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Biennial report of the Department of Archives and History of the State of West Virginia (Volume 2) online

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6. Col. Robert White, an ex-Attorney-General of the State.

7. Hon. Henry Mason Mathews, an ex-Governor of the State.

8. General John Echols, Confederate General, of Monroe county.

9. General John McCausland, Confederate General, of Mason county.

10. General William Lowther Jackson, Confederate General, of Wood
county.

11. General John Nicholas Clarkson, Confederate General, of Kanawha
county.

12. Hon. Charles Hedrick, of Kanawha county, ex-secretary of State.

13. Hon. Thayer Melvin, eminent Jurist of Wheeling.

PORTRAITS, SKETCHES, PAINTINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC. — ON REAR WALL.

1. Daniel Polsley, of Mason county, Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia,

under the Restored Government.

,2. Augustus A. Stuart, of Greenbrier county.

3. Robert Sanders Northcott, Federal General, of Harrison county.

4. Hon. Edwin Maxwell, of Harrison county.

5. Attorney-General C. C. Watts, of Kanawha county.

6. Col. Andrew Lewis, a son of General Andrew Lewis.



88 Archives and History. [W. Va.

7. Charles Dickens, painted on ship-board by Joseph H. Diss Debar, in
January, 1842.

8. Col. Charles Clendenin, prominent Mason county Pioneer.

9. Stonewall Jackson. Born at Clarksburg, Harrison county, West Vir-
ginia, in 1823.

10. Hon. Romeo H. Freer, of Ritchie county, ex-Attorney-General.

11. Hon. John L. Cole, an ex-State Librarian.

12. Albert Gallatin Jenkins, Confederate General, of Cabell county.

13. Hon. Joseph M. McWhorter, of Greenbrier county, an ex-Auditor of
State.

14. Thomas S. Riley, an ex-Attorney-General of the State.

15. Alfred Caldwell, an ex- Attorney-General of the State.

16. Frank Cox, an ex-Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

17. Hon. Henry G. Davis, an ex-United States Senator.

IS. General John S. Witcher, of Cabel lcounty, Federal Officer of the Civil
War.

19. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of Wheeling, Federal Officer of the Civil
War.

20. Patrick Fee Duffy, of Webster county, an ex-Auditor of the State

21. Isaac V. Johnson, of Barbour county, an ex-Auditor of the State.

22. Jonathan M. Bennett, of Lewis county, an ex-Auditor of Virginia.

23. Warren Miller, of Jackson county, an ex-Judge of the Supreme Court
of Appeals.

24. Thomas Boggess, of Roane county, ex-Auditor of the State.

25. Edward A. Bennett, of Cabell county, ex-Auditor of the State.

PAINTINGS.

1. A Sleeping Beauty— by Riley Fleming, of Marion county.

2. His Little Daughter— by Riley Fleming, of Marion county.

3. Mrs. John Barnes — by Riley Fleming, of Marion county.

4. Mr. John Barnes — by Riley Fleming, of Marion county.

5. Betty Zane, receiving the Powder at the siege of Fort Henry.

6. The Old Court House, at Williamsburg, Virginia.

7. Battle of Point Pleasant, Mason county, October 10, 1774.

8. Scene of the Boyhood days of Stonewall Jackson.

9. Head of White-faced Durham.

SKETCHES.

1. Home in which Stonewall Jackson was born, Clarksburg, Harrison
county.
» 2. John Brown's Fort at Harper's Ferry.

3. Sketch of Prominent Character in Kanawha Salines. By General
David H. Strother.

4. Drawing of Leaden Plate, buried by the French at Point Pleasant,
Mason county, August IS, 1749.

MISCELLANY.

In addition to the foregoing there were pack-saddles of the olden



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1908] State Histoky Exhibit. — Continued. 89



times, and much other material suggestive and illustrative of the
life of the West Virginia People in By-Gone days.

