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flag, was also severely wounded; Lieutenant John Fischner, of company G, was shot through the
thigh. A number of other officers were wounded, whose names can not be procured.

With one hundred and eleven guns, all that was left of the regiment, it joined in the pur-
suit of the Rebel army, following it to Hagerstown, and thence into Virginia, to Catlett's Station.

On August 1st the regiment sailed in transports to Folly Island, South Carolina, where it
performed picket-duty until January, 1867. In that month it was taken in boats to Kiowah
Island, and from there waded over to Seabrook Island, and drove the enemy from that point.
It returned to Folly Island, and remained there until the 7th of February, when it made a sim-
ilar expedition across Seabrook Island to Jones's Island. This last movement was made to
cover the operations of General Gillmore at Olustee, Florida.

On February 11th the regiment again returned to Folly Island, and on the 23d of the same
month was taken on transports to Jacksonville, Florida. At this place it had a few skirmishes
with the enemy, aside from which nothing of moment occurred. In July it was taken to Fer-
nandino', when, after remaining about one month, it returned to Jacksonville.

On December 29th, the regiment was taken on transports to Devos Neck, South Carolina.
While here it had several skirmishes with the enemy, and lost five men killed and some fifteen
wounded. From this point it marched to Pocotaligo Station, on the Savannah and Charleston
Railroad; thence to Gardner's Corners, where, for some seven days, it did picket-duty. It then
marched through (with some days' detention in building bridges, roads, etc.) to Charleston,
South Carolina. Stopping at Charleston one day, it joined an expedition, under command of
General Potter, for the purpose of ridding the vicinity of Rebel bands of guerrillas. Returning
to Charleston it was placed on a gunboat and taken to Georgetown, South Carolina. It there
did picket-duty until the 23d of March; then marched to Sumterville, met the enemy, defeated
him, and captured three pieces of artillery, six horses, and fifteen prisoners. In this affair the
regiment lost four men wounded. Marching to Singleton Plantation, it met and skirmished
with the enemy, losing two men wounded. A few days later, near the same place, it captured a
train of cars, which was destroyed, with thirteen locomotives and a large amount of provisions
and ammunition.

On April 16, 1865, news was received of the surrender of Lee's and Johnston's armies ; and,
amid great rejoicings over the auspicious event, the regiment marched back to Georgetown,
South Carolina. Three weeks thereafter it was taken by steamer to Charleston, where it did
provost-duty until July 10th, when it was mustered out of the service and sent home to Cleve-
land, where it was paid off and discharged.



One Hundked and Eighth Ohio Infantry.



579



108th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Ass't burgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

I/O.

Do.
Chaplain....
Captain ...
Do. ....



DATE OF RANK.






Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do. •

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do.
1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



GEORGE T. LIMBERG....Nov.

JOaEi'H GOOD May

Geoj.ue T. Limiu );.. Aug.

Carlo Piepho jFeb.

Joseph Good March

Frederick Beck, jr May

Frederick W. Ei.breg Aug.

'Jacob A. Eglev i.lan.

Joseph Cuud t.luly

Frederick Beck, jit 'March

OlIARI.E-l LaUENSTEIN I May

A. ZlPPERI.IN Aug.

T. C. Hetti.ich :Sept.

Hubert Siiopp !Dec.



COM. ISSUED.



19,



1863 March
1865 May
1862 Oct.

" I March

1864 "

1 865; May
1862jOct.
1863j March
Aug.
March
May
Oct.



He.\rv Ui.rich

J. S. Feruu o.\

J. C. Miers

Lucius Mills

Ado.pii Matzdoiife ,

iiOLERT K.OEH..ER ,

Carlo Piepho ,

Joseph Good ,

Wm. Ki tteler

F. E. liunibach

Joiui U. Kreidler

Win. Kottier

Philip Lautenschiager

Carl Von Heintze

Kuuolph Hcintze

Charles T. Hoaner

Frederick Beck, jr

.lacob Dewald

Michael strohinyer

George Klein

Daniel Gusswiler

Charles L.iueustein

Lewis ilebel

Christian Dilg

W in. Doeger

David 1 reidiuan

Joseph Nessler

Janus 11. Orr

Michael A. McGuire

Hugo Elzner

Wm. Guetimer

Frantz Fleischman

Philip Schmidt

Henry Schinetz^r

enry Urban

Gustavu Bauer

Jacob Dewald

Klein

Daniel Gusswiler

Frederick Beck, jr

J. Lewis Silbcrhcrn

Michael Strohmyer

Charles Lauenstein

Frederick W. Von Strantz.

Conrad Kress

Christian Dilg

Wm. Doeger

Lewis Hebel

Henry Hulin

David Treidmau

loseph Nessler

James H. Urr

Hugo Elzner

Michael A. McGuire

Herman Backhaus

Edmond llodde

Wm. Guenthner

John Brack

Frantz Fleischman

Titus Hyer

Philip Schmidt

Henry Schwartz

Henry Schmetzer

Louis 1 ic Jin aim

John Pausch

Jacob Meyer, jr

Henry Urban

Henry Heiniuiller

Christopher Schumm

Philip Okele

George Kuutz



Jan.



