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Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.



One Hundred and Sixth Ohio Infantry. 573



106th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTHY.



THIS was one of the last German regiments raised in Ohio, and was contemplated as
early as July, 1862. During that month Governor Tod telegraphed to Lieutenant
Gustavus Tafel, then of company A, Ninth Ohio, stationed at Tnscumbia, Alabama,
informing him that he had been chosen to attempt the raising of another German regiment, south
of the National Road, in Ohio. Lieutenant Tafel accepted the trust, but, from various reasons,
was much delayed in reporting to the Governor at Columbus, Ohio. Although other enter-
prises of the same kind were in the field, before him, Lieutenant Tafel succeeded in recruiting
and organizing, within a few weeks, eight companies, with an aggregate of seven hundred and
thirty men, and went into Camp Dennison preparatory to the completion of the regimental
organization.

On the 4th day of September the regiment was suddenly ordered to Covington, Kentucky,
opposite Cincinnati, to be in readiness to aid in repelling the Rebel forces under General Kirby
Smith, then threatening Cincinnati. On reaching its destination the regiment was stationed on
the Lexington Pike, back of Fort Mitchel, and from thence marched over to the Tunnel Batte-
ries, where a sight, at least, was had of the "boys in gray." The Rebel General Heath, direct-
ing a reconnoissance, encountered the National pickets near Latonia Springs, composed of a part
of company E, One Hundred and Sixth Ohio, commanded by Lieutenant Schleyer, who, after a
skirmish with the Rebels, fell back on the reserves. The Rebels also withdrew to their main body.

In this little affair it was discovered that the Austrian rifle, with which the regiment was
armed, was almost useless, only six out of eighteen guns proving serviceable. Before other arms
could be procured the regiment received orders to report to General Nelson, at Louisville, Ken-
tucky. At this place the regiment was shifted from one brigade to another, on account of the
unserviceable state of the guns; but finally marched with the Thirty-Ninth Brigade, Twelfth
Division, of the Thirty-Ninth Army Corps, and reached Frankfort, Kentucky, on the 9th day of
October. Through the intercession of General Dumont, commanding the division, the regiment
was furnished with the regular army musket.

The emergency under which the regiment was ordered to take the field, before the comple-
tion of its organization, having passed, it was expected that it would be permitted to fill up its
ranks to the legal maximum; but it was otherwise ordered, and the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio
remained in the field as a battalion. Under this order a commission as Lieutenant-Colonel was
issued to Colonel Tafel, with the promise that the regiment should be filled to its maximum at
the earliest possible day.

At this time General John Morgan was disturbing that part of Kentucky, and the regiment
participated in several expeditions against his forces. On the 24th of October it left Frankfort,
and arrived at Bowling Green on the 4th of November. Here the division came under the com-
mand of, and was reviewed by, General Rosecrans.

The Thirty-Ninth Brigade was detached from the division, and left Bowling Green Novem-
ber 10th for Glasgow, Kentucky. The Rebels were operating in that section. Captain Hamilton,
with eighty-six cavalry, attacked the National pickets on the Salina Road, composed of a detach-
ment of company C, of the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio. One of the National outposts was
killed, one wounded, and six taken prisoners. The reserve, of twenty men, came to the rescue,
and after a spirited fight repulsed the Rebels with some loss.

A day or two later another engagement was had with Scott's Rebel Cavalry. The Rebels



574 Ohio in the War.

had two pieces of artillery. The National mounted infantry advanced on a reconnoissance, and
after reconnoitering the enemy's position and firing a few rounds, succeeded in intimidating them
to such an extent as to compel their withdrawal from the field.

Hartsville, Kentucky, was the next point to which the regiment moved, reaching that place
on the 28th of November. On this m:irch the regiment had several skirmishes with the enemy
(Colonel Bennett's Rebel cavalry), and maile a number of captures.

