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Ward-Belmont School (1913-1951).

Town Topics (Princeton), Nov. 29-Dec. 5, 1953 (Volume v.8, no.38) online

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George Dinsmore Stoddard, former President of the
University of Illinois, and one of this country's best
known educators, wlio has established his home here
and has now enlisted in the ever-growing ranks of
commuting Princetonians. This past week, for the first
time since July when he capped a headline-making
controversy by resigning from the presidency of
Illinois, he gave his first public address, participating
in the special service of installation for the first min-
ister ( Straughan Lowe Gettier I of the community's
newly formed Unitarian Church.

.In his Sunday sermon, entitled "The Way of the
Liberal," Stoddard strongly defended liberalism, made
no references whatsoever to last summer's running
rhubarb and emphasized: "We must step up immensely
our efforts to secure for every child and adult an edu-
cation in the art of straight thinking and we must
encourage them to practice the art in humane fashion."
This philosophy of education has been a driving force
in a career that now finds Stoddard serving as a con-
■ sultant to the Encyclopedia Britannica's motion picture
division and preparing to inaugurate, under a Carnegie
Foundation grant, an exhaustive appraisal of New York
University's past, present and future.

Before taking over the president's ppst at Illinois in
1946, Stoddard, an alumnus of Penn State, had first
made his name as a tester and child psychologist at the
University of Iowa, directing its Graduate College as
well as the Child Welfare Research Station, and had



WE NOMINATE

then held forth for four years as New York State's
Commissioner of Education. Chairman of the American
Council on Education in 1946-47 and a leader in the
formation of the United Nations Educational. Scientific
and Cultural Organization. Stoddard in 1946 also headed
the group of American educators who studied and com-
pletely overhauled the .Japanese school system.

Things hummed during Stoddard's years in the city
of Champaign-Urbana. Illinois' enrollment jumped
from 12.000 to some 23,000, its annual budget ballooned
to §40.000,000 and its full-time faculty reached the
3,100-mark. As satisfied as Illinois apparently was with
such innovations as a department of preventive medi-
cine and public health, Stoddard was first criticized for
his interest in UNESCO, was reminded that his presi-
dency Svas a "full-time job." The relationships between
the outspoken Stoddard and the Trustees, involving
everything from budgetary battles to the place of the
cancer drug Kreblozen in the research program, steadi-
ly deterioriated until the Trustees, reportedly acting
on a motion made by Harold E. ( Red ) Grange, express-
ed lack of confidence in his administration. He promptly
resigned and days later announced his move here.

For his distinguished service to the cause of Ameri-
can education; for his faith in this Nation's capacity for
worthy and responsible leadership in a world in which
many are confused and fearful of the future; for hom-
ing solidly to the principles he believes in so deeply;
he is Town Topics' nominee for



PRINCETON'S MAN OF THE WEEK



Give a
FRIGIDAIRE APPLIANCE

For Christmas

PERESETT APPLIANCE

246 Nassau St. Tel. 0762

We Sell the Best
and Senuce the Rest








TEL. 2*00



NOVEMBER ■29tDECEMBER 5,
.1



19S3



Businessmen's Secretarial

Service

Mail nnd Telephone

Bur-Wick's
Secretarial Services

134 Nassau SL — 17G0



27 Knitting Days
Until CliTistmas

THE KNiniNG SHOP

6 Tulane St. Tel. 0308



MIRRORS

We are now offering

COSMOPOLITAN

Copper-Coated Mirrors

NELSON'S
GLASS SHOP

(Behind Tydol Station)
248 Nassau St. — Tel. 2880



Unusual Buys

Black & White

fifth 6.09 •

Dewar's White Label

fifth 6.13
WINE & GAME SHOP

6 Nassau St. — Tel. 2468 or 3748
FREE DELIVERY



Christmas Gift
Suggestions

Sweaters $5 to ?15
Pajamas $3.95 to $S
Knox Hats $8.50 to $10
Neckwear $1.50 to $3.50
Gloves $2 up

Tattersall Vests

$13.50 and $18.50
.Alligator Rainwear

Harry Ballot

20 Nassau SL



Qlomn Capita

PutiliBhed Every Thursday Tbroushout
the Year



Donald C. Stuart Jr.

Dan D. Coyuc

Editors and PubUshert

Katharine H. Brktnaix
Thomas S. Godolphin
Contributing Editors

Mailed without charge every week to
every home and place o( business tn
Princeton Borough and Township and to
part ur all ol Wost Windsor. Lawienve.
Hopewell. Muntgumery and Franklin
Townships and Grlggstown.