1864
1865
1862
1863
1864
1865
1862
1863

1864
I86S
1862



July


30,


1863lJuly


20


Aug.


4,


"


Aug.


4,


Sept.


26,


1864


Sept.


26,


Dec.


7,


"


Dec.


7,


May


13,


1865


May


13,


June


H,


1,-61


June


w,


July


30,
30,
30,


1862


Oct.


2S,
28,
28,


Aug.


11,
11,
13,
13,


"


;;


28,
28,

2S,
28,


Dec.


19,


"


Dec.


lit,


"


30,


1863


March


**>


M


Id.


'*


**


8,


Jan.


13,


"


April


13,


Feb.


6,
8,


M


,.


13,
13,


March


2,


"


11


13


Feb.


24.
3,


..


..


13,

13,


luly


31,


n


"


25,


March


31,
31.

31,

31,


1-61


March


31,
31,
»,
31


April


19,


"


April


19,


M ay


25,


"


May


25,


Aug.


W,


"


Aug.


l»i


Nov.


3,


**


Nov.


3,


Jan.


20,

20,


1865


Jan.


20,


May


2,
18,


H


May


2,
IS,


July


30,
30,
30,

to,


1862


Oct.


28,

28,
28,
28,


Aug.


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Hi
15,

1,


J!


Dec.


28,
28,
28,
31,


Dec.


30,
3ft


1863


March


8,

8,


July


30,


1862


Oct.


28,


Jan.


15,
15,


1863


April


13,

13,


Aug.


25,


1862


Oct.


as,


Feb.


8,
24,


1863


April


13,
13.


Jan.


30,


44


kt


13


March


2,


"


"


13,


Feb.


6,

8,
3,


,,





13,
13,

13,


March


31,


1864


March


31,


July


31,


1863


Aug.


25,


March


31,
31,
31,


1*64


March


31,
31,
31


April


19,

19,


•1


April


19,


Aug.


19,
19,


.>


Aug.


It,
19,


Sept.


26,

2' ; ,


■■


Sept.


26,
26,


Oct.


12,


11


Oct.


12,


Nov.


3,


"


Nov.


3,


Jan.


20,

20,


1865


Jan.


20,
20,



2, 1863



18j5
18454

1862



1862
1863



1862

1863



1864
lei- 3

1864



Honorably discharged May 16, 1864.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned March 13, 1864.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Major.

Resigned January 15, lt63.

Resigned July 31, 1S63.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged December 9. 1862.

Mustered out for promotion June 20, 1863.

Resigned July 27, 1864.

Declined.

Resigned April 20, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned March 2, 1863.

Resigned February 6, 1863.

Resigned February 10, 1864.

Resigned January 30, 1S63.

Resigned February 8, 1S63.

Resigned February 24, la63.

Mustered out July 3, 1865, G. 0. 26.

Mustered out July 3, 1865, G. O. 26.

Promoted to Major.

Killed May 14, la64.

Resigned September 1, 1864.

Resigned November 10, 1864.

Resigned January 13, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned March 13, 1864.

Declined.

Resigned as 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out June 19, l66o>.

Mustered out June 19, 1865.

Mustered out June ly, 1865.

Resigned November 16, 1664.

Killed in action.

Commission returned.

Killed April 10, 1S65.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Resigned January 18, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 8, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged June 19, 1865.

Resigned August 27, 1864.

Resigned November 4, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned January 15, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant May 8, 1863.

Resigned October 2, ls63.

Mustered out.

Resigned March 8, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned September 22, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out May 15, 1S65.

Revoked.

Mustered out.

Declined ; commission returned.



580



Ohio in the War



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM.


SSUED.


REMARKS.




ist Lieutenant
Do.
Do.


Benjamin Parmeleo

Frederick Posclmer


Jan.
May

July
Aug.

Dec.

Feb.
July


20, 18<i5
2, "
2, "

18, "

18, "
30, 1862

30, "
1, "
6, "

11, "
13, "

19, "

1, "
10. 1S63

2, 1864
16, "
27, "

18, "
6, "

19, "
8, "

3, "

31, "


Jan.
May

Oct.

Dec.

March

April
Aug.


20, 1865
2, "

l.S "
18, "
28, 1S62

28* "
28, "
28, "
28, "
28, "
31, "
8, 1864
8, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
23, "


Mustered out July 3, 1865, G. O. 26.

Mustered out July 3, 1865, G. O. 26.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned May 8, 1863.

Resigned February 19, 1865.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 16, 1863.

Resigned January 27, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned March 11, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned November 5, 1864.

Resigned October 19, 186-1.

Commission returned ; refused to muster.




Do.


lacob Pfeitfi'i-




Do.