Colonel Scott, who had been commanding the Thirty-Ninth Brigade (the one in which the
One Hundred and Sixtli was brigaded), was relieved at this point, and a much inferior officer,
Colonel A. Moore, of the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois In Ian try, appointed in his stead.
Under this last-named incompetent commander the disgraceful affair at Hartsville took place, on
Sunday, December 7, 18G2. The part taken in that disastrous affair by the One Hundred and
Sixtli Ohio is thus explained by Lieutenant-Colonel Tafel in his official report:

"We had not quite finished taking our position, forming the right of our line of battle, when
our right wing was attacked with impetuosity by the enemy's infantry, which, meantime, had
deployed in our front. This attack was preceded by the firing of their artillery, which, on
account of its bad aim, produced no effect whatever. The men behaved very well, and our line
advanced somewhat from our original position. One gun of the Thirteenth Indiana Battery now
arrived on the ground, and was posted in the middle of our line, and to the left of my com-
mand. Colonel Moore then ordered the whole line to fall back to the rear of the gun, and he expe-
rienced some difficulty in making my left to conform to this order. Meanwhile I noticed a fall-
ing back on my right, which, I found, was occasioned by a part of the One Hundred and
Eighth Regiment, in order to prevent a Hank movement by the enemy's dismounted cavalry, who
advanced on us through the woods. Thus the fight stood for some time, until our piece of artil-
lery, after achieving fine results and blowing up one of the enemy's caissons, was forced to retire
on account of its loss of men and horses, caused by its exposed position. The cannon was with-
drawn to the top of a rocky hill, in the rear of the several camps, and from whence the other
piece was playing across the river. Simultaneously Colonel Moore ordered the men to fall back
upon that hill ; the flanking movements of the enemy, however, compelled me to move the greater
part of my command along the edge of the woods on the right, where the enemy had long tried
to effect an opening. The train of the One Hundred and Eighth Regiment afforded me a fine
opportunity to check the enemy's advance on our right flank, and there they were punished
severely. When, however, the camps of the One Hundred and Eighth Ohio and One Hundred
and Fourth Illinois Regiments had fallen into the hands of the enemy my position became unten-
able, and I fell back with the men upon the ridge occupied by brigade head-quarters. At that
time Colonel Moore had already surrendered the battery and that part of the brigade that had
rallied on the hill b.ick of the camps. At this juncture men came riding up, wearing the blue
army overcoat, waving their hats, and telling the men to surrender like the rest; but I cried out
to the men not to listen, and that General Dumont was near with re-enforcements. The men
accordingly mado another stand, but were quickly surrounded by the then otherwise wholly dis-
engaged aggregate force of the enemy. A part only made their escape across the road, and saved
the regimental colors by tearing them off the staffs and hiding them on their persons. With one
solitary exception, all the officers performed their duty unflinchingly, and the men, also, with
very few exceptions, fought like veterans. Out of a force of about two hundred and fifty men, I
had twenty-two killed, forty-two wounded, and ten missing, among them six officers. The Sec-
ond (Rebel) Kentucky Infantry, with whom we had to contend, according to their own accounts,
show a loss of seventy-five killed and wounded."

One company of the regiment, absent as escort to the provision-train, at Gallatin, escaped
captivity. After five days' detention within the enemy's lines, during which they suffered greatly
from hunger and cold, the prisoners were paroled, at Murfreesboro', and sent over the lines to
General Rosecrans, at Nashville. General Rosecrans, after receiving a full report from Lieuten-
ant-Colonel Tafel of the Hartsville affair, expressed his entire satisfaction with the conduct of
the regiment and its commander on that occasion.

On the 12th day of January, 1863, the regiment was declared exchanged, and received march-



One Hundred and Sixth Ohio Infantry. 575

ing orders from the paroled camps at Columbus, Ohio. It was ordered to Camp Dennison to col-
lect the men, many of whom were absent on furlough, and to reorganize. On the 24th of March
the regiment left for Lexington, Kentucky, and reported to General Gillinore, who ordered it to
proceed to Frankfort, Kentucky, and relieve the One Hundred and Third Ohio.

Owen County was infested with numerous guerrilla bands. Lieutenant-Colonel Tafel deter-
mined, if possible, to put a stop to their depredations, and for that purpose organized expeditions
against them, compelling the Rebel sympathizers around Frankfort to furnish the needed horses.
Several desperate characters, who had long been the terror of the county, were captured and
their bands dispersed and driven off. While at Frankfort the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio won
praise from the citizens and State authorities, for the good conduct and soldierly bearing of both
officers and men.