SubKription price (for area outstde that

served by the Princeton Post Office)

$1.50 per year

AdvertisthK Rates on ApDllcalton

4 Mercer Street Telephone 2201

Princeton. N. J.

Vol VIII. No. 38 Nov 29-Dec 5. 1953



MAYFLOWER




AND STORE, TOO!

We Hove This Area's
Finest Warehouse

MANNING'S

NATIONWIDE MAYFLOWER

SERVICE

Safe Storage, Too

CALL 1848



Topics of the Town



Credit System Established Here.
The Boyd System of charge ac-
counts, originated by Joseph M.
Boyd of 152 Alexander Street, and
now operating in nearly a dozen
New Jersey and Pennsylvania com-
munities, will soon be available to
residents of Princeton. The service
is one of community charge ac-
counts, in which "pass books" en-
able residents to receive a single
statement each month for pur-
chases made at a group of stores.

Eleven Princeton retail stores
have become associated with the
Boyd System, with the books now
being mailed to residents of the
Princeton area. The stores which
will honor them include Bailey's.
Bert-Ann. The Clothes Lines.
Frank's Sport Shop, Hulit's, The
Joan Shop. Morris Men's Shop, The
Music Shop. Nassau Interiors. The
Nassau Music Center and Urken's.

A single statement showing all
purchases charged by the customer
at these stores is mailed to him on
a monthly basis. Only cash prices
are charged, and no service fee is
added to accounts which are paid
in full by a definite date each
month. *

For those who prefer to budget
their payments over periods ex-
tending up to five months, a service
fee of 50 cents a month is added
(beginning with the second month).
The fee remains the same, regard-
less of the amount of the custom-
er's balance. Accounts are payable
in person or by mail to one of the
Princeton banks.

It was in 1948 that the Boyd Sys-
tem was first introduced in Bristol,
Pa. It now serves five other Penn-
sylvania communities in nearby
Bucks County, as well as Trenton,
Bordentown and Burlington. All
Boyd "pass books" are honored at
all stores associated with the sys-
tem, regardless of their location.

Christmas Decorating Planned.
The Princeton Business association
will gi\e an award of $100 for the
most attractively decorated store
window during the Christmas sea-
son and a second award of $25 for
the most attractively decorated
business building. '

Loar Quickie, manager of the F.
W. Woolworth Store here and
chairman of the association's de-
corating committee, has announced
that the windows of all merchants
will be eligible for the awards,
whether they are members of the
association or not. ■ He also pointed
out that in the case of service com-
panies and oHices. merchandise is
not a necessary factor in the de-
corations.

The winning display windows will
be selected on the basis of artistic
a;t|ieal. sales effectiveness and im-
pact, while buildings will be judged
on originality, community appro-
priateness and advertising effec-
tiveness. The displays will be view-
ed by December 19 and the awards
will be made in the first part of
Christmas week.

Robin Hood Foiled. A Princeton
undergraduate who put money in-
to a parking meter parted with
$4.05 in all. Since the car parked
was not tiis own. he parted with the
nickel that went into the meter,
and since it was about to be tag-
ged for overtime by Lieutenant
—Continued on Page 2.



On This Thanksgiving Day


May We All, Thankful For


What We Have, Look Forward


WUh Hope


, To The Future


OF praiNCEXON


Princeton, N.J.


Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


and Federal Reserve System



~^c{^i^7SkcU



Give Dad his own s^r master barber





A man's whiskers grrow more
antj more 8tubl»orn with the
passing years, so shaving
becomes a tougher and tougher problem.
But every problem disappears when he
uses a modern Remington Electric
Shaver, particularly this amazing new
60 DeLuxe. It performs more than 24
million cutting operations each minute
— as gently as a Master Barber! It's



ID 7 Trade-in Allowance

FOR TOUR 010 ELECTRIC SHUVER!
IT n\% TO SWITCH TO THE NEW GS!



economical, too — no soap, blades or
brushes to buy And it will give D«d
effortless shaves anywhere, any time,
just as close as he likes. If Dad has
everything, excciit a smile n-lien he
s/iot'cj- here's one gift he'll appreciate
and use every day. You can buy a
Remington with confidence - it's fully
guaranteed, and you know Dad will be
happy with his own Master Barber.

