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Ward-Belmont School (1913-1951).

Catalogue and Announcement of the Ward-Belmont School for Young Women, 1915-1916. (Volume 1915-1916) online

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imagination; story-telling; literary interpretation; platform art; dra-
matic rehearsal (comedy); pantomime in problems and readings.

Open to students who have completed Expression I.

Expression III. — (a) Principles of Training: Voice training; reso-
nance; use of voice in conversation and narration; visible speed and
articulation; dramatic rehearsals (comedy); development of imagina-
tion; rise of the drama; epochs of literature.

(b) Creative Work: Impersonations in Browning's monologue and
original arrangements from modern literature or drama; vocal inter-



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pretation of the Bible; drill on methods; pantomimic problems and
rehearsals; modern drama; public presentations of original arrange-
ments.

Expression IV. — Interpretative Expression: Primary forms of litera-
ture, fables, folk stories, allegories, lyrics, old ballads, conversation,
and story-telling. One period a week.

Expression V. — Creative Expression: Interpretation of forms of
poetry or of modern drama. This course is similar in design to Ex-
pression IV, and is open to students of the same maturity. One period
a week.

Expression VI. — Creative Expression: A study of dramatic thinking;
the forms of the drama; dramatic rehearsals from the sixteenth,
eighteenth, nineteenth centuries, and modern plays; impersonations or
platform interpretation and a study of the monologue. Open to stu-
dents of mature mind who have completed Expression V. One period
a week.

Expression YII. — ^Voice Training: Harmonic gymnastics; practical
problems for voice, body, and imagination. This course is designed
for public school-teachers or for those purposing to become such, for
those actively engaged in club work, or in any position where public
speaking is a necessity. One period a week.

Expression Till. — Pageantry: Community festivals; correlation with
history; music, art, folk dancing, and domestic art; the development
of allegorical and historical pageantry. One period a week.

Expression IX. — Children's Course: The utilization of childish apti-
tude in imagination, song, fancy dancing, handcraft, and rhythmic
speech; oral interpretation of folk tales, lyric ballads, epic and dra-
matic poetry; the development of character through the dramatiza-
tion of familiar stories.

m. SCHOOL OF ART

The creative power, whicli, in a greater or less degree,
is the possession of every human soul, should be recog-
nized and cultivated, and that appreciation developed
which is the beginning of all growth of Art. The study
of Art involves the training of the eye, mind, and hand,
and that exercise of both skill and judgment which makes
for power in an individual and creates efficiency, no mat-
ter what the calling may be. Thus understood, the study
of Art should have a place in every liberal education.
The Ward-Belmont studios are in the new Administra-
tion and Academic Building, and embrace five large



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rooms with excellent light. Students of college advance-
ment, specializing in Art, are seriously advised to elect
History and Appreciation of Art as one of their literary
subjects. In every branch of the School of Art the ob-
ject is to make the pupil proficient and to give her a
foundation upon which she can build. The methods of
instruction are varied, and are such as have been found
to be the most efficient in developing the possibilities of
each student, and in giving her the means of artistic self-
expression.

STUDIO CLASSES

I. Elementary. — The first steps in the appreciation of form, pro-
portion, and values are taken in this course. The work is done in
charcoal from simple still-life studies, which enahles the beginner to
learn the principles of drawing, the foundation of all art expression.

II. Life Drawing. — The costumed model is used daily in the life
drawing class. After becoming familiar with their materials, students
are encouraged to begin work in this most interesting branch of
Representative Art. The models are posed to help the pupil in the
study of both composition and illustrations, and studies are produced
in all the different mediums — oil, water color, chalk, pastel, pen and
ink, charcoal, and clay. Quick sketching is practiced frequently, and
is most beneficial for all students; and for those making a specialty
of illustration, it is excellent training in character drawing.

III. Clay Modeling. — Clay modeling is taught by the use of casts
and living models. Casts are used as models for the beginner; and as
skill is gained, work from the life model is encouraged.

IV. China Decoration. — China painting may be undertaken by those
who are sufficiently advanced in drawing and design. Students capa-
ble of passing an examination in drawing v/ill be excused from fur-
ther work in this line. The study of design is required in all classes.

V. Pen Drawing. — Pen drawing is of special use to those desirous
of becoming illustrators. A good foundation in drawing and values is
necessary. Use is made in this class of casts, still life, flower studies,
and costumed models.

