Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 100 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 100 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.






Do.


Wickliffe 15. Klstuu











104th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was recruited almost exclusively from the counties of Stark, Columbiana,
Summit, and Portage. It was organized at Camp Massillon, was mustered into the ser-
vice on the 30th of August, 1862, and left Camp Massillon for Cincinnati on the 1st of
September. On its arrival at Cincinnati it was taken across the Ohio River to Covington, and
went into camp three miles out on the Alexandria Turnpike. Kirbv Smith was then besieging
Cincinnati, and the regiment acted as the outpost-guard of the National lines. Remaining in its
first camp a few days, it was then transferred to Covington, and sent out to Fort Mitchel. At
this point the advanced pickets of the Rebel forces were met and skirmished with, the regiment
losing one man killed and five wounded. The Rebel loss was double as great, both in killed and
wounded. This was the first and only blood spilled in defense of Cincinnati.

On September 12th the regiment marched in pursuit of the Rebel army toward Lexington.
This, being its first march, was very severe on the men. The roads were dusty, the springs dried
up, and being without tents, the men, all unused as they were to exposure, suffered intensely.

Lexington was reached at daylight on the loth of October, a few hours after the rear-guard
of the Rebel army had evacuated the place. The regiment remained in Lexington until the 6th
of December. While here the drill and discipline of the regiment was attended to with such
success as to carry off the palm in a review of the forces at that place, the commanding officer
deciding that the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio had attained the highest state of discipline of
any regiment in his command.

On the morning of December 6th the regiment resumed its line of march, and bivouacked
on the bank of the Kentucky River, at Clay's Ferry. The next day's march brought it to Rich-
mond, Kentucky. The brigade consisted of the One Hundredth, Forty-Fourth, and One Hun-
dred and Fourth Ohio, and the Nineteenth Ohio Battery, under command of Colonel S. A. Gil-
bert, of the Forty-Fourth Ohio. While at Richmond, Kentucky, the command built formidable
earthworks.

Vol. II.— 36.



562 Ohio in the War.

On December 27tli the march was resumed, and the regiment reached Danville, Kentucky,
the following evening. This movement was for the purpose of intercepting John Morgan's
guerrilla force, then operating in that vicinity. Beyond slight skirmishing nothing occurred.
From Danville it went to Frankfort, arriving there in January, 18G3. It performed provost-
duty at this place until February 21st. While the brigade was in camp at Frankfort the Forty-
Fourth Ohio was mounted.

On the evening of the 21st of February the regiment took up the line of march toward
Danville Shortly after it started a furious snow-storm commenced, through which it, with
difficulty, made its way, reaching, late at night, the Kentucky Military Institute, in which
it took up its quarters. Before daylight the next morning the march was resumed, and con-
tinued steadily all that day, the regiment reaching Harrodsburg late at night. The next morn-
ing it went into Danville, expecting to engage Morgan's cavalry at that point, but the enemy was
not found.

The regiment continued to operate in that quarter of Kentucky, watching and checkmating
the movements of the Rebel forces under Morgan, Pegram, and Clnke, until the following sum-
mer, when it joined General Burnside's army in East Tennessee, arriving at Knoxville about
the 5th of September, 18G3. The duties performed by the One Hundred anil Fourth Ohio, while
in Kentucky, were arduous and harassing, it being obliged to march and counter-march contin-
ually up and down and through almost the entire country. During the retreat of the National
forces under General S. P. Carter, from Danville to Lexington, the regiment lost twenty-five men
captured. In all the towns in which the regiment encamped in Kentucky, it maintained its
discipline and earned a good name. Before leaving Kentucky the One Hundred and Fourth
Ohio was placed in the First Brigade, Third Division, Twenty-Third Army Corps, under
General Hartsuff.

After a short rest at Knoxville the regiment, with its brigade, was ordered to Cumberland
Gap. This march was made with such rapidity as to merit and receive from President Lincoln
a highly complimentary telegram, sent from Washington to General Burnside.

The Gap was reached on the 7th of September. Immediately thereafter a demand for its
surrender was made by General Burnside, and refused. The National troops prepared to carry
it at the point of the bayonet, but before the movement was made the Rebel leader, General Fra-
iler, surrendered his entire command as prisoners of war. The One Hundred and Fourth Ohio
was the first regiment to enter the works. It received the surrender of the Rebel army and
stores. Remaining at the Gap for a few days, the regiment, with its brigade, returned to Knox-
ville. Just after this time it accompanied General Burnside in an expedition to Carter's Station,
on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, and returned again to Knoxville, where, for some
weeks, it performed provost-duty.