THE STATE EXHIBIT IN THE WEST VIRGINIA BUILD-
ING.

Notwithstanding the large amount of space awarded the State in
the Palace of History, it was insufficient for our Exhibit and a por-
tion of this was displayed in the West Virginia building.

The second floor had on it the best Archaeological collection that
was to be seen at the Exposition. Here too, were many implements
and utensils illustrative of the pioneer life of the olden times.
Among these w r ere spinning wheels, a plow with a wooden mould-
board from Nicholas County ; lanterns, lamps and candle-sticks with
many other articles too numerous to mention, all of which proved
to be of great interest to the generation of today.

On the walls of the lower floor were the following Portraits,
Sketches etc.

1. W. M. O. Dawson, Governor of West Virginia.

2. Arnold C. Scherr, Auditor of State.

3. Charles W. Swisher, Secretary of State.

4.' Alpheus F. Haymond, Marion county, late Judge of the Supreme
Court of Appeals.

5. William B. Mathews, present Clerk of Supreme Court of Appeals.

6. Henry C. McWhorter, Judge of Supreme Court of Appeals.

7. Henry Brannon. Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

8. George Poffenbarger, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

9. William N. Miller, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

10. Joseph M. Sanders, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

11. Clarke W. May, late Attorney-General of the State.

1. Coat of Arms of the State in Colors.

2. Making Apple Butter in West Virginia seventy-five years ago.

3. Landscape View of Blennerhassett Island.

4. Landscape View of Forest Scene in Kanawha county.

5. A Fox Chase in the Shenandoah River in the olden time; and Sequel
thereto.

It is safe to say that the display of history, archaeology, and art
material far exceeded in both quantity and interest that to be seen
in any other State Building on the Exposition Grounds.

THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE DEPART-
MENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY.

Chapter LXIV of the Act creating the Department of Archives
and History, passed February IS. 1905, provides that it shall



90 Archives and History. [W. Va.

be under the management of the Board of Public Works — which
body shall disburse all moneys on its own order which may be
appropriated for the expense of the Bureau (Department) ; — the
Auditor to issue his warrants therefor upon such vouchers as the
Board of Public Works may provide. The Department is plac2d
in charge of a person appointed by the Governor, and who is known
as the State Historian and Archivist, who shall among other duties
make a statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Depart-
ment, accompanied by such recommendations as he deems best for
the State's interest in said Department. In compliance with this
requirement, it is stated that the Legislature at its regular Session
in 1907, appropriated for the biennial period, beginning October
1, 1906, and ending September 30, 1908, the sum of $9,000.00.
See Session Acts of 1908, pp. 555, 573. The Department has no
income or source of revenues other than appropriations made by
the Legislature. The expenditures of this Appropriation are
shown in the proceedings of the Board of Public Works, and printed
by items in the Report of the Secretary of State, under the head of
"Allowances by the Board of Public Works, from October 1, 1906,
to September 30, 1908, payable out of the appropriation for State
Archives and History. ' ' From this it appears that there had been
disbursed of this appropriation of $9,000.00 for salaries, books,
furniture, and other incidental and contingent expenses, to Septem-
ber 30, 1908, the sum of $8,674.35, thus leaving in the treasury on
that date, a balance of $325.65. It should be mentioned that the
larger part of this balance had been expended but not disbursed
at the close of the fiscal year, September 30, 1908.

RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE STATE HISTORIAN AND ARCHIVIST.

The Department of Archives and History has grown since its
organization far beyond the expectation of those who created it.
Yet its work is but begun ; but if it receives a liberal patronage —
that is adequate appropriations — it will speedily become — is becom-
ing now — the most interesting institution in the State, and it will
give to West Virginia a prominent place among the States ami
Nations of the world which are now engaged in rescuing from ob-
livion the history and annals which their people have made in the
Past; and in saving and preserving that which they make now and
will make hereafter, that all may be transmitted to posterity. As
the Department grows, its needs increase: it is one of incessant
labor — no office hours — but work for all from early morning until



190S] Recommendations of the State Historian. 91

late at night. This, and only this, will produce that expansion
which should come to any section of the Department. Money will
therefore be needed to promote all these interests. Under the pro-
visions of law creating it the Department is placed under control of
the Board of Public "Works, on the orders of which body all
appropriations for it are disbursed. This is a guarantee of econ-
omical management in the expenditures of money.

