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College at Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was admitted to the bar in Middlebourne
in the latter year. In 1860-1-2-3 he was the editor of the Virginia Plaindealer,
published at Middlebourne. In 1863, he was nominated at the "Parkersburg Union
Convention" for the office of Secretary of State : was the youngest of the eight
nominees of that Convention and is now the last survivor. ' In 1S64. he was ap-
pointed a brigadier-general by Governor Pierpont. After the formation of West
Virginia he served three times as County Superintendent of Free Schools of Tyler
County. In 1879, he removed to Mentor, Campbell county. Kentucky, where he* en-
gaged in the practice of law and where he now resides. In 1861. he wedded Landora
Fitz-AIlen, a daughter of William Swan of Middlebourne, and the issue was one son,
now engaged in business in Marietta, Ohio.
p. 75.)

tfThe Tarr family is of Prussian origin. Peter Tarr, the American emigrant
ancestor, came to Pennsylvania near the close of the Revolutionary War: about
the year 1800, he removed and settled on King's Creek, then in Brooke, but now
Hancock county. West Virginia, where he established the first iron smelting estab-
lishment west of the Alleghenies. His eldest son, William, wedded Mary, a daugh-
ter of James Perry, veteran of the Revolution, and engaged in business, in Wells-
burg. Brooke county ; where on January 8, 1819, Campbell, the subject of this sketch
was born. He received his early training from his mother, who was an educated,
cultured lady, and obtained his business experience in the mercantile house of
his father. A student of books, men and environment, he became a leader of pub-
lic opinion, and when the crisis of 1860 came the voters of Brooke county, elected
him to represent them in the Convention at Richmond in 1861. in which he opposed
and voted against the Ordinance of Secession. He served two years as Treasurer
nf the Commonwealth, under the Restored Government, and was then elected the
Treasurer of the new State of West Virginia. In 1865 he returned to private life,
on his farm near Wellsburg, where he died, December 22, 1879, leaving issue five
children — one son and four daughters.



£ Samuel Crane, the first Attditor under the Restored Government, and the
first one to fill that office in West Virginia, was born at Richmond Virginia : when
but a boy he came to Tucker county where he grew to manhood. He married
a lady from near Richmond, and removed to Beverley, Randolph county, where he
practiced law until the beginning of the Civil War. when he became an active New
State man ; and as such, represented the Randolph-Tucker District in the Second
Wheeling Convention. While a member of this body he was elected, July 9, 1861,



222 Archives and History. [W. Va.

but he declined and Mr. Crane was nominated almost unanimously.

For the office of Attorney General, George McC. Porter presented
the name of AquilaBolton Caldwell, J J of Wheeling; and Chapman
J. Stuart that of Edwin Maxwell of Doddridge. Mr. Caldwell was
nominated.

Next in order was the nomination of three Judges to compose the
Supreme Court of Appeals. Daniel Peck presented the name ot
Benjamin H. Smith, of Kanawha; William H. Douglas that of
Robert Kercheval, of Ritchie; E. M. Fitzgerald that of James H.
Brown, of Kanawha ; William B. Zinn that of William G. Brown ol'
Preston ; Leroy Kramer that of Ralph L. Berkshire, of Monongalia ;
Loyd Moore that of William A. Harrison of Clarksburg ; and Camp-
bell Tarr that of Peter G. Van Winkle of Parkersburg. A vote was
taken and Berkshire, Harrison and Brown of Kanawha, were found
to be nominated.

Thus was nominated the first State ticket in West Virginia. Ail
nominations were made unanimous. Of the nominees, four — Bore-
man, Berkshire, Harrison and Caldwell — had been Whigs; and
four — Boyer, Crane, Tarr, and Brown— had been Democrats; now
all alike were loyal New State Men, working for its success and the
preservation of the Union. An Executive Committee with power tn
fill vacancies on the ticket should any occur, was appointed. It
consisted of Benjamin H. Smith, of Kanawha, as Chairman, William
E. Stevenson of Wood; and Chapman J. Stuart of Doddridge. On
motion of William E. Stevenson the loyal papers of the State were
requested to publish the proceedings, and then the Convention — the
first nominating State Convention that ever assembled in West
Virginia — adjourned sine die. The delegations going up the Ohio
left Parkersburg at 5 :00 P. M. on the steamer "Eagle", to Marietta.



