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West Virginia Wesleyan College Catalog: 1934-1935 (Volume 1934-1935) online

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students who expect to be art teachers or sup-
ervisers in public schools. Practice in freehand
drawing or simple objects in pencil and crayon on
paper; blackboard drawing; artistic anatomy;
principles of perspective study of color ; weaving ;
soap carving and construction work.
Time to be arranged 2 Hrs.

301, 302 INTERPRETATION OF ART— A further

consideration of the principles of Art and their

relation to every day living.

Time to be arranged 2 Hrs.

303, 304 ADVANCED PAINTING — Continuation of

Courses 105, 106.

Time to be arranged 2 Hrs.

401, 402 ADVANCED PAINTING— Continuation of

Courses 303, 304.

Time to be arranged 2 Hrs.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

Mr. Wonnberger, Mr. Muzzy, Mr. Kingsburg.
The chief aims of the Department of Music may
be summed up as follows : Mental discipline, moral
health and strength, spiritual development, phy-
sical coordination and control, general culture,
and specific training for professional musicians
and teachers.

ELIGIBILITY

All music courses except those in Applied Music



58 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

(111, 112, etc.) are open to all students regularly
enrolled in the College without extra fee.

Because of the sequential arrangement of the
technical courses and in order to secure and
maintain a proper balance with general college
requirements, all majors and minors in this sub-
ject should confer with the instructor before reg-
istering.

101 PUBLTC SCHOOL MUSIC— A study of nota-
tion; major and minor scales; time figures; com-
mon terminology; intervals; and a study of the
common chords and cadences.

MW 1:15 2 Hrs.

102 PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC— The study of the
fundamentals of public school music; its pre-
sentation and the problems arising in this field of
work; classroom management.

MW 1:15 2 Hrs.

103, 104 EAR TRAINING AND SIGHT SINGING
Sight singing exercises, introducing the com-
mon problem of pitch and rhythm, are given in
all major and minor keys; dictation exercises;
exercises in complicated rhythms and divisions of
simple and compound measures; melodic and
harmonic dictation.
TT 10:15 2 Hrs.

107, 108 HARMONY— A Study of the triads in the
major and minor scales, and their inversions. The
dominant seventh chord, its inversins; exrcises
in simple resolutions; the dominant ninth chord;
secondary seventh chords and their inversions.
TT 8 :45 2 Hrs.

201, 202 COUNTERPOINT— Simple counterpoint in
first, second and third species; Double counter-
Point. 2 Hrs.



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 69

207, 203 HARMONY— ADVANCED^-The study of
chromatic tones; augmented and altered chords,
enharmonic changes; irregular resolution of the
dominant seventh chord : modulation.
MW 1*15 2 Hrs.

209, 210 HISTORY OF MUSIC— A study of the devel-
opment of Music from the early Egyptians to the
advent of Beethoven. Romanticism; Wagner and
the new operatic tendencies. Modem Music.
MWF 7 :45 3 Hrs.

301, 302 KEYBOARD HARMONY— Practical ap-
plication of harmonic knowledge'. 1 Hr.
H £

305 _ HARMONIC ANALYSIS— Principles of ana-
lysis and their application to triads, seventh
chords, broken chords', reductions, modulation,
non-harmonic tones, altered chords, passing
chords, and the reduction of florid passages.

2 Hrs.

-

306 MUSIC FORM— Study of form in music both by
analysis and original exercises. Work extends
from simple two and three part forms through
the sonata amid rondo. General structure of the
fugue. 2 Hrs.

313 W 7 ESLEYAN CHOIR— A study of the most rep-
resentative sacred music from medieval to mod-
ern times. 1 Hr.

315 ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS— A theoretical
and practical application as to the technique,
possibilities and general knowledge of the instru-
ments of the Symphony Orchestra.
TT 3:15 1 Hr.

SI 6 CONDUCTING— The technique of the baton,
score reading, orchestral and band directing.
TT 3:15 1 Hr.



60 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

309, 310 ENSEMBLE— A study of ensemble litera-
ture for two pianos and chamber music for strings.
Th. 2:15 Fee $5.00 1 Hr.

321, 322 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN PUBLIC
SCHOOL MUSIC— The study of the methods of
presentation of music in the elementary and inter-
mediate grades; classroom management.
MWF 8:45 3 Mrs.

ORCHESTRA— A study of orchestral literature.
Fri. 3:15 1 Hr.

403 BEETHOVEN — An appreciative analysis and
study of the life and works of Beethoven, with
detailed illustrations. 2 Hrs.

