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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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and formed at the base of a ridge, where it awaited orders. Two companies had been sent out
as skirmishers, but they rejoined the regiment at this point. Another regiment, the One Hun-
dred and Twenty-Third Illinois, and Parsons's battery, had been assigned a position further to
the front and left. This regiment and battery soon became engaged, and the One Hundred and
Fifth was ordered to their support. Moving by the right flank, and on the double-quick, it
passed in rear of the battery for the purpose of forming on its left. Before reaching its position
it received a volley from a Rebel regiment at short range, and at once halted, faced by the rear
rank, and opened fire. The smoke of their guns had hardly cleared away before another Rebel
regiment, within fifty yards, rose up out of the tall grass, that completely concealed it, and fired
another volley. Parsons's battery had been posted without any support near it, and within fifty
yards of the nearest concealed line of Rebel infantry. At the time the One Hundred and Fifth
came up most of the guns of Parsons's battery had been silenced, more than half its horses shot
down, and many of its men killed and wounded. At the first volley from the One Hundred and
Fifth the Rebel lines, three or four deep gradually moved forward, firing as they advanced, and
ewcpt the ridge where the battery and the One Hundred and Fifth stood. In the rear of the
Rebel lines of infantry, on another ridge, were posted their batteries, which did terrible execution.



568 Ohio in the War.

General Terrill seeing the gradual advance of the enemy, ordered Major Perkins to have the men
fix bayonets, move forward, and try to save the guns. The enemy seeing the movement, opened
with renewed vigor. Fresh troops sprang up; new volleys smote the advancing National line.
It faltered, wavered, and fell back to its former position. The enemy rushed forward and suc-
ceeded in taking the guns. The lines were now almost within pistol-shot. A second time, led
on by the gallant Terrill and Major Perkins, the left wing moved forward against the foe, now
6warming around the silenced guns, and with exultant cheers were pouring their destructive vol-
leys into our line. On the left the enemy had forced back the One Hundred and Twenty-Third
Illinois, turned the flank of the One Hundred and Fifth, and turned the guns on the National
lines. The line again wavered, but the men were still unwilling to retreat. At length General
Terrill, seeing that further resistance was hopeless, gave the order to fall back. The order was
obeyed, and the men retired slowly at first, but, under the merciless fire of the Rebels, the ranks
broke, the companies became scattered, and order was lost. General Terrill and Colonel Hall
succeeded, however, in keeping together a few hundred men from different regiments, and these
fell back from one position to another, until they finally formed in rear of a battery, which they
supported until night closed the contest. Here fell General Terrill, mortally wounded. Gen-
eral Jackson had been killed early in the engagement; and Colonel Webster, commanding the
other (thirty-fourth) brigade, having been mortally wounded, Colonel Hall, being the senior
officer in the division, took command. Before the battle commenced Lieutenant-Colonel Tolles
had been sent out in charge of a skirmish-line to protect the left flank, and did not rejoin the
regiment until after it had fallen back from its first position, where the battery stood. Thus
closed the first battle in which the regiment was engaged. How well they fought the long list
of killed and wounded will show. Captain L. Dwight McKee was killed ; five other officers
were wounded, one (Captain Robert Wilson) mortally. Forty-seven men were killed and two
hundred and twelve wounded ; many of whom afterward died. The One Hundred and Fifth
went into the battle eight hundred strong, so that thirty-three and one-third per cent, were struck.

After the battle the regiment, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Tolles, marched via Har-
rodsburg to Danville. Colonel Hall was here relieved of the command of the division by Brig-
adier-General Robert S. Granger, and took command of the brigade. At Danville the brigade
was detached from the main army, and ordered to Munfordsville ina Lebanon, where it arrived
October 25th. It remained there up to the 30th of November, performing post and guard-duty.
Time being had for drill at this place, great proficiency was made, and the regiment now became
fairly organized. On leaving Munfordsville it marched to Glasgow; thence to Carthage, Ten-
nessee.

After leaving Kentucky the brigade was ordered to Hartsville, on the Cumberland River,
where a brigade of National Troops had just been captured by the Rebel John Morgan. Re-
maining at Hartsville but one night, the regiment marched thence to Bledsoe's Creek, about six
miles from Gallatin, and encamped. While here the brigade was assigned to the Twelfth
Division of the army, commaned by Brigadier-General J. J. Reynolds, and participated (with
the division) in the pursuit of John Morgan, going as far as Cave City. The division was then
ordered to return and join the main army at Murfreesboro'. This diversion after John Morgan
prevented the One Hundred and Fifth from being engaged in the battle of Stone River. The
division reached Stone River January 11, 1863, marching through Bowling Green and Nashville.
A permanent assignment was here made, making Hall's (the second) and Reynolds's (the fifth)
brigade, soon afterward the Fourth Division of the Fourteenth Corps.