The following recommendation of appropriations for the Depart-
ment for each of the fiscal years ending September 30, 1909, and
September 30, 1910, appear to be necessary to enable it to achieve
the desired results ; viz : —

For Salary of State Historian and Archivist $2,500.00

For Salary of Assistant 1,000.00

For Salary of Attendant 1,000.00

For Salary of Stenographer and Typewriting 1,000.00

For Purchase of Books, Manuscripts, and other Collections 1,500.00

For Shelving and necessary furniture 500.00

For Contingent and Incidental Expenses 500.00

For Binding Books and Papers 500.00

Inasmuch as all appropriations for the Department are to be
disbursed by the Board of Public Works, it may be said that it will
be better that the appropriations read : for salaries of employees ;
purchase of books, manuscripts and other material for the collec-
tions; building shelving, book-cases and purchase of furniture;
and contingent expenses, say $9,000.00.



APPENDIXES.



PART TWO.



LIST OF APPENDXIES.



I. West Virginians who were Members of the Virginia House of
Burgesses Before the Revolution.

II. West Virginians who were Members of the General Assemiy
of Virginia from the Year 1777 to 18C5 — That is while the
two States were one.

III. West Virginians who Occupied Seats in Virginia Conventions

WHILE THE TWO STATES WERE ONE.

IV. Some History of the Restored Government of Virginia from 1861
to 1865.

V. Historical Data Relating to the Formation of West Virginia —

The Men Who Made the State.

VI. Counties of West Virginia as they Existed in 1861, with their
Total Representation in the Making of the State.

VII. First State Officials of West Virginia — Their Nomination, Elec-
tion and Inauguration.

VIII. The Legislatures of West Virginia, — Membership and Organiza-
tion.

IX. The State Administrations of West Virginia, — Elective Civil
Officials of each.

X. The Supreme Court of Appeals, — Its Organization and Member-
ship — The State Law Library.

XL The Second Constitutional Convention of West Virginia which
Assembled at Charleston, Kanawha County, January 16, 1872,
and Adjourned April 9th ensuing.

XII. The Capitals and Capitols of West Virginia.

XIII. West Virginians who have been Members of the Federal Con-

gress since the State was Admitted into the Union.

XIV. West Virginians who were in some way Connected with the
Virginia Government while the two States were one.



96 Archives and History. [W. Va.



PREFATORY NOTE PERTAINING TO APPENDIXES.



Sources of Information — Labor of Compilation.



The material contained in the following appendixes is the result
of years of research. No source of information has been neglected.
Journals of the old Virginia House of Burgesses; of the Senate
and House Journals of the Virginia General Assembly ; of those of
the Assembly under the Restored Government of Virginia ; and of
those of the Legislature of West Virginia since it became a State;
together with Virginia Almanacs, files of newspapers and other
publications, and many public documents and manuscript records
at Richmond and at many county seats in West Virginia, the whole
covering more than a hundred years, have been widely and carefully
consulted. Who were the public men — law makers — of West Vir-
ginia who occupied seats in the House of Burgesses of Virginia
before the Revolution — that is. in the Colonial Period? Who were
the West Virginians that represented West Virginia counties in
the General Assembly of Virginia from 1776 to 1865, the period
of the Commonwealth ? Who were the West Virginians who sat in
all the Virginia conventions from 1775 to 1865, inclusive? Who
were the West Virginians that were in some way connected with the
Virginia Government while the two States were one? Who were
the West Virginians that composed the Conventions of the People
of Northwestern Virginia, at Wheeling in 1861? Who were they
that reorganized the Restored Government of Virginia, and thus
provided a way for the formation of West Virginia? Who were
they who have made its laws and controlled the destiny of the
State from that time to the present? Who were the West Vir-
ginians that, as members of the National Congress, have given to
their State a name and standing among her sister Commonwealths ?
All these questions, with many others, are answered in the following
pages. The labor of compilation has been tedious and prolonged,
but the work has been done with care and. as is believed, is as
accurate as it will ever be possible to make it.