404 MODERN MUSIC— A comprehensive survey of
the trends and scope of modern music. Con-
temporary- composers. 2 Hrs.

405, 406 ENSEMBLE— A study of ensemble litera-
ture for two pianos, piano and organ, and cham-
ber music. (Only performers). 1 Hr.

407 IMPROVISATION— Planned for organ majors to
follow keyboard harmony. 1 Hr.

408 SERVICE PLAYING— The study of an organ-
ist's duties in the church. This includes a brief
survey in Angelicam and Gregorian chant. Ideals
in church music. 1 Hr.

409, 410 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN PIANO
TEACHING — Analysis of many piano composi-
tions and technical exercises for the purpose of
supplying the teacher with purposeful material
and logical method. 1 Hr.

415 ORCHESTRATION— Arranging music to be
played in Symphony Orchestra. Making Jsyrn-
phonic scores. Scores of the Masters will be
analyzed. The student will have the opportunity
of hearing his work played.
(Time to be arranged). 1 Hr.



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 61

421 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN PUBLIC
SCHOOL MUSIC — A study of music methods as
applied to junior and senior high schools.
Time to be arranged 2 Hrs.

422 DIRECTED TEACHING OF MUSIC— Observa-
tion and teaching in the public schools.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

APPLIED MUSIC

111, 112 APPLIED MUSIC— Piano, Organ, Violin,
Voice, Orchestral Instruments.
Two hours credit. Two lessons per week
Ten hours' practice Fee $40.00

One hour credit. One lesson per week
Five hours' practice. Fee $25.00

211, 212 Applied Music (Same as above)

311, 312 Applied Music (Same as above)

411, 412 Applied Music (Same as above)

RECITALS

There will be a series of lecture-recitals through-
out the year. Every music major will be required
to take part at least once, each semester. All students
in the department will be expected to attend all music
events and recitals.

WESLEYAN CHOIR

The Wesleyan Choir will make at least one con-
cert tour each year throughout this and adjoining
states. The choir is open to all students who can
pass the competitive examination. Applicants must
interview the choir director before enrolling.

WESLEYAN ORCHESTRA

The orchestra wiill make a study of standard over-
tures, operatic transcriptions and selections from
symphonic literature. Frequent public performances
will be given.



62 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

DEPARTMENT OR PUBLIC SPEAKING
AND
PLAY PRODUCTION

Mrs. Neil

The aim of this department is to train students
to more effective citizenship through speech ability,
both in private conversation and public address; to
help the teacher with a better presentation of his
material before the class and to train especially quali-
fied students to teach speech.

201-202 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH: Study and
application of the principles of psychology upon
which effectiveness in speaking is based, includ-
ing sensation, imagination, conception, and mem-
ory, action, voice building and diction. Special
conferences with students having speech dif-
ficulties. Daily presentation of original speech
or excerpts from literature before the class.
TT 10:15 2 Hrs.

TT 11:15 2 Hrs.

TT 1 :15 2 Hrs.

207 JUVENILE LITERATURE : A study of litera-
ture for children will be made in a sufficiently
detailed way to give a good basis for the ap-
preciation and selection of material for the
grades. Poetry, fanciful tales and realistic
stories are used and the best methods of present-
ing them. Much practice in the art of story tell-
ing. The compilation of a personal story book.
Required of Standard Normal students.
TT 8:45 2 Hrs.

301 THE ART OF PUBLIC ADDRESS: Technique
of composition and delivery of various types of
speeches for formal and informal occasions. A
study of the typical speeches of America's out-
standing speakers.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 63

302 PLAY PRODUCTION— An elementary course
covering all phases of amature production. Practi-
cal experience in making scenery. By cooperation
with the Wesleyan Play Shop, opportunity is
given to coach and publically produce a number of
one act plays.
MWF 11:15 (Not given 1934-35) 3 Hrs.

313 READING — Interpreting the printed page for
silent or oral reading. Reading from modern
poetry, the Bible and adapting and cutting short
stories for the class room or public. A course
designed especially for teachers who desire to
improve their own speech ability and to create
interest in good literature through the medium
of vocal interpretation.

WF 1:15 2 Hrs.

314 ORAL INTERPRETATION — An advanced
course in dramatic readings and platform art.
Preparation of nubile programmes.

MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

319-320 FORENSICS— This h not scheduled as a
regular course, but carries credit varying ac-
cording to the time spent and the quality of work
done in preparation and participation in debates,
and oratorical and extemporaneous speaking con-
tests.
Time to be arranged 1 Hr.

