are studied in lecture periods.

Riding, six hours a week, fall and spring; lecture, four hours a week for one
semester. Credit, four semester hours.

19-A. Riding. For beginners. Instruction in mounting, dismounting, proper
methods of holding reins and guiding the horse, the seat and how to ride the
walk, trot, and canter.

Open to all students.

Fall and spring.

NOTE — The Riding Ticket listed (p. 85) includes Riding: for three hours a week
for eight weeks, during the fall or spring quarter, and one two-hour ride a week during
the winter.

2l, 22. Elective Sports. This course in connection with Physical Education 15, 16
is required of all second-year students. Outdoor sports are offered during the
autumn and spring; indoor sports and gymnastics during the winter. Courses
in dancing, riding or swimming may be elected to meet the requirements in
■full or in part.

Two hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, one semester hour.

23. Anatomy. A course in Gross Anatomy, concerning bones, ligaments, and
muscles.

Three hours a week.

First semester. Credit, three semester hours.

24. Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology. A study of the mechanical structure of
the body, of muscular control and action, and of the effects produced upon
the body by various forms of physical activity.

Three hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.

25. Methods of Teaching Gymnastics. A brief history of Physical Education,
with a study of gymnastic terminology and methods of teaching and organizing
progressive courses and lessons in gymnastics.

Two hours a week.

First semester. Credit, two semester hours.

26. Observation and Practise Teaching. The aim of this course is to give each
student practical experience in teaching and coaching under critical observation.

Two hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, two semester hours.



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27, 28. Advanced Work in Sports and Gymnastics. During the fall and spring,
outdoor sports will be practised for further development of skill and v/ill be
studied for knowledge of rules and coaching nnethods. During the winter, ad-
vance work in marching, gymnastics, calisthenics, apparatus work and tumbling
will be given. Dancing and swimming will be required one period a week each.

Six to nine hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.

29, 30. Advanced Certificate Riding. Instruction in signaling a five-gaited
saddle horse, in jumping and hurdling, and in games and stunt riding is given
to girls who have shown sufficient proficiency in riding. The lecture work of this
class covers the subjects of stable management, selection of horses, methods of
organizing and teaching riding classes and road groups. Work in observation and
practise teaching is required.

Riding, six hours a week, fall and spring; lecture, four hours a week for one
semester. Credit, four semester hours.

Fall and spring.

29-A. Riding. Three-gaited class. For pupils who have ridden, but wish les-
sons. Instruction in riding the walk, trot, canter, and in properly gaiting the
horse.

29-B. Riding. Five-gaited class. Open only to pupils who have perfected
themselves in the three-gaited class. The work of the class consists mainly in
learning to signal properly a five-gaited saddle horse.

29-C. Riding. Jumping and hurdling. Open only to pupils who have passed
the three-gaited work and are good horsev/omen. Instruction in the management
of the horse and the proper seat and hands on the jump.

29-D. Riding. Road riding. Open only to pupils who can satisfactorily pass
a road riding test.

29-E. Riding. Games and stunt riding. Open only to pupils who can pass
Physical Education 29-A.

31, 32. Advanced Certificate Dancing. Instruction is given in advanced technic
of classic, character, interpretive, toe, and tap dancing. During the first semester
the lectures include an outline of historical and period costumes in relation to
dances characteristic of various countries and times. In the second semester
original dance compositions for group and solo work and the process of recital
programs including make-up and stage lighting are studied. One hour a week
is devoted to individual composition and adaptation of dances and to methods
of instruction.

Dancing, six hours a week; lecture, two hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.

31. -A. Dancing. Instruction in intermediate technic and in national, character
and interpretive dances.
One hour a week.



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31-B. Dancing. Instruction in intermediate technic of toe dancing and in toe
dances of progressive difficulty.
One hour a week.

31-C. Dancing. Instruction in advanced technic and in national, character and
interpretive dances.
One hour a week.

31-D. Dancing. Instruction in advanced technic and toe dancing.
One hour a week.

31-E. Dancing. Instruction in advanced nature and interpretive dancing.
One hour a week.

31-F. Dancing. Instruction in advanced character dancing.
One hour a week.

31-G. Dancing. Instruction in routine of advanced tap dancing.
One hour a week.



PHYSIOLOGY

MISS GOODRICH

II, 12. General Physiology. This is a study of the human body, its structure,
functions, and the laws which govern it and of how to maintain the health of the
individual and community.

Prerequisite: working knowledge of Biology and Chemistry.

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.

22. Physiology for Home Economics Students. A study of human physiology. In-
cluding the principles of cell metabolism and the use of foods, the structure and
functions of the organs.

Prerequisite: Chemistry II, 12.

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.

Second semester. Credit, three semester hours.



PSYCHOLOGY

MISS NORRIS

12. Practical Psychology. An application of psychological principles to the social
and emotional aspects of campus life, with individual experiments on building
habits conducive to efficient social relations.

Two hours a week.

Second semester. Credit, two semester hours.



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21; 22. Psychology. An Introductory course in Psychology, giving a general sur-
vey of the fundamental facts and laws of mind, with applications and simple il-
lustrative experiments, followed by an introductory course in the study of child-
hood, with practical applications.

Three hours a week.

First semester, second semester. Credit, six semester hours.



RELIGION

MISS SANDERS MISS VAN HOOSER

II; 12. A Survey of Biblical Literature. The study in this course is based on the


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Online LibraryWard-Belmont School (1913-1951)Annual Catalog and Announcement. The Ward-Belmont School for Young Women, 1934-1935 (1933, December). (Volume 1933, December) → online text (page 4 of 8)