Receiving orders for Nashville, the regiment arrived at that city on the 4th day of May,
18G3, and went into camp at Fort Morton. Alter remaining in this camp four weeks, the regi-
ment was ordered to report to General Payne, at Gallatin, Tennessee, and by him ordered to
guard the Louisville and Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the borders of Kentucky. This
duty was thoroughly performed. The men of the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio fought the bush-
whackers in their own way. "Still-hunting" was resorted to with success, until the wary ras-
cals found that they were beaten at their own game, and left in disgust.

On one occasion only did the guerrillas get the better of the National men. On June 28,
1S63, word was sent to head-quarters that a Union citizen, residing two miles from Bank Lodge,
where the regimental head-quarters were, was being robbed by guerrillas. A mounted squad of
a dozen men was dispatched after them, who followed the trail of the robbers all night, but finally
lost it. On returning to camp the following day this squad was bushwhacked near Butler's
Mills, and the Lieutenant in command (Lieutenant Bertgold) and one soldier killed and three
wounded.

So galling did the vigorous rule of the One Hundred and Sixth become to the guerrillas that
their leader, Captain Harper, offered a reward for the head of its commander. On several occa-
sions Harper was so closely pressed that he was compelled to abandon his horse and take to the
woods. On the 4th of December, 18G3, a portion of the regiment, returning from a three-days'
scout, came up with Harper's gang at Dry Fork, Sumner County, Tennessee, and though Harper
himself escaped, the no less notorious Bill Berry man was killed. More than one hundred horses,
besides other property, were captured from the guerrillas and turned over to the Quartermaster
at Gallatin.

On the 4th of May, 1864, the regiment marched to Bridgeport, Alabama, and formed part
of the garrison. Here the trained scouts were very effective among the Raccoon Mountains,
where they had numerous encounters with the guerrillas of that region. On the 10th of June
Lieutenant. Luster's scouting party was ambushed, at Cane Creek, by Captain Caperton's guerrilla
band. Two of the National scouts were badly wounded and three of the guerrillas, including
Caperton, killed.

It was not until October, 1864, that the regiment was recruited to its maximum strength,
although, if time had been afforded, it would have been completed in a few weeks from its
entrance into the field. Two companies of maximum strength, under Captains Ruh and Bau-
man respectively, joined the regiment, thus completing its organization.

During the impetuous raid of General Hood the One Hundred and Sixth held on to its posts
along the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, although for four weeks completely cut off from
all communication with the main army at Nashville. In January, 1865, the regiment performed
good service in preventing the Rebel forces under General Lyons from crossing the Tennessee
River at Mud Creek.

The One Hundred and Sixth Ohio remained in camp at Stevenson, Alabama, performing val-
uable service, until June, 1S65, when it was ordered up to Nashville for muster out, which event
was consummated on the 29th of June, 1865, and the men were sent to their homes in Ohio.



576



Ohio in the War.



107th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THHEE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do ,

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



DATE OF RANK



SERAPHIM MEYER

Charles Mueller

John S. Cooper

George Arnold

August Vignos

Edward S. Meyer

If. C. SUHNER

C. A. Haktman

Hubert Shopp

John Knaus

Andrew Wannewetch

John Knaus

II. NlEDERMEYEH

Franz Schiki

Charles Behlen

Rorert F. Kabus

IVtrr Bi«terh.en

August DewaMt

Gustave Bucking

Bernard F. Steiuer

John Schriuk

Lewis Trail b

Anthony Petersen m

August Vignos

Richard Ferederle

Martin Viehack

Edward S. Meyer

Samuel Surburg

Jacob Hose

Otto Weber

Win. Koch

Otto Weber

John M. Lutz

Wui. Speyer

Philip Setzler

Will. ] I :l I'll lull

Win. Fisher

Peter F. Young

Jacob Lichty

F. C. Suhner

George Billow

Philip Wang

Burkhart Geiitner ,

Samuel Miller

John C. Brinker ,

Anton Millert

Joseph Biaun

Daniel Unibstradter

Jacob Iiose

John J. Sebastian ,

George Schanibs

Samuel Surburg

Otto Weber

Win. Koch

John Plan

John Sinning

Hamilton Starkweather...

Win. Speyer

John M. Lutz

John G. Winkler

I'homas V. Morskey

John H. Piers.