401 THE AMERICAN PLATFORM— Survey of
American orators and their part in molding pub-
lic opinion and influencing American life and
progress. Each member of the class will be asked
to make an intensive study of some phase of the
general subject, and prepare and deliver a lecture
on this topic.
WF 2:15 2 Hrs



64 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

403 SPEECH COMPOSITION— Study of the theory
of oral style with reading of models of great
speeches. Much practice in speech composition.
For majors in speech only.
Hours to be arranged. 2 Hrs.

405 ADVANCED PLAY PRODUCTION— Especially
designed for teachers who wish to coaich school
and community plays. Adapting school and
church auditoriums to dramatic work emphasized.
WF 11:15 2 Hrs.

408 MODERN DRAMA— A study of representative
plays of recent times beginning with Isbem Es-
pecial emphasis on the development of the Ameri-
can stage and playwrights, as reflecting modern
thought and social change.
MWF 11:15 (Alternative years with 302) 2 Hrs.

ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE

One hour of credit is allowed each semester for
the following courses in Argumentation and Debate.

109-110
209-210
309-310
409-410

An intensive study of the fundamental principles
of argumentation and debate; analysis of the ques-
tion; choosing the issues; building the brief; gather-
ing the evidence; preparing and delivering the con-
structive speech; detecting fallacies and preparing
effective refutation; much class room practice in
debate. 1 Hr.



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION C?

SPEECH ORGANIZATION, LOCAL AND NA-
TIONAL— Two local organizations, the Forensic
Club and the Wesleyan Play Shop, offer abund-
ant opportunities for practical work in forensics
and dramatics. There are also two national
honor fraternities with local chapters in Wes-
leyan, Pi Kappa Delta, forensic fraternity, and
Alpha Psi Omega, dramatic fraternity. These
organizations are under the supervision of the
Speech Department, and eligibility for member-
ship is secured through active participation in
this department.



II — Division of Languages
and Literature

Professor Chrisman, Professor Bos, and Profes-
sor Ogden, and Miss Lazenby.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

Professor Chrisman and Miss Lazenby

The courses in English offer students the oppor-
tunity to work in three related fields: (1) in writ-
ing, (2) in journalism, and (3) in literature. Em-
phasis is laid upon both the practical and the cultural
aspects of the subject.Students desiring to teach Eng-
lish are given the training which will qualify them
to do so. The vocational aim, however, is not stress-
ed to the exclusion of those values which make for
the broadening of horizons and enrichment of life.

101-102 COMPOSITION— A study in the theory of
oral and written expression. This course provides
for weekly themes, sustained writing, lectures,
and conferences. Required of all freshmen.
MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.

MWF 10:15 3 Hrs

MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

MWF 1:15 3 Hrs.



66 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEY AN COLLEGE

307-308 JOURNALISM— Study of the methods of pro-
duction and administration of the modern news-
paper. Practical training is given in gathering
and writing news with emphasis upon news values
and the technique of the news story. The history
and ethics of Journalism. Second semester;
class-room instruction and practice in writing
special feature articles for newspapers and mag-
azines. Practice in writing various types of edi-
torials is supplemented by a study of the editorial
policies of representative newspapers and an
analysis of typical editorials.
TT 10:15 2Hrs.



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j to



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201, 202 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LITERA-
TURE — A study of the development of our Anglo-
Saxon ideals as illustrated in literature. This
course serves for some as a final survey of the
subject; for others as the basis for the further
study of special periods. Required of all students
majoring or minoring in English.
MWF 7 :45 3 Hrs.



203, 204 AMERICAN LITERATURE— A survey of
the field of American Literature, lectures, read-
ings, and class discussion. A detailed study of out-
standing authors. Special attention given to the
relation between literature and our natural life.
TT 7 :45 2 Hrs.

205 MODERN PROSE— A study of the thought of
today expressed in contemporary prose. Con-
siderable use is made of the material found in the
better type of current magazines. Students are
brought into contact with the general literature of
the times.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 67

207 MARK TWAIN AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES
— A study of Mark Twain and the literature of
his generation. The major emphasis will be upon
those aspects of literature which reflect the life
of the period. Not offered 1934-35.

TT 11:15 2 Hrs,

208 ENGLISH BIOGRAPHY— A study of biography
as a form of literature. An intensive study is
made of a number of the most famous biograph-
ies. Special stress is laid upon the relation of the
different aspects of the life of their time. Some
attention is given to recent biographical litera-
ture.

TT 11:15 2 Hrs,

30-1 SHAKESPEARE — A critical and appre-
ciative course in the Shakespearean plays. One
or two of the great tragedies are studied textu-
ally and a number of others read more generally.
Open only to juniors and seniors.
M'WF 11:15 3 Hrs.

