Western Historical Co.

History of Walworth County, Wisconsin, containing an account of its settlement, growth, development and resources...its war record, biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and early settlers; the whole preceded by a history of Wisconsin...and an abstract of its laws and constitution.. online

. (page 1 of 165)
Online LibraryWestern Historical CoHistory of Walworth County, Wisconsin, containing an account of its settlement, growth, development and resources...its war record, biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and early settlers; the whole preceded by a history of Wisconsin...and an abstract of its laws and constitution.. → online text (page 1 of 165)
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Walworth County,



WISCONSIN,



CONTAINING



AN ACCOUNT OF ITS SETTLEMENT, GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT AND RESOURCES; AN EXTENSIVE ANI>
MINUTE SKETCH OF ITS CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES— THEIR IMPROVEMENTS, INDUSTRIES,
MANUFACTORIES, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND SOCIETIES; ITS WAR RECORD, BIOGRAPH-
ICAL SKETCHES, PORTRAITS OF PROMINENT MEN AND EARLY SETTLERS;
THE WHOLE PRECEDED BY A HISTORY OF WISCONSIN, STATISTICS
OF THE STATE, AND AN ABSTRACT OF ITS LAWS AND CON-
STITUTION AND OF THE CONSTITUTION
OF THE UNITED STATES.



IXjXjXJSTlEaj^TIE TD.



CHICAGO:
WESTERN HISTORICAL COMPANY.



MDCCCLXXXn.



PKEFACE.



THE writing of contemporaneous history is not easy. It can be but little more than a
truthful chronicle of the times, as the color of local prejudice is too strong to become a
part or parcel of the work. It has been the endeavor of the writers having the work in charge,
to gather the historical facts, and put them in form for preservation, rather than to tell an inter-
esting story with rhetorical display. So the work, if it has any value in the estimation of
those for whom it was written, will find appreciation in the mass of matter pertaining to the
early settlement of Walworth County, which it has rescued from oblivion, and preserved for
future generations.

It has been the desire of the writers to incorporate all that could have any bearing on the
growth and development of a prosperous and thrifty agricultural community, under the most
favored conditions of the most advanced civilization the world has ever known. In this work
the task has been more that of compilation than the gathering of facts. The people have co-op-
erated in the work with a cordiality never before experienced by the editors in a wide and
extended experience, and it is only to avoid invidious mention that they refrain from thanking
personally the many friends who have without exception assisted them during the writing of the
work. It is suflBcient to say that during the period the work was in process of compilation, not
a single instance occurred when information was asked or assistance desired, that it was not
given cheerfully and without stint.

In the preparation of the work, the historians have availed themselves of all the printed
matter which had been heretofore published of a historical character — Simmon's History of
Geneva; Dwinnell's Reminiscences; Beardsley's Newspaper Sketches, etc. — from which all
has been culled necessary to complete the work, and for which invaluable aid acknowledg-
ment is here given. In addition, the manuscript matter collected by the Old Settlers' Society
has been fully collated, together with all that could be gathered from a careful search through
all the county records, or gleaned from the memories of the early settlers still living.

To make sure that our history is full and complete, we read our manuscript to several of
the most prominent ofiicials of the Old Settlers' Society, and secured their written approval.
The town histories were also read and approved by the best-informed resident we could find who
took interest in the matter, and when put in type the proofs were all sent to several different
persons for correction.

The biographies were all copied on a type writing machine and sent by mail to each person
for revision. If omissions or errors are found, all we can say, is, we did all we could to
prevent them.

It will be a matter of serious regret should the work resulting from the valuable material
and aid furnished prove unsatisfactory to the many friends of the enterprise who will ever be
remembered with heart-felt kindness by the

Publishers.



CONTENTS.



HISTORY OF WISCONSIIV.