Nothing of importance occurred until the siege of Knoxville by Longstreet's Rebel corps, in
the latter part of November. During the siege the brigade to which the regiment was attached
acted as a reserve force, but being ordered to the south side of Holston River, it had a spirited
engagement with the enemy. The enemy was repulsed with considerable loss.

The regiment then returned to the city and occupied various important positions under fire
up to the raising of the siege, losing some men wounded. During the siege the exposures and
privations endured by the regiment were very great, its rations being limited and inferior in
quality, and the weather cold, drizzly, and disagreeable in the extreme. The men were without
tents, and were compelled to take their rest on the muddy ground.

The One Hundred and Fourth Ohio, with the National army, joined in the pursuit of Long-
street, and followed him up to Blain's Cross Roads, participating in the various skirmishes of
that pursuit. It wintered in this inhospitable region during the whole of that inclement season,
and endured hardships and privations like those suffered by our Revolutionary forefathers at
Valley Forge. Half-starved, half-clad, those brave and self-sacrificing men maintained their
integrity to the old flag, and in the midst of these terrible sufferings declared a willingness to
enter on another three years' term of service, but their enlistment not expiring within the time



One Hundred and Fourth Ohio Infantry. 563

specified they were not permitted to "veteranize." The regiment remained in this portion of
Tennessee until early in April, 1864, when it was ordered to Cleveland, Tennessee, where troops
were assembling preparatory to the Atlanta campaign.

The One Hundred and Fourth Ohio formed part of that campaign, and participated in all
its general engagements. On the 6th of August, in the desperate assault at Utoy Creek, the losa
of the brigade was six hundred killed and wounded. The regiment lost twenty-six officers and
men killed and wounded.

Nothing of importance occurred until the 30th of August, when the regiment accompanied
the army in the flanking movement down to Jonesboro', but did not participate in the engagement
at that place. In the meantime, however, it was engaged in tearing up railroads and guarding
lines of communication. It remained in the vicinity of Jonesboro' until the fall of Atlanta, and
then marched for Decatur.

On October 4, 1864, the regiment left Decatur, and on the same day crossed the Chattahoochie
River fifteen miles from Decatur. It marched with the whole army, maneuvering so as to push
the Rebel General Hood's forces in the direction of Nashville. In this march it passed through
Marietta, Acworth, Allatoona,Cassville, Kingston, Rome, Calhoun, Resaca, and Snake Creek Gap,
into Alabama at Gaylorsville, and finally reached Cedar Bluff', Alabama. At this place it partici-
pated in a reconnoissance to the town of Center.

On October 28th it crossed the Coosa River, and reached Rome, Georgia, on the 30th. The
next point was Dalton, where it took the cars for Nashville, November 6, 1864. At this point the
regiment cast its vote in favor of "veteranizing Abraham Lincoln."

On November 8th the regiment took the cars and went to Spring Hill, Tennessee. Novem-
ber 13th it marched to Columbia, and thence to Pulaski. From Pulaski it fell back to Columbia.
At the last-named point, November 24th, it had a skirmish with a force of Rebel cavalry. From
this time until the night of November 26th daily skirmishing was had with the enemy, and with
great difficulty Duck River was crossed that night. After crossing the river the main army took
position in a semicircle, its right and left flanks resting on the river. While the main force was
in position the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio, with its brigade, occupied the center, guarding
the ford. In this duty it lost Sergeant Betz and private Booker of company H, and private Solo
of company A killed. '

On November 29th the regiment lost from company A privates Evans and Lambertson
killed, and several others stunned by the explosion of a shell thrown from the enemy's lines.
The same night it moved toward Franklin, making a sevtre march of twenty-five miles, reach-
ing that place at daylight the next morning. While at Franklin the regiment, with its brigade,
built breastworks.

The fight at Franklin commenced on the 30th of November, at five o'clock in the afternoon,
and lasted until ten in the evening. This was the most severe engagement the regiment had ever
participated in, and its loss was sixty killed and wounded. Lieutenant William Kimball of
company C, and Captain Bard of company I were killed in this battle. The men went into the
fight with the avowed intention of revenging the loss of their comrades at Utoy Creek, and used
that as their battle-cry. The Rebel General Adams was killed in front of the breastworks occu-
pied by the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio, himself and horse rolling over in front of the regi-
ment. Lieutenant Kimball, who lost his life, fought desperately, throwing hatchets and axes
into the seething mass of Rebels in his front, until a bullet struck him down. Lieutenant Cope
was severely wounded through the arm during the buttle, but wrapping his handkerchief around
the wound, bravely stood his ground throughout the battle. Lieutenant Coughlin, belonging to
the staff* of General Cox, was killed near the regiment while in the act of cheering his men.