The One Hundred and Filth remained at Murfreesboro' until June, frequently accompany-
ing the brigade and division in reconnoissances. On the 20th of March the brigade was engaged
at Milton, about fourteen miles from Murfreesboro', with John Morgan's command, and inflicted
on that Rebel chieftain a severe chastisement. This engagement had a most favorable effect
upon the men of the One Hundred and Fifth, who fought at Perryville. They learned that
by a judicious disposition of forces men may be able to stand their ground, though largely out-
numbered. When the enemy made their assault, which was bold and impetuous, it was met



One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Infantry. 569

■with a steadiness that hurled them back in the utmost confusion ; and a second and third attempt
resulted in the same way. The engagement finally settled down into a spirited artillery duel,
which lasted nearly the entire afternoon.

On June 24th the regiment broke camp to participate in the Tullahoma campaign. Colonel
Hall and Lieutenant-Colonel Tolles were both left at Murfreesboro' sick, and Colonel Hall died
there on the 10th of July. Lieutenant-Colonel Tolles obtained leave of absence, and returned to
his home to recruit his health. Colonel Robinson (Seventy-Fifth Indiana) succeeded to.tlie com-
mand of the brigade and Major Perkins to that of the regiment. In common with the rest of
the army it shared in the fatigues of this brief campaign, which resulted in driving Bragg from
his position at Tullahoma, and sending him across the Tennessee River. It lay encamped at
University Mountain some time, during the warmest weather, at which Colonel King (Sixty-
Eighth Indiana) was assigned to the command of the brigade.

On August 30th the regiment crossed the Tennessee River at Shellmound, and moved with
the army to intercept Bragg and compel the evacuation of Chattanooga. Lookout Mountain
was crossed September 11th and 12th. September 19th and 20th the regiment was engaged at
Chickamauga. On Saturday (the 19th) it followed the fortunes of the day, meeting witli no
decided success or repulse, but did hard fighting. At two different times the regiment on its
right gave way without apparent cause, and once also the regiment on its left fell back some dis-
tance, but it remained quiet, and was highly complimented by the brigade commander, who,
besides being Colonel of the Sixty-Eighth Indiana, was Lieutenant-Colonel of the Nineteenth
Regular Infantry, and an officer of mature years and extensive experience. On Sunday (the
20th) about three o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of General Woods withdrawing his
division from the lines, a gap was .made, which the enemy quickly took advantage of. The
troops of Brannan's division were flanked and fell back in confusion. Reynolds's division was
posted next on the left of Brannan's. General Reynolds, seeing that his flank would soon be
exposed and wholly unprotected, ordered Major Perkins to change front with his regiment and
charge the Rebels on the flank as they advanced. The regiment was at this time in the second
line of battle, and was lying down. The danger was imminent and the task anything but
inviting. The Rebels on the right were cheering each other on, and evidently thought to follow
up their success by throwing our entire line into confusion. At the word of command the regi-
ment sprang to its feet, executed the change of front with as much precision as though on parade,
and started forward with deafening yells, on the double-quick, to what seemed certain destruc-
tion. The suddenness of the movement, the thick growing underbrush, which prevented the
enemy from seeing the comparatively few numbers advancing against them ; the unevenness of
the ground, which compelled the men to extend their front — all operated favorably. The desired
object was produced, and the first line of the enemy was thrown back upon the second; upon
reaching which the regiment halted and opened fire in gallant style, keeping it up for several
minutes. Major Perkins soon discovered that his left flank was exposed, and he was compelled to
withdraw by the right flank in haste. However, the onset of the enemy was checked and time
given to General Reynolds to make such disposition as secured his right flank, and prevented
further disaster to the army. This prompt movement of the One Hundred and Fifth was highly
commended by General Reynolds at the time, and afterward by General Rosecrans. Its gallant
commander, Major Perkins, was wounded in this charge and conveyed to the rear, and was ren-
dered unfit for duty for nearly four months. The other casualties of the regiment were: Cap-
tain E. A. Spaulding, mortally wounded; three other officers seriously; and seventy-five men
killed, wounded, and prisoners. Two of the largest companies were not in the engagement,
being on detached duty, so that, in proportion to the number engaged, the casualties were very
heavy.