Auditor of Virginia under the Restored Government. It is to his official report
that we are indebted for much of our knowledge of the financial history of that
time. He was prominently mentioned in connection with the nomination for first
Governor, but that honor went to Arthur I. Boreman. and he was nominated and
elected as the first Auditor of West Virginia. His wife died in Wheeling in 1863,
and in 1866, he removed to Missouri to assume the management of the family and
property of a deceased brother. Soon after he entered the ministry of .the Metho-
dist Episcopal Church, in which he continued until his death, which resulted from
exposure to inclement weather while conducting revival exercises. His only child
was a daughter who wedded James Shriver of Wheeling. Soon after she died, leav-
ing a little son, that was killed under a street car in that city.



$|Aquila Bolton Caldwell was a representative of one of the oldest and most
influential families of the Northern Pan-Handle. His Grandfather, James Caldwell,
settled in the vicinity of Wheeling in 1777 — the darkest of the Revolution — and his
father, Joseph, born that year, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and long Presi-
dent of the Exchange Bank of Wheeling. He wedded May Tarnall of Winchester,
Virginia, and had issue ten children, one of whom was Aquila B., the subject of this
sketch. He was educated for the law ; rose rapidly in its practice. He wedded
Matilda Newman of the Pan-Handle. He made an excellent Attorney-General and
an efficient member of the Board of Public Works. He was Attorney-General again
in 1869-70.



1908]



First State Officials of West Virginia.



22;;



where they were transferred to the "Iowa". From Marietta the
correspondent of the Wheeling Intelligencer, who had been in at-
tendance at the Convention, sent a telegram to his paper, giving the
names of the nominees, and a few minutes thereafter, an extra edi-
tion informed the people of Wheeling of the result of the work of
the Convention.

On the 12th of May ensuing, Daniel Lamb, James W, Paxtoa,
Peter G. Van Winkle, E. H. Caldwell, and E. B. Hall, the Execu-
tive Committee, of the Constitutional Convention, issued a Proclama-
tion declaring May 28th as the date upon which an election for the
choice of State officials should take place. Accordingly polls were
opened throughout the State, with the following results: —

OFFICIAL RETURNS OF THE VOTE FOR OFFICERS OF THE STATE OF WEST
VIRGINIA, SO FAR AS RECEIVED, JUNE 12, 1863.



7,

Counties a

-



o 3
&g

- EH

^<

Barbour 770

Boone 102

Braxton 212

Brooke 678

Doddridge 742

Gilmer 289

Hampshire 135

Hancock 418

Hardy 91

Harrison 2037

.Tackson 534

Kanawha 655

Lewis 1184

Marion 1428

Marshall 2067

Mason 747

Mononzalia 1585

Morgan 261

Ohio 2905

Pendleton 161

Pleasants 230

Preston 1639

Putnam 232

Randolph 239

Ritchie 667

Roane 177

Taylor 867

Tyler 720

Upshur 870

Wayne : . . . 289

Wetzel 870

Wirt 375

Wood 1603

33 Counties 25797











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102


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90


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999


90 2


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909


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675


660


669


662


673


664


665


683


742


724


735


727


739


720


287


287


286


287


244


283


243


131


131


132


133


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416


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91


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1072


2024


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525


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526


508


654


619


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594


657


658


668


1178


1181


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1178


1173


1179


1171


1404


1434


1 1 29


1426


1372


1392


1363


1999


2021


1978


2032


2064


2039


1073


74 l'


733


724


733




732


....