Antiquitiea 19

Indian Tribea !!.....*.."....' 21

Pre-Territorial Annals ™."....',..." 29

Wisconsin Territory "..'."'.['. 41

Wisconsin as a State !!."..".'".*."!.*." 52

First Administration ",' 52

Second Administration 57

Third AdminiBtration ,,"" 59

Foarth Administration 62

Fifth Administration [.* (54

Sixth Administration ] 66

SeTenth Administration ".'.".* 67 I

War of Secession Commenced '. 69

Eighth Administration .'.". 76

Ninth Administration W,','..'. 85

Statistics of Volunteers ."" 90

Tenth Administration ".""" 92

Eleventh Administration ""'..'.*.".." 93

Twelfth Administration ."'."'." 94

Thirteenth Administration 97

Fourteenth Administration .""'."! 99

Fifteenth Administration '....V"l04

Sixteenth Administration 109

Topography and Geology !!!!.'.'."!![!!llO

The Archfean Age .*.'.!.'" "n2

Paleozoic Time— Silurian Age""*"..'.'„'.'ll5

Devonian Age Iju

Glacial Period !!!','.*,*.!!" I20

Climatology I2i

Trees, Shrubs and Vines..,."." loa

Fauna ■" 23^

Fish and Fish Culture"."'.*.!!.'"".".'." 134

Large Animals— Time of their "Di'sap^

pearanco igg

Peculiarities of the Bird Fauna I39

Educational '"Hft

Original School Code..!.'..'.*..!!!!!!!!!!!!!"*'i4o

Agitation for Free Schools ! 141

School System under State &)Vera!

ment J4j

School Fund Income '.".'.'.' 142

State University j43

Agricultural College !!!!!! 144

Normal Schools J44

Teachers' Institutes !!!!!!!!!!!!!'l46

Graded Schools !!.'.'.'.""l46



Page.



Educational :

Township System 146

Free High Schools *.'.!!"l47

School Offices !!.'.'!! 147

State Teachers' Certificate8!!*.!!!!!!!!!!!'.!!!u7

Teachers' Associations 143 1

Libraries !!!!!!! 148 '

State Superintendents !!!.!! Kg :

College Sketches !.']49

Female Colleges !!!!!!!l50



Commorce and Manufactures :

Dairy Products 203

Pork and Beef. !!!!!!203

Hops „ !!!!!!!!!!!204

Tobacco— Cranberries !!!! 205

Ji>.1"0" 206

Miscellaneous 2O6

Water Powers !!!*..!! !!!!.'!.".'.*.'!206

Manufactures 208



Commercial Schools 151

Agriculture .'.*.'."."!"'l51

Mineral Resources .'.'.'.'.*.*.'l62

Lead and Zinc 1^2

J,"" ;.'.;;::;:;:i66

Copper jgg

G-Jld and Silver jjg

Brick Clays igg

Cement Eock ,"_"_[ j7q

Limestone— Glass Sand ....'."...'..' 171

Peat— Building Stones ..' 172

RHilroads "173

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul...!..'!.... 173

Chicago* Northwestern ne

Wisconsin Central !!!l78

Western Union !!!!!!!l79 '

West Wisconsin !!!!!!!!!! 180 '

Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western!!! 180

Green Ba.v 4 Minnesota isi

Wisconsin Valle.v '18I

Sheboygan 4 Fond du Lac..!...!!!!!'.!'.!!!!i81 I

Mineral Point !*182 '

Madison & Portage !!!!!!!!!!!!!.'!!!!l82

North Wisconsin !!!!!!!!!!!!!'l83

Prairie du Chien & McGregor.!!!!! !!!.! 183

Chippewa Falls & Western "'igs

Narrow Gauge ig3

Conclusion ."!!!."!!!!!!. 184

Lumber [" ige

Banking !!....!!!.!!!!!!......!.i9i

Commerce and Manufactures '."'. igg

Furs ^. !!!!!."!l99

Lead and Zinc — Iron "200

J'"'? tier !.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!2oi



Health 210

Geographical Position ."!!!!!!!!!!23D

Physical Features 230

Geology !!!!!!!!!!!!!23i

?,'?'''?8,<" 232

Climatology 232

Rain Character ""V.'.V.V.'.'."."233

Isotherms [\ 234

Barometrical .....!!.! 234



W'inds..



2.1,5



Grain .



..202



Olimatological Changes from Settiinii

■ in the State 235

Influence of Nationalities !!!!!!!!!237

Occupations— rood—Education,etc..'.!!!238

History of Disease 238

Ratio of Sickness, Ft. Howard and wiiil

nebago 239

Education of the Blind ..!.!....!.! 241

Institute of Deaf and Dumb !!!!.!!!241

Industrial School for Boys !!!242

State Prison !!!!!!!242

State Hospital for the Insane !.!....!!242

Northern Hospital for the Insane 243

City of Milwaukee 243

Health Resorts !!!!!!..!!!!244

Change of Diseases. !!246

Pulmonary Diseases .....!!!!!!!! 248

Statistics J "' 249

Population, 1875, of Townships, Alpha-

betically Arranged by Counties 249

Population by Counties -^g

Nativity by Counties ...!!269

Valuation of Property !!260

Acreage of Principal Crops ...261! 262



ABSTRACT OF WISC'OXSIIV STATE tAWS.