APPENDIX I.



WEST VIRGINIANS WHO WERE MEMBERS OF THE

VIRGINIA HOUSE OF BURGESSES BEFORE

THE REVOLUTION.



1754 TO 1775.



INTRODUCTORY.



In 1492, Christopher Columbus made known to Europe the ex-
istence of a New World, and immediately all nations from the
Mediterranean to Scandinavia, engaged in trans-Atlantic Voyage
and Discovery. This continued for more than a hundred years,
but the sixteenth century closed, and if we except San Augustine,
no white man had found a home from the everglades of Florida
to the pine-clad hills of Nova Scotia. But this was not to con-
tinue. The 10th of April, 1606, was a great day in the History
of the New World. On that date King James I. of England
granted a charter, or letters patent, to an association of men of
his kingdom, known as the "Virginia Company of London," by
the provisions of which they were authorized to plant a colony on
the shores of Virginia, in North America. Three small vessels
— the "Susan Constant," the "God-Speed," and the "Discovery"
— were secured and anchored at Blackwall, in Middlesex County,
on the Thames river three and one-half miles above London, where
one hundred and five men went aboard as Colonists bound for the
New World. The Ocean was crossed, the James river ascended
for fifty miles, and on a peninsula on its right bank, on the 13th
day of May, 1607, these Middlesex men went on shore and laid
the foundation of Jamestown, the first English town in America.

West Virginia was not included in the first grant to the Vir-
vinia Company— that of 1606 — but it was embraced within the



98 Archives a.nd History. [W. Va.

chartered limits as enlarged in 1609; and henceforth for two hun-
dred and fifty years the two Virginias — Virginia and "West Vir-
ginia — were one.

English Settlements spread along the James river, until in 1619,
they were divided into eleven sub-divisions called boroughs; each
was then instructed to elect representatives, called burgesses, to con-
stitute a Legislative body — the first in America — called the House
of Burgesses. There was no Senate or Upper House, the Governor
and his Council performing the functions of such a body. The
House of Burgesses — the first Legislative body in America — was
organized in 1619, and continued to be the law-making body of
Virginia, throughout all its Colonial Period, even to the beginning
of the Revolution.

In 1634, Virginia, was divided into eight counties, or shires,
similar to those of England. An effort was made to keep Civil
Government abreast of the most adventurous pioneers, and hence
provision was made for the formation of new counties. In 1734,
thirty-two counties— all east of the Blue Ridge — had been check-
ered on the Map of Virginia. To these in 1738. were added
Augusta, and Fredrick Counties, west of that Mountain barrier.

The First Two West Virginia Counties. — The only repre-
sentative units in West Virginia during the existence of the old
House of Burgesses, were Hampshire county, organized in com-
pliance with an Act passed by that body in November, 1753,—
-twenty-seventh year of the reign of King George II. — and Berke-
ley county, created by an Act of February, 1772. — twelfth year
of King George III. Their representatives in the House of Bur-
gesses were as follows :

(session beginning vugust 22, M'A.)
Hampshire County. — Gabriel Jones and Parker.

(SESSION BEGINNING AUGUST 5, 17."");"). )

Hampshire County. — Gabriel Jones and Parker.

(session beginning march 25, 1756.)
Hampshire County. — Thomas Bryan Martin and Thomas Walker.

(session beginning april 30, 17r>7.)
Hampshire County. — Thomas Bryan Martin and Thomas Walker.

