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West Virginia Wesleyan College Catalog: 1934-1935 (Volume 1934-1935) online

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ences. In addition to chemical theory many im-
portant hydro-carbons and their derivatives are
studied.

Prerequisite courses 101 and 102. Laboratory fee

$10.00.

MWF 2:15 4 Hrs. (MWF.— 1:15-5:15

401, 402 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY— Lecture. De-
tailed study of liquids, solids, gases and theory of
solutions. Prerequisite 101-102, 201-202, 203-204.
Fee.
MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.

403, 403r WATER ANALYSIS— Two hours, either
semester. Prerequisite courses 101 to 402.
Fee $4.00.
See Instructor 2 Hrs.

405, 405r GAS ANALYSIS— Two hours, either sem-
mester. Prerequisite courses 101 to 402.
Fee $4.00.
See Instructor 2 Hrs



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 91

407, 407r FOOD ANALYSIS — Three hours, either
semester. Prerequisite courses 101 to 402.
Fee $6.50.
See Instructor 2 Hrs

411, 411r ORGANIC PREPARATIONS— Three hours
either semester. Prerequisite courses 101 to 402.
Fee $10.00
See Instructor 3 Hrs.

414 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY— Laboratory only.
Prerequisite courses 101 to 401 inclusive.
Fee $10.00.
M 1:15-5:15 3 Hrs.






DEPARTMENT OF

GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Professor Haught

101 GENERAL GEOLOGY— This course is a study of
minerals, rocks, and structure of the earth includ-
ing the agencies and processes producing struc-
ture-weathering, erosion, diastrophism, the work
of streams, glaciers, winds, waves, volcanoes.
The theory of the formation of coal, oil, gas, and
other economic products is considered.

MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.

102 GENERAL GEOLOGY — HISTORICAL — The

important objectives of this course are the geo-
logical time divisions, rock formation, and the
correlation with these of their existing life species.
Representative fossils will be examined, and field
trips made.
MWF 7:45 3 Hrs .

107 COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY— The basic idea of this
course is the relation of geography to human in-
stitutions, progress, and well-being. Climate, lat-
itude, relief, winds, streams, plains, rainfall, min-



92 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

erals, barriers, soil, fisheries and other items en-
ter into the study of this relationship.
MWF 8:45 (College Students) 3 Hrs.

MWF 11:45 (Nor. Sch. St'd'ts.) 3 Hrs.

108 COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY — CLIMATOLOGY —

This course is given to a special study of climate.
It is logically developed from a consideration of
the fundamental controls of climate — latitude,
land and water, mountain barriers, altitude, pre-
vailing winds, ocean currents and storms.
MWF 8:45 (College Students) 3 Hrs,

MWF 11:45 (Nor. Sch. St'd'ts.) 3 Hrs.

201-202 ECONOMIC GEOLOGY— Nature and compo-
sition of minerals, origin of mineral deposits, min-
erals as economic resources, exploration and devel-
opment, valuation and taxation, mineral resources,
international aspects of mineral resources, geology
and engineering opportunities.
Lect. and Lab. T.T. 2:15-4:15 — 2 hrs. each
semester.

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
Miss Cronemeyer

Home Economics training is preparation for bet-
ter living. This work is so planned that the girl
is helped to understand her own capacities, to express
her personality, and to develop the right standards
of life. The nutrition value of foods, the selection,
construction, and care of her clothes, budgeting her
allowance, etiquette, and health habits are studied as
ba=dc knowledge for the girl in college as weil as for
the future.

101 CLOTHING SELECTION— Study of the princi-
ples of design applied to dress, the relation of color
to individual problems in dress, and the selection
of materials and clothing according to their suit-
ability and economic value. This course includes
a study of historic costume.
MWF 7:45 3 Hrs.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 93

102 CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION— This course in-
cludes practice in the use of commercial patterns,
hand and machine sewing, applied to simple gar-
ments. Laboratory four hours a week.
Prerequisite Home Economics 101.
TT 7:45 2 Hrs.

201-202 FOODS AND COOKERY— This course is a
study of staple foods including the production,
the preparation of the foods for the table, and the
principles of cookery involved. Practice is given
to develop skill and effciency in handling materials.
Laboratory four hours a week. Parallel or pre-
requisite Chemistry 101, 102.
MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

207-208 INTERIOR DECORATION— Study of the
principles of design and color applied to problems
in home furnishing; the relation of architecture
to and a brief history of furniture.
TT 10:45 2 Hrs.