TI. Pottery. — A class in pottery offers opportunities to build, dec-
orate, and glaze the pupil's own conceptions. A study is made of the
compositions and uses of the different clays and glazes. A kiln is part
of the equipment of this department, and the firing of pottery and
china is taught.

711. Outdoor Sketching.— The campus offers ample opportunities for
outdoor sketching. Application is made of the principles of composi-
tion, values, perspective, and color.



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Till. Design. — One day in each week instruction is given in the
fundamental principles of design. The study tends to develop original
thought, stir up latent ideas, and induce activity of the imagination.
Various applications of these principles are made by the entire class
to borders, rugs, book covers, stenciling, wood-block printing, etc. The
most advanced students design practical and artistic furniture and
study methods of interior decoration. This class is required of all
Art students.

IX. Etching. — A room well equipped with a hand press and all
the conveniences for etching enables the advanced student in draw-
ing to apply this knowledge in a practical way and to enjoy this most
fascinating and attractive form of Art. The beauty of line and tone
is expressed in landscapes as well as in sketches from the life model,
the colored inks giving a charm and variety to the many prints made
from one plate.

IV. CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC

The Ward-Belmont School of Music possesses the com-
bined virtues of the Belmont School of Music and the
Ward Conservatory, both of which had long been the ob-
jectB of the high praise and the generous patronage of
educated musicians both in and out of Nashville. It is
more than a complete modern Conservatory of Music;
it offers to music students what all of them need — sup-
plementary work in English, French, German, and Lit-
erature. The "mere musician," the talented player or
singer who lacks general education, will be to-morrow
more than ever before at a disadvantage, and will be re-
garded as just so much less a musician. The best mu-
sical educators are agreed that general mental discipline
should not precede, but should continuously accompany,
musical studies; and schools of music are seeking what
we have already at hand — intimate affiliation with liter-
ary classroom work. Under our system, musical study
and practice are not allowed to suffer or be crowded out,
but the student is shown how she may become both a cul-
tured woman and a thorough musician. Our musical fac-
ulty is now probably the largest and most expensively
maintained one in any school for girls in America. No
teacher is chosen who has not had the best of advantages,
most of them in both this country and Europe, teachers



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who have supplemented graduation from the leading con-
servatories with years of special study under the recog-
nized masters of two continents. All of them are tested
teachers. No novices are employed. Pianoforte, Voice,
Violin and other stringed instruments, Pipe Organ, The-
ory, Harmony, Composition, the History and Literature
of Music, Interpretation, Ear Training, Sight Reading
and Chorus, Ensemble and Orchestral Work, Eepertoire
and Memorizing, and Faculty, Student, and Artist Reci-
tals — all, and more, take their appropriate places and
contribute to the creation of a wholesome and inspiring
musical atmosphere. Such an atmosphere is possible no-
where except in a large school where musical education
is seriously undertaken by a faculty composed of tested
professional musical educators. Frequent student reci-
tals are given, as are recitals and lectures by the faculty
and other eminent musicians. Pupils may attend the
best concerts in the city. Operas are frequently given by
excellent companies, and the world's greatest artists ap-
pear in Nashville from time to time. The immediate and
convenient value of these advantages at our own door
will be the more apparent when it is known that our stu-
dents may have throughout the season the great musical
entertainments, but a very few of which other Southern
schools can enjoy, and these only by means of travel and
additional expense from the smaller towns into the city.
Certificates and diplomas are conferred for finished work
in this school.

Boarding students specializing in Music, Art, Expression, or Home
Economics are required to take at least one literary course.

Theory is required of all music students in the hoarding depart-
ment who have not previously completed the equivalent of Theory
I. Credit for Theory I, if taken elsewhere, will be granted only on
the basis of an examination. Those who have such credit must select
one of the following: Theory, Harmony, Counterpoint, History and Ap-
preciation of Music, Ear Training, Pedagogy.

Our special Music Catalogue gives full information.



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CURRICULUM OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Requirements fok Teachers' Certificate in Piano
Technic. — 1. Major Scales (minimum speed, four notes to M.M. 120),
played with both hands in parallel motion through four octaves;
Thirds; Sixths; Tenths. Contrary motion.