James E. Donner

Wm. T. Uechtel

John M. Knautl'

Philip Setzler

Wm. Harmon

Wni. Fisher

Peter F. Young

Christian Scunner

Owen F. Browning

Jacob Lichty

F. C. Suhner

John Fischner

George Billow

Philip Wang

llurkhart Gentner

Samuel Miller

John C. Brinker

A. G. Petersen

Anton Millert

Joseph Braun

Harrison Flora

John J. Houck ,

Fustus Schoniberg



Sept.
\ug.
(Tot.

Sept.

Aug.

Nov.

March

Aug.

lune

March

Sept.

Dec.

April

March

Sept.

Nov.

July

Aug.



Sept.



Nov.

Dec.

Nov.

Feb.

April

March

May

Dec.



Aug.
Nov.



Aug.
July



Au a



Oct.

Nov.
Dec.

Nov.



Dec.

Feb.

March

Feb.

March

April

May

Dec.



Jan.
Aug.



IB,

22,
1",

6.
21.

3,
is,
20,

y,

9,

4,
17,
16,
31, 1

V, 1
89,
23,
2*.

1,

1,
18,
18,

6,

6,

ft,

6,
II,
14,

1,
20,
23, I

24,
13,

1,

1,

1,
1,

11.
II,

3,

3,

s,

3,
18,

is,
1.
30,

3il,
28,
3il,
22,
18,
3,
5,

isj

II,

ta\

i,

14,
SO,
1,
16,

12,
1,
6,

22,

24,

24,

1?,
1,
1,
1,
I,
1

IS

11

11

11

II

II

11



Sept.

Nov.
Sept.
Nov.

March

Sept.

June

March

Sept.

Dec.

April

March

Sept.

April

Sept.



1m',.'



COM. ISSUED.



April



May
Jan.



Aug.

Nov.



March
Sept.



, 1864



Oct.
Dec.



Jan.
April



May
Jan.



Aug.



20,

2",
17,
2",
27,

18,

ill.
10,

y,

2H,
17,
M,

31, 1
2", 1
22, I
21), 1
2",
2",
20,
2",
39,
20,
2u,
20,
20,
12,
12,
12,
12,
22, 1
*,
22,
M,
2>;, l

2*.
2>>,
38,

I'.
U.

3,

3,

3,

3,

3,
18,1
18,

2o, :

2H,
20,
20,
2ii,
20,
20,
2ii,
20,
2i I,
20,
13,
12,
12,
12,
12,
12,
20,
20,
15,
22,
22,
22,
22,



Resigned February 8, 1864 ; disability.

Resigned October 24, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned August 21, 1863.

Itesigned September 30, 1864.

Resigned January 1, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed at Fredericksburg.

Honorably discharged November 7, 1863

Mustered out with regiment.

Itesigned February 22, 1863.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Resigned.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Itesigned November 30, 1862.

Mastered out with regiment.

Resigned December 1. 1863.

Promoted; resigned March 28, 1864.

K<sign<d November 11, 1863.

Diedof wounds August 13. 1863.

Itesigned November 3o, 1862.

Resigned February 23. ISiVS.

Honorably discharged November 7, 1S63.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned.

Resigned November 14, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Discharged December 16, 1863.

Resigned March 24, 1863.

Resigned March 5, 1863.

Kesigned June 4, 1863.

MugU-red out with regiment.

Resigned August 20, 1864.

Resigned September 30, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged as 1st Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged December 11, 1864.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment

Mustered out with regiment

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

R. Q. M. ; resigned April 24, 1863 j disability.

Promoted to Captain December 1, 1862.

Itesigned March 6, 1863.

Died October 27, 1862.

Piomoted to Captain November 1, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 25, 1862.

Honorably discharged December 10, 1862.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died June, 1863.

Resigned February 1, 1863.

Resigned.

Mustered out December 12, 1862.

Revoked.

Itesigned July 26, 1*62.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 10. 1863.

Resigned.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged June 1, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



One Hundred and Seventh Ohio Infantry. 577



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



John Stultz

Philip P. Grosehart..,

Valentine Bickel

Win. H. Steiner ,

Gerhard H. Albers....

Conrad Deubel

Wm. H. Bowers

Baruet F. Thomas....

John H. Piers

John Mohr

JohnG. Winkler

James E. Donner

John 51. Lutz

Wm. Fisher

Thos. F. Morskey

Philip Setzler

Wm. F. Bechtel

Wm. Martin

John Peterssenn

Owen F. Browning ...
Christian Sciiriner....