(session beginning march 30. 1758.)
Hampshire County. — Thomas Bryan Martin and Thomas Walker.

(SESSIONS BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 14, AND NOVEMBER 9. 1758.)

Hampshin County. — Gabriel Jones and Thomas Walker.



3908] West Virginias in House of Burgesses. 99



(SESSION BEGINNING FEBRUARY 22, 1759.)

Hampshire County. — Gabriel Jones and Thomas Walker.

(SESSION* BEGINNING NOVEMBER 1, 1759.)

Hampshire County. — Gabriel Jones and Thomas Walker.

(session of 1760 and 1761.)
Hampshire County. — Gabriel Jones and Thomas Walker.

(SESSION BEGINNING NOVEMBER 3, 1761.)

Hampshire County. — James Keith and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING MARCH 30, 1762.)

Hampshire County. — James Keith and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING NOVEMBER 2, 1762.)

Hampshire Count;/. — James Mercer and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING MAY 19, 1763.)

Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING JANUARY 12, 1764.)

Hampshirt County. — James Mercer and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING OCTOBER 30, 1764.)

Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSION BEGINNING MAY" 1, 1765.)

Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Thomas Rutherford.

(SESSK)X OF OCTOBER, 1765.)

Hampshire County.*- —r—

(SESSION BEGINNING NOVEMBER 6, 1766.)

Hampshiri County. — Thomas Rutherford and .lames Mercer.

(SESSION BEGINNING MARCH 12, 1767.)

Hampshirt County. — Thomas Rutherford and James Mercer.

(SESSION BEGINNING MARCH 31, 1768.)

Hampshiri County. — Thomas Rutherford and James Mercer.

(session of may, 1769.)
Hampshire Co unty. — Abraham Hite and -lames Mercer.

(SESSION BEGINNING NOVEMBER 7. 1769.)

Hampshiri County. — Abraham Hite and James Mercer.

»N BEGINNING MAY 21. 177<>.i

Hampshin County. — Abraham Hite and James Mercer.

SESSION BEGINNING JULY 11. 1771.)

Hampshiri County. — Abraham Bite and .lames Mercer.



■-■-]\w\ an iuipi st of the membership of this Assembly is in existence, and

the names of the representatives from this county do no1 appear therein.



393353



100 Archives and History. [W. Va.

m ' ■ ■ ' • ■ i - ■ ■ 1

(SESSION BEGINNING FEBRUARY 10, 1772.)

Berkeley County. — Robert Rutherford and Thomas Hite.
Hampshire County. — Alexander White and James Mercer.

(SESSION BEGINNING MARCH 4, 1773.)

Berkeley County. — Robert Rutherford and Thomas Hite.
Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Joseph Nevill.*

(SESSION BEGINNING MAY 5, 1774.)

Berkeley County. — Robert Rutherford and Thomas Hite.
Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Joseph Nevill.

(SESSION BEGINNING JUNE 1, 1775.)

{Berkeley County. — Robert Rutherford and John Hite.
Hampshire County. — James Mercer and Joseph Nevill.



The Revolution began in 1775, and on Saturday the 24th day of
June of that year, the House of Burgesses adjourned never to
meet again. Henceforth for two years, the government of Vir-
ginia was administered by a body known as the Committee of
Safety; and in this time the Colonial form of Government was
exchanged for that of the Commonwealth.



♦Mr. Nevill was elected in place of Alexander White who had been appointed
to the office of Deputy King's Attorney. White was the first member of the National
Congress from the territory now embraced in West Virginia. He served in that
body from March 4, 1791, to March 3, 1793. His home was in Martinsburg, Berke-
ley County. (See 'First Biennial Report of this Department, p. 182.)



APPENDIX II.



WEST VIRGINIANS WHO AVERE MEMBERS OF THE GEN-
ERAL ASSEMBLY OF VIRGINIA FROM 1777 TO
1865— THAT IS, WHILE THE TWO
STATES WERE ONE.