2. Minor Scales: Harmonic and Melodic, played with both hands
in parallel and contrary motion; Thirds; Sixths; Tenths.

3. Diatonic and Chromatic Scales in velocity, in varied rhythms,
and illustrative of the legato, staccato, and portamento touch; Arpeg-
gios in combined rhythms; illustrations of musical embellishments.

4. Chords: Major, Minor, and Diminished Triads, Dominant and
Diminished Sevenths, all with added octaves. Patterns of harmonic
successions modulating through all keys.

5. Arpeggios in various forms and harmonic successions.

6. Double Thirds: Major and Minor Scales (each hand alone).

7. Octaves: Scales and Arpeggios in various touches and rhythms.

History. — The candidate must have had two years in Music His-
tory, must have acquired a musical vocabulary embracing the musical
terms in common use and their abbreviations, and must be able to
outline satisfactorily the evolution of the piano, piano literature, and
piano technic.

Harmony. — The candidate must be able to harmonize any figured
bass or any melody; to extract the figured bass from two classical
compositions — one to be a slow, the other a fast, movement from a
Mozart or Beethoven Sonata; to modulate between any two keys by
various means; and to transpose any hymn or any ordinary compo-
sition.

Repertoire (not necessarily memorized). — Two complete Sonatas of
Beethoven, one of which the candidate must have prepared independ-
ently; eight other movements selected from the more difficult Sona-
tas of Mozart and Haydn; one slow and one fast Concerto movement;
more than half of Bach's Two-Part Inventions and four of his Three-
Part Inventions; also most of Haberbier, Op. 53; selections from
Mendelssohn and Schumann; also from Chopin's Preludes, Mazurkas,
Nocturnes, and Valses; Cramer Studies, and Czerny, Op. 740; and six
recital pieces of about the fourth grade. May be presented in four
divisions and during two successive years.

Sight Reading. — The candidate must be able to play at sight the
easier selections from Mozart's and Haydn's Sonatas and Mendelssohn's
Songs Without Words; accompaniments for advanced violin and vocal
music; any part of moderately difficult works arranged for piano en-
semble.

Pedagogy. — The candidate for Teachers' Certificate in Piano must
have had two years in Pedagogy, and must be prepared to demonstrate
lessons in rhythm, touch, technic, memory training, theory, and funda-



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mental harmony; also to assign studies and pieces to students of
various grades. The candidate must be able to discover in the playing
of pieces incorrect notes, rhythm, fingering, phrasing, and pedaling.

Candidates for the Teachers' Certificate in Piano must announce
themselves to the Director of Music at the opening of the year, and, in
addition to regular work under their respective teachers, are required
to take with him a year's course of at least one lesson a week in
Interpretation and Technic.

Requisements for Ceetq^icate in Piano
Technic. — 1. Major Scales (minimum speed, four notes to M.M.
120), played with both hands in parallel motion through four octaves;
Thirds; Sixths; Tenths. Contrary motion (speed, four notes to M.M.
104).

2. Minor Scales: Harmonic and Melodic, played with both hands
in parallel motion (speed, four notes to M.M. 104).

3. Diatonic and Chromatic Scales, in varied rythm; also scales il-
lustrative of the legato, staccato, and portamento touch.

4. Chords: Major, Minor, and Diminished Triads, Dominant and
Diminished Sevenths, all with added octaves.

5. Arpeggios in various forms on Major and Minor Triads; Domi-
nant and Diminished Seventh Chords.

6. Double Thirds: Major Scales (each hand alone).

7. Octaves: Diatonic and Chromatic Scales; all Tonic Triads.

Harmony. — A candidate for the certificate must be thoroughly famil-
iar with the Major and Minor Modes (harmonic and melodic) ; In-
tervals; the construction of Triads and Seventh Chords, their inver-
sions and thorough bass figures. The candidate must be able to recog-
nize, by sound, fundamental position of Triads and Dominant Sevenths,
and to transpose any succession of Triads (not containing a modu-
lation).

History of Music. — The candidate for the certificate must have had
one year of History of Music, and must have acquired a musical
vocabulary embracing the musical terms in common use and their
abbreviations.

Sight Reading. — ^The candidate for the certificate must be able to
play at sight: Hymns; either part of a moderately difficult duet
(Kuhlau or Diabelli Sonatas, for instance) ; accompaniments for mod-
erately difficult songs or violin solos.