After the battle the regiment marched with the National forces to Nashville, bearing with it
eleven battle-flags captured from the enemy. It reached that city on the morning of December
1st, and on the next day took position in the main line in front of Nashville, near Fort Negley.
Nothing occurred of note until the 15th of December, excepting the intense suffering of the men
from cold weather.



564 Ohio in the War.

On December 15th the corps to which the regiment belonged moved to the right to support
the cavalry, and lost in a skirmish with the enemy three men wounded. On the 16th the whole
line made a charge, the brigade capturing the line of works in its front with eight pieces of
artillery and a number of prisoners, without the loss of a man. Resting in the enemy's works
that night, the regiment moved the next morning on the Granny "White Turnpike in pursuit of
the enemy, and did not stop, with the exception of a short halt at Columbia, until Clifton, Ten-
nessee, was reached, January 6, 1865.

It remained in camp at this place until January 16th, when it embarked- on board of the
flteamer Swallow, and, landing at Cincinnati, took the cars, January 22d, for Washington City.
From thence it was transferred, by ihe steamer Star of the South, to Federal Point, near Fort
Fisher, North Carolina, arriving there February 9th.

On February 16th the regiment crossed Cape Fear River and landed at Smithville, North
Carolina. February 18th it advanced toward Fort Anderson and skirmished with the Rebels,
losing John Hammond, company E, killed; Lieutenant Reed, company I, wounded through both
legs; Orderly Sergeant Whitney, company I, Sergeant Martin, company A, and private Weaver,
wounded. February 20th, at Old Town Creek, the regiment, with its division, charged the
enemy, captured a number of prisoners, four field-pieces, and a large quantity of small arms.
The loss of the regiment was two killed and twenty wounded. February 22d the brigade entered
the city of Wilmington, where it performed provost-duty until the 4th of March, 1865, when it
was relieved. It then made a forced march to Kingston to the relief of General Cox, who was
threatened by overpowering numbers.

On March 20th the regiment left Kingston and marched to Goldsboro', arriving there the next
day. At this place it remained until the 11th of April, when it went to Raleigh, North Carolina,
arriving there on the 15th. At the grand review in Raleigh, on the 21st of April, the regiment
received some high compliments from General Sherman and others for its efficiency of drill and
soldierly bearing.

The One Hundred and Fourth Ohio remained in Raleigh until May 2d, when it was selected
by General Cox, commanding the corps, to repair to Greensboro', North Carolina, and receive the
arms and stores of Johnston's Rebel army. This duty performed, the regiment remained in
Greensboro' as provost-guard until June 17, 1865, when it was mustered out and ordered to report
to Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, for final pay and discharge. It arrived in Cleveland on the
24th, and on the 27th of June was paid off and discharged.



One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Infantry.



565



105th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.




ALBERT S. HALL

WM. K. TOLLED

GEORGE T. PERKINS....


Aug.

July
Feb.
Aug.
July
Feb.
Aug.
July
Feb.
Aug.

Sept.
June
Sept.
July

Aug.

Oct.

Dec.
Jan.

July

May
Feb.

March

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

July

Aug.

Oct.

Dec.
Jan.

March

.May

July

Hay

Feb.

May

Sept.
Oct.

July

Aug.
Oct.


11, 1862

10, 1863
18, 1864
9, 1862
10, 1863

18. 1864
15, l.>62
10, 1S63

15, 1864

19, 1.S62

19, "

4, "
29, 1863
26, 1862
23, "
23, "

23, "

24, "

28, "
1, "
6, "
9, "
9, "

10, "

20, "
8, "

8, "

22, "
13, 1863
IT, "

29, "

16, "

10, "

12, "
18, 1864

18, '•

21, ||

24,' "
3, "

9, 1862

11, '•

16, "

19, "

23, "
23, "

23, "

*• "

l'i "

1. "

8, "
8, "
8, "

22, "
21. 1863

17, "
1.3, "
29, "

18, "
28, "

!■'>» "

10, "

12, "
IS, 1864
IS, "
18, "
18, "

25, "
25, "

8, "

24, "
24, "
24, "

11, 1862

23, "
23, "
23, "

23, "

24, "

25, "
6, "

9, "
10, "

5, "


Aug.