213 TEXTILES— This course is planned to give tech-
nical knowledge concerning textile materials,
their names, prices, weaves, and uses; including
the study of chemistry of fibers, bleaching, dye-
ing, tests for adulteration of fabrics, microscopic
study of fibers and modern weaves. Prerequisite,
Chemistry 101 and 102. Lecture two hours, labor-
atory two hours per week. Fee $2.00.
Not criven 1934-35.
MWF 3 Hrs.

219 ELEMENTS OF HOME ECONOMICS — For
Standard Normal Students. This course is design-
ed as a non-technical course including study of
foods, clothing and management with reference to
personal, pupil, and school needs.
MWF 3 Hrs.

306 EXPERIMENTAL COOKERY— An exeprimen-

tal study of foods in various combinations with



94 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

special emphasis on effect of ingredients, manip-
ulation, temperature, and other fundamental
principles underlying successful cookery. Prere-
quisite, Foods and Cookery 201-202. Laboratory,
four hours a week. Fee $5.00.
T.T. 2 Hrs.

312 ECONOMICS OF THE HOUSEHOLD— This
course covers a history of the home, a study of
living standards and the business of the home in-
cluding rent, food, clothing, operating expenses,
education, and the servant problem.
Prerequisite-Economics 201.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.

314 MECHANICS OF THE HOUSEHOLD— A sur-
vey of household equipment, its use, cost and care
is made; problems in housekeeping and manage-
ment are solved .
Not given 1934-35.
MWF 3 Hrs.

401, 402 CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION— This course
in an extensive study and use of commerical pat-
terns. Dresses, suits, and blouses will be made of
silk and wool. The designing and draping of a
dress is a part of the second semester's work. Lab-
ortary four hours a week.

Prerequisite Home Economics 101, 102 and 213.
TT 1:15 2 Hrs.

407 DIETETICS— This is a detailed study of human
nutrition including the chemistry of food, diets,
digestion, factors which influence the individual's
need for food, and the best foods. Lecture three
hours and laboratory four hours a week. Fee $4.00
Prerequisite — Home Economics 201 and 202.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

408 MEAL PLANNING AND SERVING— The plan-
ning, purchasing, preparation, and serving of
meals for the family, guests, and community






DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 95

affairs. Table etiquette and decoration are studied.
Lecture one hour and laboratory four hours a
week. Fee $5.00.

Prerequisite home Economics 201 or 202. Not
given 1934-35.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

AND ASTRONOMY

Proffesor Hallam

The course of studies in ,this department has a
three-fold objective: To prepare the student major-
ing in Mathematics for entrance to the leading gra-
duate school; to give the student of Engineering the
necessary foundation; to develop in all students or-
derly and analytic methods of thought.

"The major in Mathematics is required to complete
courses in No. 301 and 302.

101 SOLID GEOMETRY— The usual theorems, con-
structions, a thorough study of solids and surfaces.
Open to all who have had plane geometry.

2 Hrs.

102 COLLEGE GEOMETRY— A sequel to plane geo-
metry. Further study of the line, circle, and trian-
gle. Designed to give the necessary additional
background to prospective teachers of high school
mathematics.

3 Hrs.

103 COLLEGE ALGEBRA — A course in advanced
Algebra including a study of determinants, pro-
fessions, premutations and combinations, proba-
bility, mathematical induction, functions and
graphs, theory of equations, and logarithms.
MWF 8 :45 4 Hrs.

104 TRIGONOMETRY— The study of the angle and
triangle, the functions of an angle, line functions,
trigonometric analysis, logarithms, applications.
MTWTF 8:45 4 Hrs.

201 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY— Application of alge-
bra to geometry. Cadestian coordinates, curve



96 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

tracing, conic sections, transformation of coord-
inates, polar coordinates, the line in space, pura-
dic surfaces.
MWF 1:15 3 Hrs.

202 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS— The idea of
limits, instantaneous rates, differentiation of
algebraic and transcendental functions, differen-
tials, maxima and minima, points of inflections,
indeterminate forms.
MWF 1:15 3 Hrs.

207, 208 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY— The use of
the plane to represent lines, planes and surfaces
in space, and related problems. Prerequisites,
Plane and Solid Geometry.
MWF 2:15 3 Hrs.

209, 210 MECHANICAL DRAWING — Thorough
practice in the use of instruments, lettering, var-
ious theories of projection etc. The course serves
as an introduction to Engineering Drawing and
Architectural Drawing. (May be started either
first or second semester).
MWF 3 Hrs.