301 ADVANCED ENGLISH GRAMMAR— A college
course in the fundamentals of grammar. Stress
is laid upon the history of the language as well
as upon contemporary usage.

TT 8 : 45 2 Hrs.

302 ENGLISH LANGUAGE— A study of the origin
and growth of the English language, its native
and foreign elements with particular attention to
vocabulary, etymology, and inflection. An effort
is made to help the student increase his vocabulary
and increase his general linguistic efficiency.

TT 8:45 2 Hrs.

305, 306 CONTEMPORARY POETRY— A study of
the most important productions of the poetry of
the present day. Special work in a selected field.
Assigned readings, class discussions, and informal
lectures.
TT 11:15 2 Hrs.



68 WEST VIRGINIA WE3LEYAN COLLEGE

401, 402 VICTORIAN LITERATURE— Emphasis is
laid upon the thought development of the nine-
teenth century. The authors to whose teachings
and influence special attention is paid are Carlyle,
Ruskin, Newman, Arnold, Browning, and Tenny-
son.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.

403, 404 WORLD LITERATURE— A general culture
course yielding an opportunity for the reading in
English of the literary masterpieces of the ancient
and modern world. Among the authors studied
intensively are Homer, Dante, and Goethe. Not of-
fered 1934-35.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.

405 EMERSON — A course in a special field of Amer-
ican literature. An intensive study is made of
Emerson and his influence upon American
thought and life. Some attention is given to other
leading figures of the transcendental movement.
Not offered 1934-35.

MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

406 THE NOVEL, DICKENS TO HARDY— A brief
resume of the development of the English novel
is given by lecture. Reading and criticism will
include Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot and
Hardy. Not offered 1934-35.

MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.



LIBRARY SCIENCE

301, 302 LIBRARY SCIENCE— A survey of library
usage and methods planned for students expect-
ing to teach in high schools, or those interested
in library work as a profession. The first semes-
ter standard works or reference, both general
and special, are studied. The second semester
is devoted to classification and cataloguing.
Reasonable facility in the use of the typewriter






DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 69

and a reading knowledge of one or more modern
languages are highly recommended.

Lecture two hours; laboratory two 'hours per

week. Lab time to be arranged.

TT 2:15 2 Hrs.

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES
Professors Ogden and Bos



101-102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH— First semester:
daily careful drill in pronunciation; regular and
most important irregular verbs in daily oral and
written exercises. McKinzie's and Hamilton's
French Grammar. Second semester: Grammar
completed.

Text; The New Chardenals Complete French

Course, Grosjean.

La Poudre \aux Yeux with questionnaire and

oral and written exercises.

MWF 1:15 3 Hrs.

MWF 2:15 3 Hrs.

201—202 FIRST SEMESTER— Continued drill in pro-
nunciation by daily oral and written exercises.
SECOND SEMESTER: Cbntinuation of the
preceding course. Particular attention to writ-
ten composition.

MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

MWF 8 :45 3 Hrs.

301 FRENCH— Oral French : Conversation and read-
ing based on types of short stories of the nine-
teenth century.

MWF 7 :45 3 Hrs.

302 FRENCH — Survey Course in French Literature
from the Middle Ages to the present time. Chin-

ard's Histoire des Lettres Franchaises.

MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.



70 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

307 FRENCH — Drama of the seventeenth century.
Anthologie de drame du 17ieme siecle. Gormeille,
Racine, Moliere.

TT 7 :45 3 Hrs.

308 FRENCH— Methods and Materials in Teaching
French. A practical course for prospective teach-
ers of French. Observation and critical work.
TT 11:15 2 Hrs.

409 FRENCH— Survey of the 18th Century of
French Literature. Text: Shintz, Histoire du
18ieme Siecle de la Litterature Franchaise.
MWF 11:15 (Not offered 1934-35) 3 Hrs.

408 FRENCH Literature from the beginning of the
19th century. Texts : Pelesiers Movements Lit-
teraries au XIX Siecle. Selections from Chat-
eau briand, Victory Hugo, Lamartine, and others
MWF 3 Hrs.

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN
Professor Bos.

The study of German should have a three-fold
objective; correct and progressive knowledge and use
of German shown principally in increased ability to
read, but also in intelligible oral and written expres-
sion, for both cultural and vocational purposes; care-
ful translator , implying understanding of German
idiom, and ability and facility in accurate use of
English; a growing interest in all phases of the life
and history of Germany and the Germans.