Remington 60, De luxe less )00
trade-in allowance LL

UfllHOUTTRHDEIH...-. ..j^'IlSO



EDWARD A. THORNE-The Druggist



168 NASSAU STREET



TELEPHONE 0077



^Totvn Topics, November 29 - December J, 1953 ,



Claridge Wine & Liquor Co.

nne> Imported Wine*

Rpasonubly Priced

CALL 0657

40 Leigh Avenue





No Par


krng Problemi






JOHN >V. WHARF






<'UH


om Tail^




Carter


Road


Tel.


4230^




<iifts


— NovpltlM




Se


vmo Pr


■ncelon Since 1931 1



Kcmeinber
With Flowers

The Flower Basket

rSG NavHau St. Tel. 2G20



COMPLETE

WATCH REPAIR

$6.50

One-Yfiir Cuiirantee

pakman's

1> WilliiTspooii St. Tel. 1-S69e



AUTOMATIC
WASHER





Blackstone



It's the world's finest auto-
matic w«sher . . . "Tops" 'in
all comparative 'tcsrs. Don't
fall to see a demoristration of
this all-new Blackstone.
lan.l. PRICE

$329.95

7VLS0 USED WASHERS

Rlackslone. (new guar.l . . $150

1951 Hotpoint $98

Beiidix, working perfect . . . $35
Cendix. 6 mo. guarantee . . . $85
Bendix. Economat 1951 ... $65
Late Model Wringers .... $40

Kitchen Aid Dishwashers



Princeton Metal Works

H. B. wn.F

Washor Spppialist for over 20 Year.s
Sei-\'icing all Makes

MX. XUCAS ROAD

Tcleplionf 1-OlOX



rones OF the town

—Continued fiom Page 1
John H. S.iiilh. h*- uifv. a sunimtins
lo court. The fine was worth $4
in ihe opinion of Magistrate Paul
R. Chesebro.

David Wood, 7 Quarry Street, paid
a total of $50 for careless driving
anU driving-without a license. James
ihoiiison. BrunswicK Hike, owner
rf the rai was Hned ^55 for allow-
ing an unlicensed driver to operate
It. Others fined and the charges
against them:

John K^y. Wlnant Road, speed-
ing $15; Vicino Santo. Jr., Wood-
land Drive, passing a red tratlic
light, $5; Mr.s. Alice B. Norman.
Rocky Hill, failing to give the right
of- wav Ht an intersection. $10; and
Mrs. Mary J. HOffman, 119 Cedar
Lane, backing out of Moore Street
inlo the line of traffic on Nassau
Street.

The slate Department of Motor
Vehicles has announced that the
lirense of Robert Motley. 14 Shirley
Court, has been revoked for six
months. Three speeding convic-
tions and one for careless driving
apjwar on his record.

-Wrong Slot. Princeton's Volun-
teer Fire Dci>artment answered a
Inise alarm last Thursday— no new
expE'rience. The reason for the
alarm was new, however: a woman
who undcistood English with dif-
ficulty asked directions on how to
mail "a letter from a gardener who
si»oke English with difficulty.

The result, which occurred at the
corner of Library and Hodge, was
that she picked the red box Instead
of one of the two green ones. He
waited around to see what ^ap-
pened. she didn't.

In Honor of Mrs. Link. Mrs.
Charles W. Link will be honored at
ri YWCA mcmbei ship tea and open
tjouse Monday nii^hl at the YWs
Nassau Street center. In observa-
tion of her service to the associa-
tion, a portrait of her painted by
Peter Cook. Princeton artist, will
bf hung in YWCA headquarters.

Mrs. Link served for 13 years as
the asso'-iation's ex."'cutivo dirfctoi.
and has also served on the Play-
ground Con\mittee and in many
chuvch affairs. In announcing plans
to honor her. the YWCA comment -
rd: ''It is this unrelenting helping
hand, which she has conlinuL-d to
extend to one and all. that inspired
hpr friends to have '% poftrait paint-
e<I of one of Trinceton's most be-
loved citizens."

Mrs. nn/abeth Chauncey is chair-
man of the portrait committee. As-
sisting her are Mrs. Kenneth M.
Ritchie. Mr.;. Edwin Hell. Mrs. Wil-
liam Cha.Ttbierlln. 'Mrs. Walter Von
■B. Roberta, Miss Alice Cashill and
Mrs. Howard B. Waxwood, Jr.

Mtts. George Geary, chairman of
the menibership committee, and
Mrs. 'Frederick Stephan. chairmnn
of the 'liouse committee, are in
(^harJe of arran^i-ments for tlie
reception, All members of the YW
and friends of Mrs. Link, are in\tt-
ed In alt<?nd.