Chattanooga was reached September 23d, and the regiment lay there with the army, doing
heavy fatigue-duty and living on very short rations, until November 23d. Lieutenant-Colonel
Tolles had rejoined the regiment (November 19th) from sick-leave. At this time General Grant
had arrived at Chattanooga. General Sherman's army had arrived from Memphis, and General



in



Ohio in the War.



Hooker's command (Eleventh and Twelfth Corps) lay in Lookout Valley. On the 23d of No-
vember the old Army of the Cumberland moved out of camp and took position in front of the
town. While lying at Chattanooga the army had been reorganized, and the One Hundred and
Fifth had been assigned to Colonel Vanderveer's (second) brigade, Brigadier-General A. Laird's
(third) division, Fourteenth Corps. The One Hundred and Fifth took part in the maneuver-
ing of the 23d and 24th, and on the 25th participated in the battle of Mission Kidge. Laird's
division formed the extreme left of the Army of the Cumberland. The brigade was in the cen-
ter of the division, and the regiment was in the center of the rear line, the brigade being formed
in two lines. The troops of the first line of battle, as soon as they reached the top of the ridge,
deployed rapidly and fought as skirmishers. The One Hundred and Fifth, as it reached the top
of the iid"-e halted in order to re-form the line, which had become somewhat disordered in
climbin™ the hill. As soon as formed it moved forward, and was the first regiment of the divis-
ion that moved, in regular line of battle, to the support of the troops of the first line, who were
deployed. The other regiments came up promptly; and the entire division being massed in a
small compass, it concentrated a heavy fire upon that portion of the Rebel army remaining on
the ridge, which, after a few volleys, broke and ran down the opposite side of the ridge. The
loss of the regiment in this engagement was comparatively slight. Joining in the pursuit to
Ringgold, Georgia, it returned to Chattanooga and went into camp. Major Perkins rejoined the
regiment in January, IS'ol.

After participating in a reconnoissance to Euzzard's Roost Gap, the regiment left camp and
ctarted on the Atlanta campaign with General Sherman. In this long and fatiguing campaign
of many skirmishes and battles, the One Hundred and Fifth made a good record. Although not
immediately engaged in any of the heavy engagements, its casualties were heavy.

On September Sth the regiment returned from Goldsboro', whither (with the army) it had
gone to compel the evacuation of Atlanta, and went into camp at the latter place. Colonel Per-
kins obtained leave of absence while here, and Major Edwards took command. On the 3d of
October the regiment joined in the pursuit of Hood, and followed him to Gaylesville, Alabama.
This march was fatiguing, but the regiment was not engaged. From Gaylesville it went to
Rome, Georgia, and thence to Kingston, where it arrived November 7, 1SG-1; thence to Atlanta,
destroying the railroads on their route. With the Fourteenth Corps the regiment moved east
from Atlanta, on the railroad to Augusta, destroying the railroad as it advanced, until Coving-
ton was reached, a town about fifty miles east of Atlanta, when the column turned south, moving
on Milledgeville, where it arrived November 23d. On the 25th the corps moved east, crossing
the Oconee and Ogeechee Rivers, and passing through the towns of Sandersonville and Louis-
ville reaching a point midway between Millen and Waynesboro'. At this point the division was
detailed to support the cavalry under General Kilpatrick. On this campaign the regiment was
not engaged, but performed its whole duty.

January 20, 1865, found the One Hundred and Fifth again on the march, going up the west
side of the Savannah to Sister's Ferry, where it crossed into South Carolina. Their duty was
most fatiguing, tearing up and destroying railroads, building corduroy roads, etc. After cross-
ing the Savannah River the corps passed through Barnwell C. H. ; thence north, crossing the
Charleston and Augusta Railroad and the North and South Edisto Rivers. The Saluda River
was crossed six and the Broad twelve miles west of Columbia. Passing through Winnsboro',
the Catawba River was reached and crossed February 27th ; thence moving in a north-easterly
direction, the Great Pedee was crossed March 7th and Fayetteville reached March 11th. Up to
this point the campaign had been the severest the troops of this marching army had ever expe-
rienced. After leaving the Catawba River it rained everyday; the roads were badly cut up,
and had to be corduroyed in order to get the trains along. At times men and animals would
cease their labors from sheer exhaustion; yet from fifteen to eighteen miles per day were made.
The army rested four days at Fayetteville. Baird's division was detailed to guard the corps-
trains, as it had the advance of the corps from the Great Pedee to Fayetteville. Goldsboro' was
reached March 23d.