Page,

283

283

284



Actions

Arrest !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Attachment .'.'.'."."!

Adoption of Children .......,.!

Assignment of Mortgage ...'. 974

Assessment and Collection of Taxes '>G7

Assessment of Taxes 268

Bills of Exchange or Promis8oVVNotOT!!!!"27''
Borrowed Money.... 2f;7

Capital Punishment !! 070

Collection of Taxes 070

Commercial Terms 00,

Common Schools qcc 1 r "j- .■ . ;;

Damages for Tre9pass......'!!::!!:!!!!:!!!!!!!!!!!;|?9 ' :jurora'



Elections and General Election

Estrays

Exemptions *.*.*.'.,*.

Fences .'.'.'.""*

Forms of Conveyances

Forms of Mortgages !!!!!

Garnishment !

Highways and Bridges!!!!!!.!!!!!

Hours of Labor

Interest !!!'.',!!!!'

Intoxicating Liquors .'.'.*."!

Judgments..



Paqe.

263

279

284

280

273

274

284

270

273

277

271

284

277

278



Landlord and Tenant 281

Limitation 01 Actions !!! 98.5

Marks and Brands ......!!!! 281

Married Women !!....!.!".'..!! 283

Stay Law !!.!!!!!!!!!!!! 234

Surveyors and Surveys ! 282

Support of Poor .". ."!!!.' 2g2

Suggestions to Persons PurchasingBooks

by Subscription 285

Title of Real Property by De8cent.!!.'.'.'."!!!!!!275
Weights and Measures 970

Wills i'l

Wolf Scalps !!!!!!.'.'."'.'.'!!!!!!!!!!!278



PAnp I MISCELLANEOUS,

Wisconsin State ConstituHon 9»7 v„.. r m-

V. S. Constitution ?'! Vote of Wisconsin for

dent



. Constitution ............!!!!!!!!.297



Paoe. 1
Governor and Presi-
306-307



Population of the Slate..



Paok.

308



CONTENTS.



HISTORY OF W AJLWORTH COUXTY.



CHAPTER I. PAGE.

Topographical 309

The Indians 310

Tb.' Indian VilUge 312

Firat Settlement of White Men 314

Formation of the County 315

The Roads of 1S3(1 315

Tlie Fir«t Road Made by White Men.. 315

The First White S«ttlera 316

The Early Neighhorhoode 317

War at Geneva 321

First Town Organizations 324

Further Sulidivisious 324

Early Survejs 327

CHAPTER II.

Incidents and Reminiscences — 1836 to

1842 329

First Thoroughftres 329

First Voyagers 330

Early Mail Facilities 331

Their Houses 332

Annoyauceu 333

HardehipB 336

First Conflagration 337

Claim Associations 337

Legal Lore 340

The First Judge 345

The First Influx of Swine 346



PAGE,

Recreation 346

The Pie Stories 348

Moral and Religious Germs 349

Moral Agitation 351

Walworth County Branch Under-
ground Railroad 353

The Beginning of Husbandry 354

CHAPTER III.— War Histoey.

Wahvorih County Militia 356

Sixth Regiment Wisconsin Militia 356

The Grand Muster 358

A Court Martial 360

Moral Indignation 360

The War ol the Rebellion 3G3

Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry 364

Tenth Wisconsin Infantry 369

Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry 372

Twenty-second Wisconsin Infantry.... 378
Twenty-eighth Wisconsin Infantry.... 383

Fortieth Wisconsin Infantry 389

Forty-ninth Wisconsin Infantry 390

Koster of Officersof Walworth County 391
Troops and Money Furnished 394

CHAPTER IV.— Walwohth County Ag-
ricultural Society.

Early Organizations 399

FirstCounty Fair 400



PAGE.

Fair Gronnds 401

Officers 402

Constitution 406

One of the Early Fairs 408

A Contrast 409

Agencies of Success 414

CHAPTER v.— Old Settlehs' Society.

Organization 418

Annual Reunions 419 to 429

Roster of Otficens 429

Roster of Members 432

CHAPTER VI.