Peter F. Young

John Fischner

George Billow

Tames C. Erl

Philip Wang

A. G. Petterson

Barkharr Gentner

lacob Lichty

Fernando C. Suhner..

Samuel Miller

John C. Briuker



Aug. 11,

Nov. 3.

3,

3,

i! 3,

March 18,'

June 16,
Aug. 12,
July 25,
31,
Aug. 1,
July 28,
Aug. IB,
" <S

Sept. 6,
Julv 28,



Dec. 1,

10.

March 11, 1

6,
Feb. 23,
March 24,

May 13,

Oct. 16,



Aug.
Nov.



March Is,
June 16,
Sept. 20,
20,
20,
20,



Oct.
Dec.



June
April



May
Dec.



26,
20,
22,
22,



.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment at Sergt. Major.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned December 16, 1.S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted ; mustered out D-eernber 12, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned December. 8, 1862.

Died in 1862.

Resigned March 11, 1S63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned May, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



107th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was composed almost wholly of Germans. It was organized August 25,
1862, at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland. It lay in camp at this place, drilling and
preparing for the field, until the latter part of September, when it moved under orders,
to Covington, Kentucky, opposite Cincinnati. This move was made with reference to an antici-
pated attack on Cincinnati by a Eebel force under General Kirby Smith, then operating within
a few miles of Covington.

The regiment lay at Covington about one week, when it returned to Delaware, Ohio, but
was shortly thereafter taken by rail to "Washington, where it was engaged for nearly a month
constructing breastworks and fortifications around and in the vicinity of the city.

In the early part of November the regiment marched to Fairfax C. H., Virginia, where it
remained two weeks. Stafford C. H. was its next stopping-place. At this point it was assigned
to the Second Brigade, First Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Major-General Sigel commanding.
Remaining at Stafford C. H. only two weeks, it marched on a flanking expedition to the left and
rear of Fredericksburg, with the purpose of co-operating with General Burnside's army in a sec-
ond attack. This plan Avas frustrated by the wretched condition of the roads, and the whole
army fell back to and around Brooks's Station, where it went into winter-quarters.

On April 29, 1863, the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio, with its brigade and division,
moved across the Bappahannock to Chancellorsville, .where, on the 2d and 3d of May, it took
part in the battle of that name. The regiment was under the command of Colonel Meyer, and
went into the engagement with the Eleventh Army Corps, under General Howard. The Elev-
enth Corps was completely flanked by Stonewall Jackson, and its lines were broken. In this
disastrous affair the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio suffered terribly, losing two hundred and
twenty officers and men, killed, wounded, and prisoners. The Surgeon of the regiment, Dr.
Hartman, of Cleveland, Ohio, and several other officers, were killed.

On May 6th the regiment returned to its former camp at Brooks's Station, where it remained
Vol. II.— 37.



578 Ohio in the War.

until June 12th. It then marched to Catlett's Station, Manassas Junction, and Centerville, on
its way to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the Rebel army under General Lee having invaded that
State. Passing through Frederick City and Emmettsburg, it reached Gettysburg on the morning
of the 1st of July. It was at once engaged with the enemy, taking position on the right wing.
In the first day's fight the regiment and Eleventh Corps were compelled to fall back through the
town of Gettysburg to Cemetery Hill, where a new line was formed and held during the
remainder of tbe battle. In falling back to this place tbe regiment lost in killed, wounded, and
prisoners, two hundred and fifty officers and men. In the second day's fight, in a charge made
about five o'clock in the afternoon, it again lost heavily in killed and wounded. In this affair the
regiment captured a Rebel flag from the Eighth Louisiana Tigers. Aside from slight skirmish-
ing, it was not engaged in the third day's fight. Its total loss in the battle of Gettysburg — killed,
wounded, and prisoners — was over four hundred out of about five hundred and fifty, rank and
file, with which it entered.

A number of officers of the regiment were killed. Lieutenant-Colonel Mueller was
wounded in the arm; Captain Vignos, of company H, had his right arm shot off; Captain
6teiner, of company D, was shot through the bowels, from the effects of which he subsequently
died; Captain Speyer, of company I, was shot through the right shoulder; Captain Fisher, of
company F, was shot through the breast and arm; Adjutant Young, who captured the Rebel



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