One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Infantry. 571

After a lapse of sixty-three days this great campaign was closed by an informal review of the
troops as they came into town, passing before Generals Sherman and Schofieid, and the familiar
faces of the Twenty-Third Corps. The difference between this and the subsequent Washington
review was very marked. Here was seen the army as it appeared in the field. Full twenty-five
per cent, of the men were barefooted; they were ragged and dirty; many in citizens' dress, and
some in Rebel uniform. That at Washington may have dazzled by its pomp and precision of
movements, but it was tame compared to that at Goldsboro'.

Afer receiving clothing and other necessary supplies the army left Goldsboro' April 10th,
and, a.'ter four days' skirmishing with the Rebel cavalry, arrived at Raleigh on the evening of
the 13:h. Before General Johnston had made any proposition for a cessation of hostilities a
prompt pursuit had been ordered, and on the following morning the Fourteenth Corps took the
advance toward Charlotte. It was finally halted at Cape Fear River, and remained there until
Johnston had surrendered.

On April 29th the corps started for Richmond, where it arrived May 7th. In this march a
break-neck race took place between the different army corps as to which should first reach Rich-
mond. Although orders had been issued that the troops should not march more than fifteen
miles per day, thirty-five miles were made on two or three different days. Several lives were
lost by reason of this march.

On May 24th the regiment took part in the review at Washington ; was mustered out at
Washington June 2d, and started for Cleveland the same day, where it arrived on the oth. It
was paid off and disbanded on the 8th. It was the first regiment to leave Cleveland in 1862,
under the call of August 4.h of that year, and the first disbanded from that camp in 1S65.

Eighteen men of the One Hundred and Fifth were promoted and held positions as commis-
sioned officers of the regiment. Three men were discharged to accept appointments in other
regiments.

Of the thirty-seven officers that went into the field with the regiment, but eleven returned to
be mustered out with it. All but one (the Surgeon) had been promoted.

Of the one thousand and thirteen men who left Cleveland in 1862, only four hundred and
twenty-seven were mustered out there in 1865.

About one hundred and fifty recruits had bsen received, and these were transferred to the
Thirty-Eighth Ohio when the One Hundred and Fifth left Washington.

The regiment took up its line of march at Lexington, Kentucky, and halted at Washington
City ; marching, including its various reconnoissances, counter-marches, etc., more than four
thousand miles.



572 Ohio in the War.

106th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK



COM. ISSUED.



BEMAKKS.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel...

Major

Surgeon

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Captain

Do

D

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Di

D<

Do

Do

Do

D

Do

Do

Do

Do

l/o

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2il Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



GEO. B. WRIGHT

GlsTAVUS Tafel

Lauhitz Bakk.ntzen...

Georor A. spies

Adoi.ph Sciikoen

KlliF.NF. RtNCLEB

Adolpii Schkoen

A. K. W'ksthrook

Wm. Y. Gholson, jr....

Frederick Seibel

Louis Kauffman

Edw aid Lewis

John Vertossey ,

Theodore Biose

Herman Kefntanz

M. Lichtendahl

Benj. Ruli

Frederick Baiiman

Win. Hcy.lt

Louis Autenrieth

Ignatz Szabo

Philip Wich

Andrew W. Billing

Charles Bchleyer

Got r tried Biodersou...,

Wolfgang Schoeule

Pet r Weldner

Charles Luster

Theodore Autenrieth...

Win. Ittig

.John II. Stallo

Frederick J. Werner....

Julius Dexter

Win. He>«lt ,

Andrew W. Billing

Louis Son tag

Ignatz Szabo

Charles Schleyer

Philip Wicl

Louis Auteniieth

Herman Seipd

Peter llirechauer

Frank Eiselein

W. Joseph Potocke

Jacob Qessert

Gottfried B;o lei son....

Wolfgang Schoeule

Henry Wielert

Peter Weill ner

Gu.-tavus Bertgold

Cliarles Luster ,

Theodore Autenrieth...

Wm. It tig

Thomas Wortliiiigton .