Railroads and Telegraphs 439

Corporate History 444

Early Fiscal Affairs 445

Early Schools and School Districts 446

County Property 447

Support of Paupers 448

Roster of County Ofiicere, 1830 to 1881 450

Legislators 457

Constitutional Conventions 468

State Government 458

Courts and Officers 460

Walworth County Bar 461

Statistics 463

Pressor County 468

Conclusion 471



Elkhorn. page.

Organization 472

Location and Natural Features 472

Early Settlement 472

The Village 477

Park and Buildings 478

The Jails 480

Early Taverns 481

First Things 4S2

The War Period 483

The Lai^est Fire 483

Corporation 484

First Town Meeting 484

Schools 486

Elkhorn in 1881 489

Business Firms 489

Banks 490

Churches 491

Societies 493

Newspapers 493

Biographical Sketches 497

Town of East Tkoy.

Organization 525

Natural Features 525

Early Settlement 526

Settlers of 1837 526

Settlers of 1838 527

Early Times and Events 528

Early Trials and Early Progress 530

The First Town Meeting 531

Separation of the Towns 532

Village of East Troy 534

Churches 635

First Sunday school 537

The Press 538

Societies 638

Hotels 539

Bands 539

Insurance 539

Fire 640

Telegraph and Telephone Line e-lO

Oak Ri ige Cemetery 540

Biographical Sketches 543

Town of Troy.

Organization 552

Natural Features 552

Early Settlers 563

The Porter Settlement 556

Early Festivities 657

Growth and Development 568

Separation of the Towns 561

Town Meetings and Roster 5r;2

Troy Center 663

Mayhew Station 564

Churches 564

War Record 565



HISTORY OF TOWNS.

PAGE.

Troy in 1881 6C5

Biographical Sketches 665

Town of Whitewater.

Natural Features 571

Agriculture 571

Population 572

Town Organization 572

Schools 574

Early Setilement.. 576

Whitewater's Early Settlement 680

A Reminiscence 583

Untimely Sui<ide 585

Murder of William Hamilton 585

A Pioneer Festival 586

Charter Elections 588

The Village Roster 690

Whitewater During the War 591

Women's Relief Work 597

Growth of Whitewater 598

Whitewater As It Is 598

Village Organization 599

Scho dfl 599

State Normal Schools 599

The Post Office 601

The Press 601

Churches 602

Societies 606

Business Topics .' 607

Banks 610

Hotels 611

Professional Directory 611

Business Directory 611

Railroad Communication 611

Biographical Sketches 612

Town of Dei.avan.

Organization 657

Topography 657

Early Settlement 657

First Things 660

Official History 661

Delavan Village 664

Village Directory 655

Corporate Village History 6B6

Poet Office 670

Manufactoriea 671

Societies 672

Banks 674

Hotels 675

Wisconsin Dental College 675

Deaf and Dumb Asylum 676

Churches 679

Schools 681

Newspapers 682

The Delavan Guards 682

Muster Roll 683



• PAGE.

Circuses and Shows 683

The War Record 684

Biographidal Sketches ^ 687

Town of Darien.

Organization 732

Topography 732

Early Settlement 732

First Things and Eventfl 734

Corporate History 735

Village of Darien 738

Religious 741

Post Office 741

Town Hall 742

Societies 742

War History 742

Cheese Factories 742

Schools 743

Biographical Sketches 743

Town of Sharon.

Organization 754

Natural Features 754

Pioneer History 754

Official 766

Village ol Sharon 758

Post Office 759

The Press 769

Societies 760

Churches 760

Hotels 761

Banks 761

Cheese Factory 761

Steam Flouring Mill 762

Allen's Grove 762

Biographical Sketches 764

Town of Richmond.

Organization 776

Situation and Natural Feature.s 775

The First Settler 775

Other Early Settlers 776

Churches 777

Official 777

Biographical Sketches 780

Town of Walworth.

Early Settlement of Big Foot Prairie.. 792

First Things 794

War Record 794

Corporate History 796

Roster of Town Officers 796

Biographical Sketches 797

Town of Lyons.

Organization 808

Official 808

Water-Powers 810

Early Settlement 811

Village of Lyons.. 813



CONTENTS.



vn



mSTORT OF TOWNN— Continued.



PAGE.

Springfield 815

War History 815

Biograpbical Sketches 816

Town of La Grange.

Natural Features 821

Organization and Early Settlement.... 821

Churches 824

Roster of Town Officers 824

War History 825

Biographical Sketches 826

Town of Bloomfield.