1562


1584


1561


1559


i 586


1545


1548


259


259


258


258


258


258


257


2875


2866


2766


2840


2876


27 SO


2737


161


161


161


161


161


161


161


211


238


237


230


239


238


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1628


1640


1 602


1614


161 t


1548


1607


224


22:5


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231


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238


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994


583


661


652


663


652


664


641


177


177


177


177


177


177


177


840


880


830


881


860


880


857


484


688


695


708


710


600


684


879


874


878


878


874


878


872


287


287


287


273


276


275


282


817


869


825


564


852


862


812


373


371


372


369


370


367


360


1540


1546


1549


1548


1558


1558


1542



24996 25513 24857 25141 24637 24024 24225



224 Archives and History. [W. Va.

The Beginning of the New State Government, June 20, 1863.

The 20th day of June 1863, was a remarkable one in the History
of the Virginias. In Wheeling a vast multitude mronged the
streets. Thousands of flags fluttered in the breeze; the display of
bunting was the most attractive ever seen in the "Western Metro-
polis. ' ' It threatened rain — June showers ; now all the beauties of
a" clear sunlight were shown, then a cloud chased all away. There
were June showers — little ones — not enough to drive the people from
the streets. A procession marched through the principal streets and
then halted in front of the Linsly Institute. It was filled with
people; the streets were filled with men. women and children, and
the yards, windows and roofs were filled with eager faces. A large
platform had been erected in front of the Institute, and thither the
officers — officials of two State Governments — were conducted as
they arrived. Hon. Chester D. Hubbard called the multitude to
order. Thirty-five tastefully attired and beautiful little girls, rep-
resenting the American States, sang the "Star Spangled Banner."
Rev. J. T. McLure addressed the Throne of Grace. Then came
two Governors — Franci.s II. Pierpont, the bend of the 'Restored
Government,' and Arthur I Boreman, chief Executive of a State
just then beginning to be. The first delivered a Valedictory, the
second an Inaugural Address. The sovereignty of the Restored
Government of Virginia was terminated on the soil of West Vir-
ginia. Governor Pierpont retired with the Restored Government
to Alexandria. Three cheers were given for West Virginia; the
little girls sang E Pluribus TJnwm; the band played the "Star
Spangled Banner,'' and thus terminated the ceremonies of the
inauguration of West Virginia as a free and independent State.




Hon. Arthur Ingram Boreman.
First Governor of West Virginia. (See Biographical Notice, p. 220.)



APPENDIX VIII.



THE LEGISLATURE OF WEST VIRGINIA— MEMBERSHIP

AND ORGANIZATION.



Under the provisions of the first Constitution of the State — 1863
to 1872 — the Legislature met annually and State Senators were elect-
ed for a term of two years; and members of the House of Delegates
for one year. Under the present Constitution — 1872 to the present
time — the Legislature meets biennially ; State Senators are elected for
a term of four years; and members of the House. of Delegates for two
years.

Then and Now. — It is nearly forty-seven years since the meeting
of the First Legislature, in the Linsly Institute Building, in "Wheel-
ing, at twelve o'clock, high noon, June 20, 1863. Then there were
nine Senatorial Districts and. the Senate consisted of eighteen
members; then there were forty -eight counties, and forty-seven
members representing counties and Delegate Districts. Since then
two counties — Berkeley and Jefferson — have been added, and five
others — Mineral, Lincoln, Grant, Summers and Mingo — have been
created, thus increasing the number to fifty-five. Since then the
number of Senatorial Districts has been increased to fifteen. Since
then the number of members of the House of Delegates has been
increased from forty-seven to eighty-six; and the number of Sen-
ators from eighteen to thirty — membership in both Houses nearly
doubled. Then the subjects of legislation were few; for there were
then no public institutions and no material development ; and
Sessions of the Legislature attracted comparatively little attention.
Now how different ! Not quite a half century gone, but the growth
and development of the State have surprised the Nation and en-
listed almost world-wide interest. This has brought with it vastly
increased needs of legislation, and a Session of the Legislature,
with its more than a hundred members and attaches, presents a



226 Archives and History. [W. Va.

busy scene and attracts wide interest. The changes which have
taken place in the Legislature indicate the progress and develop-
ment made by the State.