T a^s t.y -Sabples. International
coOkin^ — with samples of the
vnrious rii?hes a^'aik^b^e — will be
one of the courses offered by the
Princeton Adult School when it
opens in January.. The annuel ten-
wfcVi term will start the 14th of
that mottth in Princeton High
School.

Mrs. Gardener Patterson of 84
College 'Road will provide the in-
slniuetion in the stfhool's home
economics rooai. Members of the
cte£:s niay sample the food cooked
duHng ea(^h ctess period and re-
quest ipecial recipes they wish in-
cluded as part of the coui'se.

Mrs. Patterson is the author of
a rook book. "Meals for 'Guests,"
(o beipublish«i nexl^sprin^. Many
of the i^ciiws she collectett while
hPr'huftbarwi, now a member Of the
Det>arlment rtf -Economics at
P*'inr?ton'University, w-as stationed
in -Athens, Greece. TXirlng that
time, Mrs. Patterson travelled
lhrou;;h 'Europe and the "Near East,
[jursuing her hobby of collecting
• ntfrrsting recipes from many
lands. Two years ago. McCall's
Magazine featured her In its ''Best
Cook in Our Town" section,

Jaycees Celebrate. A Charter
Night Dinner and dance has been
arranged by the Junipj- Chamber
of Commerce Friday in the Nassau
•faxern. The occasion *ill mark
entrance of the Princeton chapter
— Continued on Page 4



SECRETARIAL SERMCES

KAY OWLES

164 Nassau Street Telephone 1-3504



The Little Hosiery Shop

200 NASSAU STREET -TELEPHONE 4366

Open Daily 9 to 6 — Friday nights until 9



If It s Copper This Christmas



Wc invite your inspection of tlie
e^zar Francais famous "666" ware.
Copper is a lifetime investmertt so
■1 Is important to buy the best. This
is the best. We are proud to carry it
and will be pleased to show it to
you.



Open Frid'iys to 9 p.m.



180 NASSAU ST.



Teleohone 4427



Princeton's Weekend Weather:

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY




SHOWERS & FAIR

CLEARING



PARTLY PARTLY

CLOUDY CLOUDY



TEMPERATURE: Three to Five degrees above normal of 44.
Wa^rmer by Sunday.

A Weekly Service Provided by

NASSAU OIL COMPANY

YOUR CULLIGAN SOFT WATER DEALER
Somerville Road Telephone 3530



Food Mart of Princeton

20 WiTHERSPOON STREET

HOT SHOT SPECIAL OF THE WEEK
ARMOUR'S STAR HAMS ... lb 59c



(WHOLE OR SHANK HALFl



Mixed

GROUND MEAT

For Meat Loaf



52



lb.



Sweet Florida

ORANGES
Doz



29c



Morton's

BEEF POT PIE

33c



Shoulder

VEAL CHOPS



39



lb.



Fancy Idaho

POTATOES

10*49t

Hunt's

Fruits for Salad

23c



Legs of Lancaster

LAMB



'Fatioy

IBOSCTEARS

6 '- 23c



'Campbell's

Chicken

Noodle Soup

Can 15c



I



BE SMART, SHOP FOOD MART



.Toivn Topics, November 29 - December 5, 1953 .



VETERAN TAXI SERVICE

Call 3070

An Improved S>"stem

for Prompt Service



OLO FAVORITES — UKE NEW

SHOE CLEANING

SHOE DYEINO

NASSAU SHOE REPAIR

'Behind Vanltv Fair Beautv Salon)
17& Nassau St. Rear



CMENS & McVAUGH

Plumbing and Heating

Coatractors

Princeton 8fi82-R-ll or SS87-J-U

Jaraesburg 1-0314-M




S^ff^S^




. . . but . . . Rosedale came to
his rescue. It's fun to trust
this dependable estabhsh-
ment . . . That trust is never
misplaced.

The Rosedale Family

I FROZEN LOCKER

Country Smoked
Bacon

II FEED MILL

Present this ad this
week and save $1.20
on a case (48 cans) of
dog beef or horse
meat.

III FENCING

Make the yard safe
for children by using
Walpole Fence.

IV GARDEN MARKET

Special on Flower-
ing Shrubs.



262 Alexander Street

Princeton, N. J.
PLENTY OF PARKING



It's New to Us



Fact or Fancy? When we shop-
ped for toys last year we wert-
push?d on every side by Space Men
and all their gadgetry. This year
the Space equipment is off in a
corner, gathering interstellar dust.
You'll find an occasional space gun
ifs true, but most of the toys have
come down to earth, and for every
rocket you'll find five Hoormops.