213, 214 SURVEYING— Use of instruments, theory
of surveying, computations of distances and are-
as, leveling, plotting. Hours are so arranged that
good weather in autumn and spring are spent do-
ing field work.

Time to be arranged.
MWF 3 Hrs.

220— ASTRONOMY— A descriptive study of the stars
and their motion. Various theories of the origin
of the planetary system are discussed. A small
astronomical telescope is available for the use of
the class.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

301, 302 INTEGRAL CALCULUS — Integration as
the inverse of differentiation, technique of integr-
ation, integration as a process of summation,



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 97

multiple integrals, convergence, and diver-
gence of infinite series, elementary differential

equations.

3 Hrs.

304 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS— A study of simple
and compound interest, discount, depreciation of
assets, bonds, annuities and life insurance. Many
practical problems of business are discussed.
TT 11:15 2 Hrs.

401, 402 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS— Ordinary
and partial differential equations, applications,
systems, integration by series.

3 Hrs.

407-408 PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY — Projective
geometric forms and their relationships, and the
projective generation and properties of conies.
MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

PHYSICS

Professor H aught

College Physics is a cultural course for arts and
science students with a predilection for work in this
field. Students having medicine or engineering as their
objective take the course to meet the requirements
for entrance to medical college or for advanced stand-
ing in an engineering course. Prospective high-school
teachers, qualifying in the field of physical science,
take it and physical chemistry to meet the state's re-
quirement. Freshman mathematics is a prerequisite
and students expecting to take the course are advised
to enroll for it in their sophomore year after complet-
ing algebra and trigonometry as freshmen. The course
outline for the first and the second semesters is given
below.

201 COLLEGE PHYSICS— Mechanics, measurement,
matter and force moments and equilibrium, vec-
tors, fluid pressure, Newton's laws of motion,
kinetics of fluid, work and energy, rotary motion,



98 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

harmonic motion. Heat-Thermometry, work
and energy, change of state, heat engines, trans-
ference of heat.

MWF Lesture 10:15 5 Hrs.

Lab. 10:15-12:15

202 COLLEGE PHYSICS— Magnetism. Theory of
terrestrial magnetism. Electricity. Static electric-
ity, current electricity, chemical and magnetic ef-
fects of electricity, dynamos and motors, applica-
tions of electricity, Sound. Mature and transmis-
sion of properties of musical sounds. Light. Na-
ture and propagation of image formation, color
phenomena, interference, diffraction, the spec-
trum, polarization, electric discharges through
gases, electrical radiations, radioactivity.
MWF Lecture 10:15

TT Lab. 10:15-12:15 5 Hrs.



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Mr. Simons, Miss Nason, and Coach Ross

This department seeks to provide equipment and
a program that gives the individual and groups an
opportunity for physical activity in situations that are
"physically wholesome, mentally stimulating and sat-
isfying, and socially sound." The program is so ar-
ranged that adequate exercise for hygienic reasons, an
education in physical activity, and a ''carry over"
interest in athletic games, may be secured.

For those who wish to prepare for teaching in this
field a major and minor in Physical Education in ac-
cordance with the requirement of West Virginia is
offered. Valuable experience, also may be had
through the well organized intercollegiate athletics
of football, basketball, track, and tennis.

The department promotes a full founded pro-
gram of intrrmural sports consisting of speedball, bas-
ketball, baseball, track, tennis, swimming, handball
and golf.

The equipment facilities consist of a full equipped



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 99

gymnasium, handball court, swimming pool, one-fifth
mile cinder track, football field, four tennis courts
and a golf course.

101-102 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(MEN) — Elementary course in marching, cal-
esthenics, apparatus, games and swimming.
One hour each semester-two periods a week.
Required of all Freshman.

T.T. 1 Hr.

103 HYGIENE (MEN) — General course in Hygiene
offered for all freshmen and new students.

2 Hrs.

104 HISTORY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION— Stud>
of development of physical education as a part of
the educational program.

2 Hrs.

One hour of credit is allowed each semester for
the following sports :

109 Football.

110 Basketball.

112 Track and Field.
114 Baseball.
116 Tennis.

121-122 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(WOMEN) — Elementary course in marching,
calisthenics, stunts, folk dancing, games, indoor
sports.

One hour each semester — two periods a week.
Required of all Freshmen.
T.T. 1 Hr.

123 HYGIENE (WOMEN)— General course in Hy-
giene required of all freshman women.

2 Hrs.

126 HEALTH TEACHING— Materials and methods
for teaching Health in elementary schools and
high schools. Designed for Standard Normal



100 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

School student and students specializing in Phy-
sical Education.
TT 3:15 2 Hrs.