Julius Georgi

George Goat-

lenry Schwartz

Julius C. Ileintz

lohn Gerteiseu

George La u her

Win. Mauter

Wm. Biusack

Benj. Hull

Ferdinand Stantield

Jacob Gesseit

Gottfried Brodeioon....

Frank Eiselein

James Wintei held

Henry Wielert

Henry Stein

lohn OitinT

christian Bauiuan

W. Joseph Potocke

Wolfgang Schoeule

Charles Luster

Tlieodoie Autenrieth...

Peter Weidner

Dakar Von Biaheuder..

Wm. Ittig

Gerhard! Meyer

Theodore Falk

Thomas Wortliiiigton .

John Gerteiseu

George La u her

Win. Mauter

Wm. Harkaeniper.

Win. Binsack

Frederick G'-lger

Charles M. Trautiiiau .

Julius Georgi

Louis Brandt



^ept.
Feb.



Oct.
July



Nov.
Jan.
Dec.



April
Aug.

Sept.

May

Aug.



Oct.

Nov.

Ian.

Dec.

Nov,

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

April

March



April



Aug.
Jan.



Oct.
Aug.
Oct.

Nov.

Jan.
Dec.
Nov.

Dec.

Nov.

Feb.

April



Doc.
April



22, L-62
22,

4,

21, 1*3
18, 1
24, 1*2
2t, 1*3

24, 1862
II, "
II, "
11, "
II, "

20, "
22 "

23, "

6, lsr.4
fi, "

18, 1862

17, 1*3

7, 1862
7, "

21, 1864
21, "
21, "

21, "
2, "

II, "
2*. "
23, 1865
11, 1862
7, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
211, "

20, "

22, "

25, "

6, 1*4
•>. "
9, 1*2

27, 1863

7, 1862

18, "
7, "

17, 1863

10, "
lit, "

21, 1864
21, "
21, "
21, "

21. "
2, "
2, "

2, "

11, "
6, 1*5
6, "
6, "

11, 1S62
II, "
11, "

11, "

22. "
22, "

is,' "

6, 1*4

6, "

3, 1-52
U, "

30, 1863

7, 1*2

18, "

7. ji

3,' "

21, 1S«.°,

iy, "

2, I8H4
2, "
2, "
2, "
2, "
2, "
2, "

12, 1863
2, 1864



Nov. 11,
" 11,

II.
March 25,



Feb.
Nov.
July
Nov.



Oct,



March 25



1864

181/3



" 21,

21,

21,

" 21,

April 2,

Aug. II,

Sept.

May

Nov.

II,
11,



W
1862



Nov. 20,
March 25,

25,



25,

at,

" 29,

March 21,
" 21,
21,
21,
21,
2,
2,
2,
11,



April



April



Aug.
Jan.



1*5
IS''.?



1864

lsf,9



March 25,

25,

" 25,

25,

" 25,

" 25,

25,

April 27,



March II.
April 2,



Discharged per B. O. 107, March 5, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

On detached duty .

({'■signed February 21, 18IV3.

Resigned January 30, I8H4.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mustereii out with regiment.

Killed December 7, 1*2.

Resigned November IS, 1862.

Discharged April 16, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 13, 1883.

Killed Dei ember 7, 1862.

Kisigned January 17, 1853.

Mustered out witli leginient.

tiesi-'iieil January 6, 1*5.

Honorably discharged December 17. 1864.

Honorably discharged October 15, 1863.

Mustered oat with regiment.

Honorably discharged August 14, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Dei lined; commission returned.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined; commission returned.

Mustered out with leginient.

Mustered out with regimuut.

Resigned April 19, 1863.

Resigned January 5, 1*5.

Resigned November 9, 1*2.

Promoted t-j Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February in, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Pi- nioted to Captain.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regimeut.

Resigned Jannaiv 27, 1*3.

Discharged May 25, 1*3.

Resigned March 18, 1*4.

Promoted; resigned as 1st Lieut. June 16, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 8, 1*3.

Piomoted to Captain.

Killed June 30, 1883.

Died November 27, 1*4.

Promoted to Captain.

Piomoted to Captain.

.Mustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment. ,

Mustereii out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regimeut.

Resigned January 30, I8(i3.

Resigned May 30. 1*3.

Promoted to let Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1-t Lieutenant November 9, 1862.

Resigned February 21, 1*3.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned November 3, 1*2.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Piomoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned Julv 12, 1863.

Honorably discharged October 18, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Piomoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Never mustered.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with leginient.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 101 of 165)