The Journals of the Legislature. — The Transactions and Pro-
ceedings of the Senate and House of Delegates are printed in the
''Senate Journals" and "House Journals," a volume for each
House. There have been twenty-eight Regular Sessions — ten An-
nual and eighteen Biennial. In addition thereto separate volumes
of the Journals have been printed for five Extra Sessions — those of
1868, 1887, 1890, 1904 and 1908— those for other extra, extended,
or adjourned Sessions having been printed as appendixes to the
Journals of preceding regular Sessions. Thus it will be seen that
the Legislative History of the State is comprised in sixty-six bound
volumes of Journals — thirty-three of the Senate and thirty-three
of the House — and if we would acquaint ourselves with that His-
tory we must consult these volumes — many of them ponderous
ones. This has been done in the preparation of the following
material; and some interesting facts have been presented. From
June 20, 1863, to January, 1879, a period including thirteen Leg-
islatures or regular Sessions — ten Annual and three Biennial — the
rolls of the membership are full, containing as they do, with slight
exceptions the name, age, nativity, occupation, postoffice and res-
idence county of each member. From January 8, 1879, to January
13, 1899, a period in which there were ten Biennial Legislatures —
there is, with the exception of that of 1891, a total absence of data
relating to the membership, save that the names, with counties or
districts represented, are given. From January 11, 1899. to 1908.
a period in which there were four biennial sessions, the data given
in connection with the membership of both Houses is again full and
well arranged.

Throughout the long period, from 1779 to 1899, the only sources
of information as to the membership (that of 1891 excepted) con-
sist of the enrollment on the first day of the Session of members
"who appear to have been elected," and the Report of the Com-
mittee on Privileges and Elections; it being difficult in some in-
stances, to determine the county or district represented by the
persons named. In the Session of 1881, it is impossible to ascertain
the residence county of Senators, and the rule seems to have been
to give initials instead of the full given names of members. For
the years 1881 and 1883, the list of Senators has to be made up
from the Journals of these two Sessions, each Journal containing



1908]



The Legislature of West Virginia.



227



the names of new Senators, but not those of hold-over members,
either by Counties or Districts.

Such is a notice in brief of the Journals — sixty-six volumes —
of the Legislature ; and they contain the Legislative History of the
State for nearly a half century. Neither time nor labor has been
spared in consulting them in the preparation of the following
material compiled, as is believed, as accurately as it is possible to
do it. It exhibits at a glance the names of all the law makers of
the State, with interesting facts relating to them, together with
names of attaches, and data concerning them.

THE FIRST LEGISLATURE.

(Convened at Wheeling, June 20, 1863; Adjourned December 11, 1863.)

Senators.



Name.

John H. Atkinson.
Aaron Bechtol.
John B. Bowen.
John J. Brown.
Edward C. Bunker.
James Burley.
James Carskadon.
William H. Copley.
D. D. T. Farnsworth.
Aaron Hawkins.
E>aniel Haymond.
Chester P. Hubbard.
Edward S. Mahon.
Edwin Maxwell.
Thomas K. McCann.
John M. Phelps.
Wm. D. Rollyson.
Greenbury Slack.
Win. E. Stevenson
Samuel Young

John M. Phelps
President,

Ellery R. Hall,
Clerk,

Edmund Kyle,

Kerpeant-at-arms.

W. M. DUNN'INGTON",

Door-keeper.
Charles H. Wheat.
Alex. R. Campbell,

Pages.



Lewis Ballard
John S. Barnes.
James I. Barrick.
Ephrai'm Bee.
John Boggs.
George C. Bowyer.
Lewis Bumgardner.
Thomas Copley.
Wm. L. Crawford.
Horatio N. Crooks.
II. W. Crothers.
L. E. Davidson
S. R. Dawson.
W. S. Dunbar.



Lge


Occupation - .


Nativity.


District. Post-office.


43.


Brick Man'f.


Ohio.


1st.


New Cumberland


53.


Stageman.


Virginia.


10th


Berkeley Springs.


45.


Farmer.


Virginia.


8th.


Buffalo Shoals.


38.


Lawyer.


Virginia.


3d.


Kingwood.


35.


Farmer.