Repertoire {not necessarily memorized). — One complete Sonata con-
sisting of three or four movements; four other standard classical
pieces or movements from Sonatas, one of which the candidate must
have prepared without assistance or instruction from any source; six
polyphonic pieces, two of which to be Three-Part Inventions; selections
from Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words, Chopin Preludes and Ma-
zurkas, Haberbier and Cramer Studies. All to have been studied with-




U CQ



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in two successive years, and may be presented in four divisions dur-
ing that time.

Memorized Repertoire. — The candidate for the certificate must have
at least six solos, one of which shall be strictly classical, one poly-
phonic, and four either semiclassical or modern, all to have been ac-
quired within twelve months preceding examination.

Sight Singing. — The candidate for certificate must have had one
year in Ear Training and Chorus work.

Pedagogy. — The candidate must have had one year in Pedagogy.

Reqtjibements foe Certificate in Violin
Technic.—l. Major Scales, two and three, and Minor Scales, two
octaves (minimum speed, four notes to M.M. 100).

2. Scales illustrative of legato, spiccato, martele, staccato, and long-
held tones, crescendo and decrescendo.

3. Arpeggios: Grand, two and three octaves; various rhythms and
bowings.

4. Arpeggios on Dominant Seventh Chords, two octaves.

Sight Reading. — The candidate must be able to play at sight Duets
by Pleyel, Mazas, or Sonatas of the same grade of difficulty.

Memorized Repertoire. — ^The candidate must have at least six solos,
representative of Grades IV and V, one of which must be a princi-
pal movement (first or last) of a Concerto by Rode, Kreutzer, Viotti,
de Beriot, or another of equal standard; but all to have been acquired
within twelve months preceding examination.

Repertoire {not necessarily memorized). — One complete Sonata by
Nardini, Tartini, or other classic composer; four other standard clas-
sical pieces or movements from Sonatas or Concertos, one of which
must have been prepared by the candidate without assistance from
any source; ten smaller concert pieces; and selections from Studies
by Mazas, Dont, and Kreutzer. All to have been studied within two
successive years, and may be presented in four divisions during that
time.

The candidate must have studied Mazas, Op. 36, Vols. I and II, Dont
(preparatory to Kreutzer), and Kreutzer Studies.

The requirements in Harmony, History of Music, and Pedagogy are
the same as in Piano.

The candidate must have attended orchestra or ensemble practices
for at least one session, must be able to play on the piano accompani-
ments to solos of moderate difficulty, and must have finished the sec-
ond grade in Piano.

Requibements foe Certificate in Voice
The candidate must present a clear voice, perfectly even in its
scale, free from tremolo or other serious imperfections, and the in-
tonation must be pure and accurate.
4



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The candidate for the Certificate in Voice must be able to sing:
The Major Scale and the Melodic Minor Scale upward or downward
from a given tone; exercises for the flexibility of the voice (diatonic
progressions on Major Scales), four notes to M.M. 92; Arpeggios on
Major and Minor Triads within the compass of a Tenth; any Major,
Minor, or Perfect Interval above or below a given tone.

The candidate must give illustrations of (a) Legato and Staccato
on Major Scales; (b) Crescendo and Diminuendo on single tones;
(c) Fundamental Phonetics; (d) the art of singing Recitative.

The Memorized Repertoire must contain at least six solos, one of
which must be from Opera and one from Oratorio, and the others to
be of like standard, all to have been acquired within the twelve months
preceding examination. The candidate must be acquainted with two
standard Oratorios and one Opera, and must be able to sing, not
necessarily from memory, any of the solos suited to her voice. The
requirements in Harmony, History of Music, Sight Singing, and Musi-
cal Vocabulary are the same as in Piano. The candidate must be
able to sing at sight any part of a given hymn, any song not con-
taining distant modulations; must be able to play hymns and ac-
companiments to moderately diflBcult songs on the piano; and must
have finished the second grade in Piano. The candidate must have
had one year in Pedagogy.

Reqtjibements fob Ceetificate in Organ
Technic. — ^The requirements in manual technic are the same as
in Piano, excepting that the range of Scales and Arpeggios is adapted
to the organ and that the minimum speed for pedal technic is con-
siderably lowered.

Harmony. — A candidate for the certificate must be thoroughly fa-
miliar with the Major and Minor Modes (harmonic and melodic) ;
Intervals; the construction of Triads and Seventh Chords and their
inversions; and must be able to harmonize figured basses or given
melodies, both in writing and at the keyboard; to modulate between
related keys; to recognize, by sound, fundamental positions of Triads
and Dominant Sevenths, and to transpose any succession of Triads
and Dominant Sevenths (not containing distant modulation).