Organization and Topography 835

First Settlers 835

Early Events 839

Genoa Junction 839

Churches 840

Town Roster 841

Biographical Sketches 845

Towjj OF Geneva.

Early Settlement 852

Early Pioneers (deceased) 853

First Things 865

Early Taverns 866

Corporate Town History 868

Geneva Lake 872

War Record 873

Schools 874

Newspapers 874

Bank of Geneva 875

Churches 876

Lake Geneva Seminary 879



PA.'E.

Hotels 881

Kayes Park 882

Pishcotaqua Park House 883

Parka and Camps 884

Marengo Park House 884

Camp Coolie 885

The Cisco 885

Societies 886

Directory for 1882 886

Fish Culture 889a

Geneva Lake 890h

The Water Powtr 894e

Railroads 895f

The John Haekins ManufacturiDgOo..895f

Geneva Lake Mills 895f

Corporate History 896g

Biographical Sketches 898i

Town or Spring Prairie.

Organization 889

Topography '. 889

Spring Prairie in 1836 890

A Reminiscence 891

The Indians 892

Settlers of 1837 893

Settlers of 1838 893

Early Times and Events 896

Official History 899

The Mormon Church 902

Churches 904

Cemeteries 905

Pioneers 905



PAGE.

War History 911

Biographical Sketches 912

Town of La Fatette.

Organization 921

• Natural Features 921

First Settlers 921

Recollections of 1836-37 922

War History 925

Town Roster 925

Churches, Schools, etc 927

Biographical Sketches 928

Town of Sugar Creek.

Organization 937

Topography 937

The Settlement 938

Corporate History 942

The First Town Meeting 942

Roster of Town Officers 942

War Historj- 944

Churches, Schools, etc 944

Biographical Sketches 945

Towx OF Linn.

Organization 950

Natural Features 950

Early Settlers 950

Early History 952

A Reminiscence 953

First Town Meetings 955

Roster of Town Officers 955

War Record 957

Biographical Sketches 958



page.

Aram, J»lne8 685

Church, Cyrus 805

Cravath, Prosper 595

Collie, Rev. Joseph 415

Douglas, C 397

Halterman, D. E 703

Harrington, N. M 631

Hollinshead, William 541



PORTRAITS.

PAGE.

James, Thomas Perry 788

Locke, Daniel 887

McDougald. William 821

Mahie, Jeremiah 343

Marsh, Sanger 577

Phoenix. Samuel F 325

Potter, John F 559

Rockwell, Le Grand 451



PAGE.

Simmons, James 869

Spooner, Wyman 361

Salisbury, Daniel 469

Topping, Rev. Henry 433

Teeple, Charles S 739'

Wyiie, George W 379

Williams. R. J 853



PAGE.

Court House front.

State Normal School 613

Institute for Deaf and Dumb 667

Views on Dtlavan Lake 721

Lake Geneva Seminary 880

Whiting House 881



1 LLrS TR ATIONS.

PAGE.

A. B. Church's Residence 882

Piehcatnqua House 883

Summer Residence of D. L.Hamlin 884

Summer Residence of Maj. Anson Sperry 885
Summer Rebidirnce of Julien S. Rumeey.. 889a
Summer Residence of Ed. Ayers 890b



PAGE.

Summer Residence of L. Z. Leiter S92o

Summer Re&idence of N. K.Fairbank 892c

Summer Residence of Shelton Sturges S93d

Summer Residence of G. L. Dunlap S93d

Summer Residence of M. E. Burton 896g



Map of Walworth County.





HHAPS,




PAOIS.




PAGE.


307


Map of Delavan Lake


721



Map of Geneva Lake..



PAGE.

... 891




HISTORY OF WISCONSIN.

BY C. W. BUTTERFIELD.



I— WISCONSIN ANTIQUITIES.

The first explorers of the valleys of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi and its tributaries,
seem not to have noticed, to any considerable e.xtent, the existence within these vast areas of
monuments of an extinct race. Gradually, however, as the tide of emigration broke through the
barriers of the Alleghanies and spread in a widely extended flow over what are now the States of
the Northwest, these prehistoric vestiges attracted more and more the attention of the curious
and the learned, until, at the present time, almost every person is presumed to have some general
knowledge, not only of their existence, but of some of their striking peculiarities. Unfortunately,
these signs of a long since departed people are fast disappearing by the never ceasing operations
of the elements, and the constant encroachments of civilization. The earliest notices of the
animal and vegetable kingdom of this region are to be found in its rocks ; but Wisconsin's earli-
est records of men can only be traced in here and there a crumbling earth-work, in the fragment
of a skeleton, or in a few stone and copper implements — dim and shadowy relics of their
handicraft.