July
Feb.
Aug.
July
Feb.
Aug.
July
Feb.
Aug.

Sept.
June
Oct.
Aug.

Dec.

Jan.
Feb.

Aug.

Feb.

Marcb

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Aug.

Dec.

Jan.
*eb.

April
Aug.

Feb.

May

Sept.
Oct.

Aug.
Dec.


25, 1862
16, 1863
18, 1864
25, ls62
16, 1S63
18, 1864
25, ls6:
16, 1863

18, 1861
25, 1862
25, "

4, "
29, 1S63

1, 1862
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "

9, "

9, "
28, 1863

19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
25, "
25, "
18, 1864
18, "
21, "

8, "

24, "

2i, 1862

25, ' •
25 "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "


Died July 10, 1863.

Resigned as Lieutenant-Colonel Jan. 9, 18?3.

Mustered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.


Do ...

Do




Do






Do




Mustered out with regiment as Major.






Do






Do




Resigned as Captain September 23, 1864.








Honorably discharged February 19, 1866.

Resigned April 8, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died February 27, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned August 20, 1862.

Resigned January 17, ls63.

Promoted ; resigned September 23, 1864.


Do.




Do.




Chaplain




Do




Do




Do




Do


Byron W. CanfieW


Do


Sherbourn H. Williams




Do




Do






Do






Do






Do






Do


\\ m. K. Tuttle




Do






Do






Do


Alfred G. Wilcox


-Mustered out with ngiuieut.


Do




Do






Do


Andrew D. Braden


.Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged April 26, 1865.


Do




Do


W'm. Wallace


Do




Do


.Marshal W. Wright

Daniel B. Stambaugh

John C. Hartzell




Do




Do




Do






Do


Win. 11. Tuttle








Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do


Win. 11. Clark




Do.
Do.




Resigned January 21, 1863.


Do.


.Marshal W. Wright




Do.






Do.


Alfred G. Wilcox




Do.




9, "
9, "
2s, 1863
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
9, "

25, "

25, "
18, 1864
18, "
IS, "
18, "
25, "
25, "

8, "
24, "
24, "

24, "

25, 1862
15, "
25, "
25, "
2.5, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, •'

9, "




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


John C. Hartzell




Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


Peyton Himrod


Promoted to Captain.


Do.
Do.




Promoted to Captain.


Do.






Do.
Do.
Do.


Win. II. Castle


Discharged January 10, lsoo.
Mustered out June 28, 1865.


Do.

Do.


Norman D. Smith „


Mustered out with regiment.


Do.


Win. C. Olds




Do.






Do.
Do.


George W. Cheney


Mustered out with regiment as Q. M. Serg't.








Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


Alonzo Chubb


Resigned October 19, 1863.


Do.






Do.
Do.
Do.


John C. Hartzell

Leverett A. Barnard

Albeit Dickerman


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



566



Ohio in the War.



RANK.


NAME.


li ATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.






Oct.
Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

Cob.

.Inly
May


s, west

li] 1*3

21, *'

17, "
13, "

18, "
29, "
12, "
2(1, "
28, "
2(1, "

8, "
10, "
12, "
15, "

12, "

13, "


Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

April
Aug.


9, 1862
28, 1863
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
9, "
9, "
9, "
14, "
10, "

2.% "
25, "
2.">, "
25, "


Died February 20, 18»"3.


no.

Do.


Horatio M. Smith


Promoted to 1st Lieutennnt.


Do.






1)0.


Win. Wallace




Do.
Do.




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned May 8, 1863.


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


Inlius A. Moffit


Died January 14, 1m>3.
Resigned August 13, 18i"'3.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.
Do.




Do.






Do.






Do.


Will. C Olds




Do.













105th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFAINTTRY.