Virginia was the first of the American States to frame and
adopt a Constitution. The old order of things had passed away ;
the Colonial System was at an end ; and Virginia, now rising to
the dignity of a sovereign State, hastened to prepare a form of
organic law as a basis upon which to found future legislation.
A Convention for this purpose assembled in the old Colonial Cap-
itol at Williamsburg, May 6, 1776, — the year of Independence-
and having completed its work, adjourned June 29th, ensuing. The
Constitution thus prepared was unanimously adopted on that day,
and continued to be the organic law of Virginia for fifty-four
years. On the date of its adoption, Patrick Henry took the oath
of office as the first Governor, and the machinery of Government
— legislative, executive, and judicial — of the new Commonwealth,
was put into operation. Article IV. of this Constitution declared
that the Legislative Department should consist of two distinct
branches, which together should be a complete Legislature, to be
called the General Assembly of Virginia. One of these was des-
ignated as the House of Delegates, the membership of which was
composed of two representatives from each county, and one each
from the boroughs of Williamsburg and Norfolk. The other
House was called the Senate. It consisted of twenty-four mem-
bers, there being one from each of the twenty-four Districts into
which the Commonwealth was divided. Senators were divided
into four classes of six members each, and so chosen that one
class expired annually. Senators were required to be not less than
tw T enty-five years of age at the time of their election, and to be
residents within the Districts represented. All bilk; were required
to originate in the House of Delegates to be approved or rejected
by the Senate, or to be amended with the consent of the House
of Delegates; except money bills which in no instance could be



102



Archives and History.



[W. Va.



altered by the Senate, which body could only wholly approve or
reject them. The Sessions of the General Assembly were held
Annually, and the bare names if nothing more, of "West Virginians
who occupied seats in that body throughout the long period in
which the two States were one, must prove of much interest to all
West Virginians now and hereafter. That these may be known it is
necessary that we have a chronological list of "West Virginia
Counties existing and created within this period. These were as
follows :



NAME WHEN

Hampshire Nov.

Berkeley Feb.

Monongalia Oct.

Ohio Oct.

Greenbrier Oct.

Harrison May

Hardy Oct.

Randolph Oct.

Pendleton Dec.

Kanawha Nov.

Brooks Nov.

Wood Dec.

Monroe Jan.

Jefferson Jan.

Mason Jan.

Cabell Jan.

Tyler Dec.

Lewis Dec.

Nicholas Jan.

Preston Jan.

Morgan Feb.

Pocahontas Dec.

Logan Tan.

Jackson Mar.

Fayette Feb.



FORMED




17.".::.




1772.




1770.




177G.




1777.




17S4.




17S5.




1786.


4,


1787.


14.


1788.


, 30,


1700,


21,


1798.


14,


1799.


8,


3801,


o


1804.


•»


1809.


16,


1814,


is,


1836


30,


1818


19,


3838


9,


1820


21.


3823


12.


1824


1


1 83 I


28,


3833



NAME WHEN FORMED

Marshall Mar. 3 2, 3835.

Braxton Jan. 35, 1836.

Mercer Mar. 1 7, 1837.

Marion Jan. 14. 1842.

Wa yne Jan. 38, 3842.

Barbour Mar. 3, 1843.

Ritchie Feb. 18,1843.

Taylor Jan. 19, 1844.

Doddridge Feb. 4, 1845.

Gilmer Feb. 3, 1845.

Wetzel Jan. 30, 3846.

Boone Mar. 11, 3847.

Putnam Mar. 3 3 , 3848.

Wirt Jan. 39, 1848.

Hancock Jan. 15,1848.

Raleigh Jan. 23, 1 850.

Wyoming Jan. 26. 1850.

1 rpshur , Mar. 26, 1 851.

Pleasants Mar. 29, 1851.

Calhoun Mar. 5, 1855.



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