N. T. City.


3d.


Morgantown.


02.


Farmer.


Pennsylvania.


2d.


Moundsville.


44.


Farmer.


Virginia.


10th.


New Creek.


43.


Merchant.


Virginia.


8th.


Guyandotte.


43.


Merchant.


New York.


6th.


Buckhannon.


<;r..


Farmer.


Pennsylvania,


2d.


Basnettsville.


70.


Farmer.


Virginia.


4th.


Federal Hill.


4S.


Banker.


Connecticut.


1st.


Wheeling.


47.


Farmer.


Maryland.


5th.


Ravenswood.


P.. - ).


Lawyer.


Virginia.


4th.


Clarksburg.


38.


R. R. Con'tr.


New York.


9th.


Middle Ferry Brook.


42.


Minister.


Virginia.


9th.


Point Pleasant.


26.


Land Agent.


Virginia.


6th.


Braxton C. H.


55.


Farmer.


Virginia.


7th.


Kanawha C. H.


45.


Farmer.


Pennsylvania


5th.


Parkersburg.


35.


Minister.


Virginia.


9th.


Edray.


42.


Minister.


Virginia.


7th.


*
Point Pleasant.


20.


Lawyer.


Virginia.


....


Fairmont.




Farmer.


Pennsylvania




Pine Grove.


C.2.


Carpenter.


Virginia.




Fairmont.


15.


Student.


California.




Wheeling


15.


Student.


Iowa.


....


Wheeling.




Delegates.






37.


Merchant.


Virginia.


Monroe.


Lindside.


47.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Marion.


Fairmont.


30.


Merchant.


Virginia.


Hampsh


ire. New Creek.


60.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Doddrid


ge. Oxford.


49.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Pendleton. Senaca.


31.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Putnam


Winfleld.


47.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Mason.


Hartford City.


61.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Wayne.


Falls of Tug.


36.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Haneocli


:. Freeman's Land'g.


02.


Farmer


Pennsylvania


.Wood.


Belleville.


4."..


Merchant.


Ohio.


Brooke.


Wellsburg.


40.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Taylor.


Flemington.


30.


Minister


Maryland.


Ritchie.


Ellenboro.


40.


Carpenter.


Virginia.


Raleigh.


Raleigh C. H.



228



Archives and History.



[W. Va.



Name.

Michael Dunn.
Solomon S. Fleming.
Alfred Foster.
John C. Gillilan.
Nathan Goff Sr.
Benoni Griffin.
Robert Hagar.
Perry M. Hale.
James H. Hinchman.
Isaac Holman.
David J. Keeney.
Cyrus Kittle.
Leroy Kramer.
Daniel Lamb.
Thomas Little.
John B. Lough.
Andrew W. Mann.
James C. McGrew.
J. M. McWhorter.
John Michael.
Spicer Patrick.
Anthony Rader.
S. I. Robinson.
Andrew F. Ross.
Lewis Ruffner.
George W. Sheetz.
W. W. Shriver.
Felix Sutton.
Daniel Sweeny.
Joseph Teter, Jr.
Jacob Teter.
Joseph Turner.
Peter G. Van Winkle.
Joseph S. Wheat.
William T. Wiant.
Edward D. Wright.
William B. Zinn.



Age. Occupation.



48. Merchant.
50. Merchant.
43. Merchant.
43. Farmer.

65. Banker

49. Farmer.
53. Minister
3G. Hatter
45. Farmer.
53. Farmer
40. Merchant.

43. Farmer.

44. Merchant

53. Lawyer

45. Farmer.

50. Farmer.
20. Farmer.
48. Merchant.
35. Clerk of Ct.

46. Farmer.
70. Physician.

52. Physician.
37. Farmer

47. Teacher.

66. Salt Man'f.
39. Carpenter

54.

61 . Farmer

53. Minister.
35. Farmer.
37. Farmer.
53. Farmer.

55. Lawyer.
60 Farmer.
30. Merchant.
52. Farmer.

65. Flour Merchant.



Nativity.

Virginia.
Virginia.
Virginia.
Virginia.