It's (furious — this shift in loy
fashion, It makes us ask the ques-
tion, "What's a toy for, anyhow?"
Is it supposed to bring color and
gaiety to a child's life, stimulate
liis imagination and entertain
him? Or should it tffing the adult
world down to his own small size
and give him miniature plumbing
tools to play with?

European toys, for the most part,
fulfill the first obligation, Ameri-
can toys the second, and we sug-
gest that probably your child would
like some of both.

RUb-A-Dub-Dub. For little girls,
especially, it's going to be a year
of household tasks. Shrewd moth-
ers who plan it right can have full-
time domestic help, junior size, just
l>y buying the right toys.

Begin with a Doll-E-Housekeep-
er. a three-foot cupboard that con-
tains a carpet sweeper, dustpan,
pail, broom, mop and dustbrush.
plus sponge and brillo. For $450.
It even has a Congoleum rug to
wash. These are at Urken's, 27
Witherspoon, and Pastimes at
Washington's Crossing.

At Tiger Auto. 26 Witherspoon,
we found .':tove, refrigerator, wash-
lub with washboard < relic of a
bygone day with which to amuse
the young) and drying arms. In the
same store, there's a Dutch cup-
board with cannisters and tea set
in deep coral-colored plastic. And a
■'Kiddie Kitchen'-' that folds in on
itself like a Pullman kitchen. Fufcly
equipped.

Tiger also has a wringer wash-
ing machine about eight inches
high, ironing board and electric
iron and all sorts of little carpet
sweepers. Brooms, mops and sweep-
ers also at Allen's, 134 Nassau.

Tea and baking sets Sourish
everywhere, of course. A Corona-
tion tea set at Tiger auto has a
crest on each piece. Tableware at
this store is made of "Metaltone"
— looks like gold and is clearly in-
t ended for formal use only. The
set holds salt-shaker, butter knife,
cake server and all the parapher-
nalia of a doll tea party. There's a
three-piece "silver" tea service at
Tiger, too. Heirloom stuff.

At Urken's there are baking sets,
as simple or elaborate as you
choose, and snack sets with pitcher
and small metal tumblers. Here's a
good find — aluminum cooking dish-
es in "open stock"— small teaket-
tles, pans, and the like for 39c and
49e.

You'll find doll tea sets, too, at
The Book Mart, 11 Palmer Square
West, and next to the dishes a cake
mix set with baking dishes and
Pillsbury mix. A soda fountaui
from Tiger Auto might be a good
companion gift.

Besides all these realistic play
devices, there are in every toy
store the standard pieces of doU
furniture: at Urken's, a bathinet
($11.95). a stroller, metal bunk bed
($12.95) with two mattresses, single
bed and crib. Here's a dressing
table, too. with mirror, brush and
comb. High chair, rockers, doll
trunks and doll carriages in vary-
ing sizes, with a doll-size serving
cart to add a new not^.

At Allen's, a low wooden cradle
in dark maple would hold a doll
about 16 inches long and rock her
to sleep almost as soon as her mis-
tress, ciribs in this store are wooden
one^ big enough for the oldest
member of the doU family. Some
rockers are maple, one is black
—Continued on Page 10



H. G. Houghton & Sons

Custom Built Homes
Developers

Established 1919
PRINCETON. N. J.



AFTER FIVE DRESSES

Cocktails to Da»n

at

"THE OLD STONE HOUSE"

Mary Gill, Inc.



230 Nassau St.



Parking in Rear



ENJOY COMPLIMENTARY

Hors D'Oeuvres

Cocktail Hour— 4:30 to 6:30 - Mondays through Fridays
COLONIAL LOUNGE

Nassau Tavern Hotel

PALMER SQUARE



ALEXANDER'S FAMED
WALKIE DOLLS

ALSO, NANCY ANN STORY BOOK DOLL
SERIES AT



L>iLlJci/n fjet/c



'NC.



and



^k^ SuL-%eJ)^ SltOfL



20 NASSAU ST.
Tel. 3221



6 CHAMBERS ST.
Tel. 3222



Phone Orders Cheerfully Filled-Free Delivery Call 1-1280

BAMMAN'S

OF PRINCETON, Inc.