THE ONEHUNDEED ANDFIFTHOHIOms peculiarly a Western Reserve
regiment, composed of citizens of the counties of Lake, Ashtabula, Geauga, Trumbull,
and Mahoning. The regiment was mustered into the United States service on the 20th
and 21st of August, 1862, at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, Ohio. Tlie companies were raised as
follows: A and H from Mahoning; G, K, and part of Ffrom Lake; E and part of F from Geauga;
B, C, and I from Geauga and Trumbull. Companies A and C were made up largely of miners.
The other companies were composed principally of farmers, with a moderate number of clerks,
teachers, and students, and comparatively a small number of professional men- and mechanics.
The last company was mustered in at ten o'clock on the morning of August 21st, and in one
hour the regiment, one thousand and thirteen strong, was on the march to the depot of the
Cleveland and Cincinnati Railroad, under orders to leave the State. It arrived in Covington,
Kentucky, on the morning of August 22d, being the first regiment to leave the State organized
under the call of August 4, 1862. Its first company rendezvoused at Camp Taylor, August 11th,
and ninety-five per cent, of the entire regiment was enlisted after August 1st. It remained at
Covington three days, the men receiving their advance bounty and one month's pay.

Having been fully armed and equipped for the field, the regiment left Covington August
25th, by rail, for Lexington, where it arrived the same day. At Lexington it was assigned to a
brigade commanded by Colonel Charles Anderson, of the Ninety -Third Ohio. Much confusion
and excitement prevailed around Lexington at the time of the arrival of the One Hundred and
Fifth, and the regiment had every prospect of an immediate engagement with the enemy. Gen-
eral Kirby Smith was advancing from Cumberland Gap toward Lexington, and the most ener-
getic preparations were being made to meet him.

On the 30th of August the One Hundred and Fifth, with several other regiments, received
orders to march for Richmond, Kentucky, with all possible dispatch, for the purpose of re-en-
forcing General Nelson. Before reaching that place, however, the battle had been fought and
lost. A halt was made at the Kentucky River until the remnants of Nelson's command could
come up, when they returned to Lexington. The Rebels in large force menacing Lexington, it
was ordered that the city should be evacuated. Hasty preparations were made for the departure
of our forces. On the night of September 1st the last of the column left for Louisville. The



One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Infantry. 567

march was a forced one. Colonel Hall, of the One Hundred and Fifth, asked the privilege of
bringing up the rear, and was allowed to do so. The troops were all new, and, as is usual with
that class of soldiers, were loaded down with baggage. The weather was intensely warm. There
had been a drouth in the country marched over, and water was exceedingly scarce; and such
was the supposed urgency of the retreat that the column was pushed forward with great haste,
giving the men little or no time to quench their thirst when water was found. The One Hun-
dred and Fifth being in the rear, fared badly, as the foremost regiments almost invariably
exhausted the wells and creeks, leaving but the muddy dregs for their companions in the rear.
At times the thirst was overpowering, and each day men fell down from sun-stroke, apparently
dead. However, the march was completed, the One Hundred and Fifth faithfully performing
its duty as rear-guard, not only to the retreating force, but acted as a support to a section of artil-
lery totally unprovided with ammunition. All along the weary, dusty way, "scares" occurred,
and frequent stands were made against a supposed but invisible foe, involving detours across and
through cornfields, always, of course, on the "double-quick." This march was the baptismal
campaign of the One Hundred and Fifth, and it told sadly on both officers and men. As yet no
tents had been drawn, and the men were compelled to lie down upon the naked ground after
enduring the terrible heat and dust of the day. The march was completed September 5th, the
men arriving at Louisville footsore and exhausted. Many were afflicted with chronic diarrhea
and fevers, the majority of whom never recovered, but were discharged or died in hospital.

At Louisville the regiment was assigned to a brigade commanded by Brigadier-General
Terril!, in a division commanded by Brigadier-General Jackson, which afterward became the
Thirty-Third Brigade, Tenth Division, army under General Buell. Much apprehension was
felt at Louisville at the time in consequence of General Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and the
troops were at once ordered to throw up works and prepare for a vigorous defense.

General Nelson, recovering from his wound received at Richmond, took command of the
arm}-,, and the utmost vigor and watchfulness were manifested, and every precaution taken to
prevent surprise. The arrival of General Buell with his army allayed all fears, and the
remainder of the time at Louisville was spent in drilling and making thorough preparations for
an early campaign against the Rebel forces under General Bragg. Still the One Hundred and
Fifth entered upon this fall campaign with comparatively little knowledge of tactics and field
maneuvering.

Leaving Louisville October 1st, the regiment marched, via Taylorsville and Bloomfield, to
Perryville, where it was engaged (October 8th) in the battle of that name. After marching
some eight or ten miles on the morning of the 8th, making frequent halts the vicinity of the
coming contest was reached, but it was not until afternoon that the battle commenced at the
point where the One Hundered and Fifth was stationed. The regiment moved rapidly forward



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 100 of 165)