New York.
Virginia.
Virginia.

Virginia
Virginia



County. Post-office.



Marshall.

Harrison.

Wirt.

Greenbrier,

Harrison.



Moundsville.
Shinnston.
Newark.
Falling Springs.
Clarksburg.



Spicer Patrick,

Speaker, 70. Physician

Granville D. Hall,

Clerk, 25- Reporter.

Sylvanus W. Hall,

Assistant Clerk, 25. Clerk.
S. G. W. Morrison,

Sergeant-at-arms, 45 Foundryman.
Wm. W. Holliday,

Door-keeper, 63.

John K. Duncan. 16. Student.

Reuben J. Bullard,

Pages. 14. Student.



Pocahontas. Beech Bottom.



Boone. Kanawha C. H.

Lewis. Weston.

Logan. Rich Creek.

Pennsylvania.Marion. Palatine.

Virginia. Jackson. Ravenswood.

Virginia. Randolph. Beverly.

Pennsylvania. Monongalia. Morgantown.

Pennsylvania. Ohio. Wheeling.



Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

New York.

Virginia.



Mercer. Frenchville.
Monongalia. Arnettsville.
Greenbrier. Falling Springs.



Preston.

Roane.

Hardy.

Kanawha.

Nicholas.



Pennsylvania. Wetzel.
Pennsylvania. Ohio.
Virginia. Kanawha.

Virginia.

Maryland. Ohio.
Dis. Columbia. Braxton.
Pennsylvania. Tyler.



Kingwood.
Spencer.
New Creek.
Charleston.
Summersville.
New Martinsville.
West Liberty.
Kanawha Salines.



Hampshire. Piedmont.
Wheeling.



H.



Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

New York.

Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.

Virginia.



Barbour.

Upshur.

Marshall.

Wood.

Morgan.

Gilmer.

Cabell.

Preston.



Braxton C.
Sistersville.

Belington.
Peck's Run.
Moundsville.

Parkersburg.
Sir John's Run.
Glenville.
Guyandotte.
Zinn's Mills.



New Y'ork. Kanawha. Kanawha C. H.

Virginia. Wheeling.

Virginia. Fairmont.

Maryland Wheeling.

Pennsylvania Wheeling

Pennsylvania Morgantown.

Virginia. Wheeling.



THE SECOND LEGISLATURE.



(Convened at Wheeling, January 19, 1864. Adj


ourned








Senators.




John II. Atkinson.


44.


Brick Man


f. Ohio.


1st.


Aaron Bechtol.


54.


Stageman.


Virginia.


10th.


John B. Bowen.


46.


Farmer.


Virginia.


Sth.


John J. Brown.


39.


Lawyer.


Virginia.


3r.


Edward C. Bunker.


36.


Lawyer.


N. Y. Citv.


3d.


James Burley.


62.


Farmer.


Pennsylvania.


2d.


James Carskadon.


44-


Farmer.


Virginia.


10th.


William H. Copley.


44.


Merchant.


Virginia.


Sth.


William S. Dunbar.


40.


Carpenter.


Virginia.


9th.


Dan. D. T. Farnsworth.


45.


Merchant.


New York


6th.


Aaron Hawkins.


65.


Farmer.


Pennsylvania.


Jd.


Daniel Haymond.


76.


Farmer.


Virginia.


4th


Chester D. Hubbard.


40.


Banker.


Connecticut.


1st.


Edward S. Mahon.


47.


Farmer.


Maryland.


5th.



March 3, 1864.)



NewCumberland.

Berkeley Springs.

Buffalo' Shoals

Kingwood.

Morgantown.

Mounds\ille.

New Crtek.

Guyandotte.

Raleigh C. II.

Buckhannon.

Basnettsville.

Federal Hill.

Wheeling.

Ravenswood.



1908]



Tin: Legislatube of West Virginia.



229



Name.

Edwin Maxwell.



Online LibraryWest Virginia. Dept. of Archives and HistoryBiennial report of the Department of Archives and History of the State of West Virginia (Volume 2) → online text (page 23 of 35)