10 Nassau St. Fine Food Merchants

New Frozen Food Items

TO HELP MAKE YOUR MEAL PLANNING EASY

Fresh Frozen Swordfish Steak Boneless 79

Fresh Frozen Rainbow Trout ., .91

Sebasco Lobster From Maine — Split,

- Dressed and Oven-Ready 1.49



HEAT 'N EAT REDl-COOKED
DINNER PLATTER

Turkey and Vegetable Platter 1 19

Swiss Steak and Mignon Sauce.

Delmonico Potatoes and Green Peas 99

Pot Roast of Beef with Jardiniere Sauce,

Potatoes .\u Gratin and Green Peas 99

We Deliver Phone 1-1280 We Deliver



Town Topivs. .\ovomber 29 - Dt'i-embcr J, J9o3 .



TOPICS OF THE r»ff A

^Continued from Page 2

into the slate and national orgon-

iMtions.

Beinard Kilgore of Snowden
Lane. President and Publisher of
The Wall Street Journal, will b<'
Ihe principal speaker. Other guWrs
of hnnor will b.- Paul R. Chestbro,
headmaslor of )hf Hun School and
mngislrale of ihe boromfh: Stale
Chamber Pn-sident Martin L. Bag-
liiiKhi; and Arthur Wittrnffver.
State Viee-Presidem. The Trenton
Junior Chapter, which aidetT in
orgflnlzfng the Princeton Jaycecs.
wTJI be represented by President
Arthur Holland, Vice-President
Waller Whalen and Director Rich-
ard Nicholson.

Men between Ihe ages ot 21 and
35 belong to the organization. The
Jaycees are carrent sponsoring a
"Voice of Democracy" contest for
high school students and a bicych'
safely contest. The latter event
will be launched with a program
Saturday morning at 10 at Prince-
ton High School to which all bicyflc-
rideis ar<' invited.

For Small Business. Mure than
75 business and profeKsional men
a»id women here have joined the
Nalional Federation of Independent
Business, wilh ihree named district
chairmen of the Pii^ceton chairter.
S»'i'\ing in that capacity will be W.
Fred Crandall. president trf 'NiHs
Colonial Bakery; Nelson Deyo,
owner of the Cummins Shop; and
Mr.s. Peg Wangler. realtor.

Member.^ of the chniHor receive
specially-prepared ballots on bills
and Issues affecting indcpendenl
onlerprise. particularly at the so-
called "smaiM buRineRK" le\'el. Tliese
aie voted each month, with the
results made known to the nation's
lawmakeis in Congress. Represent-
ative Charles R. Howell, the Mer-
eer-Burlington district member of
the House, recrtv^s the ballols from
Princeton. Ted Leonore. J1-. is fhe
ffislrict inwnager Tor the fedprdion.

25-Year Club Formed. l!;mi>loyees
(ti the University's Grounds and
Buildings Department ha\e formed
a Princeton 25-YeQr Club, il was
announced Ihis week by Samuel G.
Dm-iKon. puWicMy <'haVrman of the

Including among its memership
men who have served Princeton
for o\'w 40 yeai-s, the dluh wtll
hold its fall business meeting
Thursday. Decemtier 3 at 8 p.m. at
the Witherspoon Street lirehouse.

Ollleers of the club are: David S.
T'urney, president; E, F. Regan,
vice president; J. E. Bayles. Ireas-
urer; Rober't Cheeswnan, «p(Te-
tary; and Samuel G. Davisoti. pub-
licity.

Members nf the Grounds and
Buildings Department who are
eligible to join the 2.')-YeQr Club,
but ha\e not yet done so, lm\e been



Nylon Needed

An appeal has been made for
1.300 pounds of used nylon to
meet the cost of a new televis-
ion set for the Neuro-Psychia-
iric Institute at Skillman. The
1,300 pounds are the equivalent
of 45.000 pairs of stockings. Con-
tributions will be welcomed at
the Clothes Line on the Square;
further information may be ob-
tained from Mrs. Thoin Lord.



requested to see the secretary be-
iuv* the first meeting.

Victory Rally. The Princeton
Democratic Club will mark its vic-
tori<-s in the general elections with
a pally Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
in the No;y-ai;i Tavern. Congress-
man Charles R.. Howell will be the
principal speaker.

Thorn Lord, county democratic
chairman, will attend the meeting
at which plans for future activi-
ties will be discussed. Th^meeting
is open to members and others
who are interested.

Legion Officers Installed. Sam-
uel G. Davison has been installed
as commander of Princeton Post


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Online LibraryWard-Belmont School (1913-1951)Town Topics (Princeton), Nov. 29-Dec. 5, 1953 (Volume v.8, no.38) → online text (page 1 of 6)