The ancient dwellers in these valleys, whose history is lost in the lapse of ages, are desig-
nated, usually, as the Mound-Builders ; not that building mounds was probably their distinctive
employment, but that such artificial elevations of the earth are, to a great extent, the only evi-
dences remaining of their actual occupation of the country. As to the origin of these people,
all knowledge must, possibly, continue to rest upon conjecture alone. Nor were the habitations
of this race confined to the territory of which Wisconsin now forms a part. At one time, they
must have been located in many ulterior regions. The earth-works, tumuli, or " mounds," as they
are generally designated, are usually symmetrically raised and often inclosed in mathematical
figures, such as the square, the octagon, and the circle, with long lines of circumvallation.
Besides these earth-works, there are pits dug in the solid rock; rubbish heaps formed in the
prosecution of mining operations ; and a variety of implements and utensils, wrought in copper
or stone, or moulded in clay. Whence came the inhabitants who left these evidences to succeed-
ing generations .'' In other words, who were the Mound-Builders .' Did they migrate from the
Old World, or is their origin to be sought for elsewhere.'' And as to their manners and customs
and civilization — what of these things.' Was the race finally swept from the New World to give
place to Red men, or was it the one from which the latter descended .' These momentous ques-
tions are left for the ethnologist, the archaeologist, and the antiquarian of the future to answer —
if they can.



20 HISTORY OF ^VISCONSIX.

Inclosures cind mounds of the prehistoric people, it is generally believed, constituted but
parts of one system; the former being, in the main, intended for purposes of defense or religion;
the latter, for sacrifice, for temple sites, for burial places, or for observatories. In selecting sites
for many of these earth-works, the' Mound-Builders appear to have been influenced by motives
which prompt civilized men to choose localities for their great marts; hence, Cincinnati, St.
Louis, Chicago, Milwaukee and other cities of the West are founded on ruins of pre-existing
structures. River terraces and river bottoms seem to have been the favorite' places for these
earth-works. In such localities, the natural advantages of the country could be made available
with much less trouble than in portions of the country lying at a distance from water-courses.
In Wisconsin, therefore, as in other parts, the same general idea of selecting points contiguous
to the principal natural thoroughfares is found to have prevailed with' the Mound-Builders ; for
their works are seen in the basin of the Fox river of the Illinois, in that of Rock river and its
branches, in the valley of Fox river of Green bay, in that of the Wisconsin, as well as near
the waters of the Mississippi.

While a few circumvallations and immense mounds, such as are common to certain other
portions of the United States, are discoverable in Wisconsin, yet by fa- the largest number of
earthworks have one peculiarity not observable, except in a few instances, outside the State.
This characteristic is a very striking one The fact is revealed that th,:y are imitative in form —
resembling beasts, reptiles, birds, fish, man. All these, for convenience, are usually classed
under the general name of "animal mounds," although some are in the similitude of trees, some
of war clubs, others of tobacco pipes. Generally, these figures are in groups, though sometimes
they are seen alone. For what purpose these earth-works were heaped up — they rise above the
surface two, four, and sometimes six feet — or what particular uses they were intended to subserve,
is unknown. It is, however, safe to affirm tbat they had some significance. A number resemble-
the bear; a few, the buffalo; others, the raccoon. Lizards, turtles, and even tadpoles, are out-
lined in the forms of some. The war eagle, and the war club has each its representative. All
this, of course, could not have been a mere happening — the work of chance. The sizes of these
mounds are as various as their forms. One near Cassville, in Grant county, very complete in
its representation of an animal, supposed to be of the elephant species, was found, upon measure-
ment, to have a total length of one hundred and thirty-five feet. Another in Sauk county, quite
perfect in its resemblance to the form of a man, was of equal length — a veritable colossus;
prone, it is true, and soon to disappear, if it has not already been destroyed, by ravages of a



Online LibraryWestern Historical CoHistory of Walworth County, Wisconsin, containing an account of its settlement, growth, development and resources...its war record, biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and early settlers; the whole preceded by a history of Wisconsin...and an abstract of its laws and constitution.. → online text (page 1 of 165)