201-202 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(MEN) — Advanced course in gymnasium prac-
tice following courses 101 and 102.
Required of all Sophomores.
T.T. 1 Hr.

205-206 RHYTHMS (WOMEN) — National, ,i:<P\ral
dancing, clogging, folk, and athletic dancing.

2 Hrs
One hour of credit is allowed each semester for
the following sports.

209 Varsity Football.

210 Varsity Basketball.

212 Varsity Track and Field.
214 Varsity Baseball.
216 Varsity Tennis.

221-222 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(WOMEN) ^Continuation of 121 and 122.
T.T. 1 Hr.

301-302 ADVANCED PRACTICE (MEN)— Boxing
wrestling, fencing, swimming, life saving, tumbl-
ing apparatus, etc.

2 Hrs

303 STUNTS, CONTESTS, GAMES (WOMEN)
One lecture period and two practice periods each
week.

2 Hrs

304 INTRA-MURALS, ATHLETICS, ETC., — Play-
ground baseball, tennis, golf, handball, intra-
murals, etc.

2 Hrs

305 PHYSICAL EDUCATION — Materials and
Methods for teaching physical education.

2 Hrs.

306 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

— Study of methods in physical education pro-



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 101

grams, athletic programs, contests, etc.

2 Hrs

309 Varsity Footboll.

310 Varsity Basketball.
312 Varsity Track and Field.
314 Varsity Basketball.

316 Varsity Tennis.

401 KINESIOLOGY— Study of the science of mus-
cular movement and mechanics. Prerequisite:
Anatomy and Physiology.

3 Hrs

402 MEDICAL GYMNASTICS— Theory and practice
of corrective physical education. Prerequisite:
Kinesiology, Anatomy and Physiology.

3 Hrs

403 DIAGNOSIS AND ANTHROPOMETRY— Phy-
sical examinations, measurements and diagnosis.

2 Hrs

404 ATHLETIC TRAINING AND OFFICIATING
— Conditioning, care and prevention, football,
basketball, etc., officiating.

2 Hrs
404 CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT— Gym-
nasium and field construction, selection and care
of athletic equipment.

1 Hrs.

406 FIRST AID— American Red Cross Methods lead-
ing to a certificate.

1 Hrs.

407-408 ATHLETIC COACHING— Fundamentals of
football, basketball, baseball, track and tennis.

2 Hrs
One hour of credit is allowed each semester for
the following sports.

409 Varsity Football.

410 Varsity Basketball.

412 Varsity Track and Field.
414 Varsity Baseball.
416 Varsity Tennis.



102 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

V — Division of Political and
Social Sciences

Professors Glauner, Karickhoff,
and Lambert

Thisj?roup of studies proposes to present a sur-
vey of the history, economic conditions and society of
the human race. The courses in Economics take up
the chief principles of the subject. Then attention
is turned to labor, money, commerce and the history
of their development. The collection and organiza-
tion of data are considered important.

The purpose of the courses in History is to ac-
quaint the student with the movements, organizations
and the general activity of mankind from the earliest
times up to the present. The study of Political
Science correlates with that of History. Here we
trace the political organizations of peoples and ac-
quaint the student with the various forms, changes
and characteristics of organized government.

Sociology emphasizes a study of the human race
from a cultural standpoint and its social well-being.
In this study also the evils resultant from crime,
disease and maladjustment are presented to the stu-
dent.

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
AND SOCIOLOGY

Professor Karickhoff

101-102 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS— This course
is designed to give the student a knowledge of the
subject matter of Economics. Special considera-
tion will be given to all principles of production,
distribution, consumption, international trade,
tariff, transportation, etc. Lectures and prescribed
reading. Credit not given for one semester.
MWF 8:45 3 Hrs



DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 103

201 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES
— A study of the various conservation policies.
Special attention will be given to the wastefulness
of natural resources in West Virginia. Lectures,
collateral reading, reports. Prerequisite, Eco-
nomics 101-102.

TT 7:45 2 Hrs.

202 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED

STATES — A study of the economic forces in the
United States. The industrial, commercial and
financial development will have due consideration.
Lectures and collateral reading.
TT 7:45 2 Hrs.

304 MONEY AND BANKING— The first half of the
semester is devoted to a study of the evolution of
money and the problems of money economy The
second half of the semester is given to a study of
the history of the banking systems of the world
with special reference to the banking systems of
the United States . The Federal Reserve Act of
1913 is considered. Lectures, collateral reading.
Prerequisite, Economics 101-102.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

401 LABOR PROBLEMS— This will be a study of the
labor movements in the United States. Since
the Industrial Revolution, the problems and at-
tempted solutions. Text books, lectures, reports.
Prerequisite, Economics 101-102.