101—102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN— The object of
the course is to put the student in possession of
the elements of the German language. This
implies; 1-a personal command of simple German,
that is, the ability to understand such German
whether heard or read, and to employ the lan-
guage in simple conversation, narration and de-
scription, both orally and in writing; 2-a familiar-
ity with the elements of German grammar in the



DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 71

degree essential for the obtainment of this com-
mand of the language.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

201—202 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN— The aim of
this course is to extend and strengthen the stu-
dent's personal command of German both oral and
written. Reading of several suitable texts ac-
compained by drill dictation and written exercises.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.

301-302 GERMAN NOVEL— History and develop-
ment of the German novel in the nineteenth cen-
tury surveyed. Representative novels and short
stories translated. Both intensive and extensive
reading required. Prerequisite, German 101-2
and 201-2.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

303 GERMAN POETRY— German lyric and ballad
poetry with reading in class of selections from
Goethe, Schiller, Heine, and assigned parallel
reading in other poets. Representative poems
of authors memorized and interpreted. Prere-
quisite, German 101-2 and 201-2.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

401, 402 GERMAN DRAMA— Selected classical and
modern plays read. Collateral study of the Ger-
man drama of the nineteenth century. Prere-
quisite, German 301-302.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

403-404 SCIENTIFIC GERMAN— The object of this
course is to give students facility in reading
German technical literature. Recommended to
pre -medical students and others planning gradu-
ate work in the sciences. The course consists of
reading current articles in German scientific
books and periodicals.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.



72 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN
Professor Bos.

During: the entire Latin courses, by careful selec-
tion of texts and class-room procedure such immediate
and ultimate objectives as mastery of Latin as such,
knowledge of Roman life and culture and their in-
fluence upon subsequent times, literary appreciation
of Latin literature, mental discipline, and a know-
ledge of tested and tried class-room methods and tech-
niques, are constantly kept in view.

101-102 ELEMENTARY LATIN — Emphasis laid
upon the mastery of syntax including declensions,
conjugations, vocabulary, and the subjunctive
mood. Derivative relationship of Latin and Eng-
lish given attention.
MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

201-202 INTERMEDIATE LATIN— Selections from
Caesar's Commentaries and Cicero's Orations.
Systematic study of L a t i n grammar and
prose composition supplementary to the transla-
tion.
MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.

303-304 VIRGIL'S AENEID— Equivalent of six books
read. Literary merit of the poem, scansion, and
mythology studied. Prerequisite, Latin 201-202.
MWF 1:15 3 Hrs.

401, 402 SELECTIONS FROM ROMAN HISTOR-
IANS, PRINCIPALLY LIVY— Prerequisite, or
Latin 303-304.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

403 CICERO'S PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS— The
state of Roman philosophical thought studied as a
background for the translation of some of Cicero's
principal essays. Pre-requisite, Latin 303-304.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs.

404 HORACE— Selections from the Satires, Epistles
and Odes. Collateral work in Roman poetry of the
clasical period. Latin prosody developed beyond






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 73

that taken up in Latin 303-304. Pre-requisite, Lat-
in 401-402 or Latin 403.

405 HISTORY OF LITERATURE— A survey of
the entire history of Latin literature. This course
may be taken by the students with or without a
translating knowledge of Latin. Lectures, col-
lateral reading, and reports. Not counted toward
a Latin major.

Time to be arranged 3 Hrs

406— TACITUS AND AUGUSTINE— Translation of
tacitus' Agricola and Germania and Augustine's
Confessions, serving as a basis for the study of
Silver Age Latin and that of early Latin Christian
literature.
Time to be arranged. 3 Hrs.

407— LATIN COMEDY— Translation of at lleast
three comedies of Plautus and Terence, and re-
related matters given attention.
Time to be arranged. 3 Hrs.

408— REVIEW LATIN COMPOSITION— For pros-
pective teachers of Latin. A rapid but thorough
review of Latin grammar and syntax required in
the teaching of high school Latin.
Time to be arranged. 2 Hrs.

DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH

Professor Ogden

101-102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH— Careful atten-
tion is given to pronunciation, correct hearing,
and expression in simple Spanish. Thinking in the
language is begun and a continual growth of a
useable vocabulary sought. The fundamentals of
Spanish grammar, verb construction and oral
and written exercises are given.
MWF 3 Hrs.

201-202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH — Advanced
Spanish composition. Aim : clear, correct expres-
sion in the language; facility in thinking in the



74 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

language; rapid reading to begin acquaintance
with Spanish civilization, and advanced gramlmar.
MWF 3 Hrs.

301, 302 SPANISH LITERATURE— Spanish litera-
ture of the nineteenth century. Oral and written


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