Sight Reading. — The candidate for the certificate must be able to
play at sight: Hymns, and arrange and register them suitably for
congregational singing; moderately diflBcult accompaniments for an-
thems and solos; short trios for two manuals and pedals; to transpose
a hymn or chant one tone above or below the original key; to play
at sight a quartet in vocal score, four staves in G and F clefs.

Repertoire {not necessarily memorized). — Easier Preludes and
Fugues of Bach ; one Prelude and Fugue and one Sonata of Mendelssohn;
one complete Sonata of either Guilmant, Merkel, or Rheinberger, and
to have been prepared independently ; selections from " Church and
Concert Organist," by Eddy, and from the " Chorals," by Rinck and
Bach; ten standard compositions, five of which must be by American



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composers. All to have been studied within two successive years, and
may be presented for examination in four divisions during that time.
The requirements in History of Music and Sight Singing are the
same as in Piano.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Requibements foe Graduation in Piano
Technic. — 1. Major and Minor Scales, with both hands in parallel
motion through four octaves (speed, four notes to M.M. 144) ; Thirds;
Sixths; Tenths. Contrary motion (speed, four notes to M.M, 112).

2. Diatonic and Chromatic Scales in velocity and varied rhythm;
also scales illustrative of the legato, staccato, and portamento touch.

3. Chords: Major, Minor, and Diminished Triads; Dominant, Minor,
and Diminished Seventh Chords; all with added octaves.

4. Arpeggios on Major, Minor, and Diminished Triads; Dominant,
Minor, and Diminished Seventh Chords; in all positions.

5. Double Thirds and Sixths: Major and Minor Scales (each hand
alone) ; Chromatic Minor Thirds.

6. Octaves: Diatonic and Chromatic Scales; Arpeggios of Major
and Minor Triads and Chords of the Seventh.

Harmony. — The candidate for graduation must be able to recognize
at sight and to name all kinds of Triads, all kinds of Chords of
Sevenths, Chords of Ninths, and augmented Chords in compositions;
to recognize by sound all kinds of Triads and their inversions, the
Dominant Seventh and its inversions; to harmonize any melody not
containing distant modulations by means of Triads and Dominant
Sevenths; to transpose any hymn or any ordinary composition not con-
taining distant modulations.

History of Music. — The candidate for graduation must have had
two years of History of Music, and must have acquired a musical
vocabulary embracing the musical terms in common use and their
abbreviations.

Sight Reading. — The candidate for graduation must be able to play
at sight most of Mozart's Sonatas and the easier ones of Haydn.

Repertoire {not necessarily memorized). — One movement from a
standard Concerto; two complete Beethoven Sonatas, one of which the
candidate must have prepared without assistance or instruction from
any source; one Prelude and Fugue from Well-Tempered Clavichord;
standard selections from Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, and modern com-
posers. All to have been studied within two successive years, and
may be presented in four divisions during that time.

Memorized Repertoire. — The candidate for graduation must have
at least ten solos, one of which shall be a movement from a Concerto
or a standard Sonata; two shall be polyphonic pieces; and of the re-
mainder, some shall be semiclassical and some romantic; all to have
been acquired within the twelve months preceding examination.



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Sight Singing. — The candidate for graduation must have had two
years in Ear Training and Chorus work.

Pedagogy. — The candidate must have had two years in Pedagogy,
and must be prepared to demonstrate lessons in rythm, touch, technic,
memory training, theory, and fundamental harmony, and assign studies
and pieces for students of various grades.

Candidates for graduation in Piano must announce themselves to
the Director at the beginning of the year, and, in addition to regular
work under their respective teachers, are required to take with him a
year's course of one lesson a week in Interpretation and advanced
Technic.

Requieements foe Geaduation in Voice

The candidate must present a clear voice, perfectly even in its
scale, free from tremolo or other serious imperfections, and the in-
tonation must be pure and accurate.

The candidate for graduation in Voice must be able to sing: Major


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Online LibraryWard-Belmont School (1913-1951)Catalogue and Announcement of the Ward-Belmont School for Young Women, 1915-1916. (Volume 1915-1916) → online text (page 4 of 7)