TT 11:15 2 Hrs.

402 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT— This
course deals with origin and development of econ-
omic theories. Lectures and collateral reading.
Prerequisite, Economics 101-102.

TT 2 Hrs.

306 FINANCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED

STATES— This course will survey the field of
Federal finance revenue, expenditure, and debt
from the Colonial period to the present time.



104 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Special consideration will be given to taxation,
tariff, money and banking. Textbooks, lectures
and prescribed reading.
TT 8:45 (Not given 1934-35) 2 Hrs.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND
POLITICAL SCIENCE

Professor Glauner and Dean Lambert

The Department has the following purposes in
view, first, a cultural objective which is necessary
for intelligent ctizenship. A broad survey of the field
of History is offered, stressing the culture and insti-
tutions of the people of Europe and America; sec-
ond, a training for persons preparing to teach in the
elementary and secondary schools; third, students
who are preparing to study should take some drill in
History and Government. This is quite important in
forming the foundation for the practice of their pro-
fession; fourth, for those Who are interested in be-
coming engaged in governmental activities.

101-102 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES— An
introduction of the history of the United States,
with emphasis on the political, social and con-
stitutional development. Some study is made of
the leading statesmen.
MWF 7 :45 and 8 :45 3 Hrs.

201 ANCIENT HISTORY— A rapid survey of the
history of civilization to the decline of Rome.
TT 8:45 2 Hrs.

202 MEDIEVAL HISTORY— Emphasis will be placed
on the social and political institutions of the Mid-
dle Ages.

TT 8:45 2 Hrs.

207-208 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY— An in-
troductory course in the history of Europe since
1500. This course is designed to form a back-






DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 105

ground for the study of contemporary problems.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

301-302 HISTORY OF ENGLAND— A survey of the
History of England from the earliest times to
the present. This course is recommended for
English majors and pre-law students.
TT 7:45 2 Hrs.

307 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1789— A detailed
study of the discovery, settlement and develop-
ment of American to 1789.
TT 10:15 2 Hrs.

312 EUROPE SINCE 1914— A detailed discussion of
the problems since the World Word.

TT 10:15 2. Hrs.

313 HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA— This course
takes up a detailed study of the early settlement,
the growth, and the industrial development of West
Virginia. Some attention is devoted to the geo-
graphical and climatic importance of the Trans-
Allegheny region and its influences on national
affairs.

MWF 8:45 3 Hrs.

401 CHURCH HISTORY— A rapid survey of the de-
velopment of the Christian Church.
Not offered 1934-35 3 Hrs.

406 RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED
STATES — A detailed study of the social and poli-
tical development of the United States since 1876.
Not offered 1934-35 3 Hrs.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Dean Lambert

201, 202 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT— This course
is designed for freshmen and sophomores. During
the first semester a study is made of the historical
origin of the Constitution which included the trac-
ing of the original influences that were conducive
to colonial unity and the succession of events that



106 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

led to the formation and the adoption of the Con-
stitution and its early development. The second
semester is devoted to a study of the powers and
functions of the main divisions of government and
considerable stress is paid to state and local powers
and regulations.
MWF 11:15 3 Hrs.

301 GOVERNMENTS OF EUROPE— A comparative
study of the historical origin, constitutional basis
and development of the governments of England,
France. Germany, and other important European
States. Primarily for juniors and seniors.
MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

302 POLITICAL P A R T I E S — The development
of the party system in the United States is traced
with a great deal of emphasis being placed on
political principles and party leaders. Partisan
influence in executive and legislative functions in
national affairs, is given considerable attention.
The organization, financing, and administration
of the great political parties are dealt with in some
detail.

MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

401, 402 AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS— A

study of the relations between the United States
and foreign nations. Diplomatic questions and
leading personalities in our foreign affairs are
given particular attention.
TT 10:15 2 Hrs.

SOCIOLOGY
Professor Karickhoff

201-202 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY— This course
will acquaint the student with the scope, method
and purpose of sociological study and will endeavor
to interest him in the study of men in his relation
to other men. In the first semester the course will



1 DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION 107

deal with principles and theory, and in the second
semester with problems, leectures and prescribed
readings. Credit not given for one semester.
MWF 10:15 3 Hrs.

207 RURAL AND URBAN SOCIOLOGY— A study of
rural and urban problems and institutions. The


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