2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


Max Hosier

Edmoncl Rodde

Henry Schwartz

James Krcidler




Do.






Do.


Titus Hyer




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.













108th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS was a German organization, recruited under the call of 1862, in the counties of
Hamilton, Butler, and Franklin. It had partially completed its organization at Camp
Dennison in August, 1862, when, in consequence of the alarm created by the Kirby
Smith raid, it was hurried over the river to Covington, Kentucky. While at that place four
companies were added to the regiment, making eight companies in all, numbering about six
hundred men.

After the retreat of Kirby Smith the regiment was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, and from
thence marched via Shelbyville to Frankfort, Kentucky, that section being disturbed by John
Morgan's Rebel guerrillas. While at Frankfort it made a night march, the object of which was
to capture John Morgan and his followers, then encamped near Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. The
enterprise did not succeed, because of the failure of another National regiment to reach Law-
renceburg before Morgan could pass that village. Returning to Frankfort the regiment went
into camp for a few days, and was then placed in General Dumont's division, and marched
therewith to Bowling Green via Bardstown, reaching that place in ten days from the time it
started from Frankfort.

At Bowling Green the One Hundred and Eighth was re-brigaded, forming, with the One
Hundred and Sixth (German) Ohio, and One Hundred and Fourth Illinois, the Thirty-Ninth
Brigade, Twelfth Division, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, of the Nineteenth Illi-
nois. After being reviewed by General Rosecrans the brigade was ordered to Glasgow, and from
thence to Tomkinsville, where it remained but a few days. While waiting for its provision
train, momentarily expected to arrive from Cave City, the Rebels, under Generals Morgan, Ham-
ilton, and Bennett, with artillery, and a greatly superior force, surrounded the command, but
through the skillful leadership of Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, and the aid of some loyal Kentuckians,
it was successfully led into Hartsville without the loss of a man or wagon. This perilous march
was made in a dark night, through by-roads known only to the loyal guide, and through the forces
of the enemy, who occupied all the roads leading to Tompkinsville. Hartsville, Tennessee, was its
next camping-ground, near which place the regiment met witli a terrible disaster. Here Lieuten-
ent-Colonel Scott was ordered to join his own regiment, and Colonel Moore, of the One Hundred



One Hundred and Eighth Ohio Infantry. 581

and Fourth Illinois, took command. This change of commanders proved fatal to the regiment
and the brigade. In spite of several warnings that General Morgan was meditating an attack on
the 7th of December, Colonel Moore took no precautions whatever. The night before the attack
a negro swam the Cumberland and informed Colonel Moore of Morgan's design, but that officer
neglected to ascertain the truth of the statement or strengthen the picket-line.

At daybreak the camp was aroused by the approach of the Rebels in line of battle. The
National pickets were captured without firing a gun. The enemy's shells soon began to drop into
the camp. All was at once in the utmost confusion. Colonel Moore, utterly demoralized, failed
to give his regimental officers the proper commands, and in consequence each officer did the very
best he could with his own regiment. Captain Carlo Piepho was in command of the One Hun-
dred and Eighth, and fought the Rebels resolutely for over an hour, in which time the regiment
had forty-six killed and one hundred and sixty-two wounded, many of whom were hit by several
bullets. Several officers were among the killed on the National side. The Rebel loss was four
officers and seventy-four men. All the officers of the One Hundred and Eighth were captured
except three. The National force in this affair was thirteen hundred infantry, a section of Cap-
tain Nicklin's battery, and a mounted squad of the Tenth Indiana Cavalry. The Rebels were
reported to have had seven thousand infantry and ten guns. Notwithstanding this greatly supe-
rior force, it has since been understood that Morgan was on the point of retreating when Colonel
Moore foolishly displayed his white handkerchief in token of surrender. This disaster was a
source of much chagrin to the officers and men of the One Hundred and Eighth. A source of
much comfort was found in a letter from General Rosecrans, addressed to Captain Piepho, who
commanded the regiment, dated at Murfreesboro', February 16, 1863, in which he said: "The
conduct of the One Hundred and Eighth was proper and commendable." To have been in the
"Hartsville affair," however, was long felt to be an unpleasant feature of a military record.

In due time the regiment was exchanged and ordered to assemble at Camp Dennison, Ohio.
Under its new organization another company was added, and it took the field again at Frankfort,
Kentucky. The regiment remained at this place for several weeks, and won golden opinions
from the citizens and State authorities for its discipline and general conduct. At the solicitation
of Governor Robinson and the citizens of Frankfort the order for its removal was twice revoked.

From Frankfort the regiment was ordered to Louisville; thence to Nashville, at which latter
place it acted as a portion of the Reserve Corps, charged with the duty of guarding the railroad
to Chattanooga, devoting four months to that arduous and monotonous service.

On the 6th of September the regiment went by rail to Stevenson, Alabama; thence, after a
short stay, it marched to Battle Creek, thence to Anderson's Cross Roads, marching over roads
made nearly impassable by the constant rains of that season. For two weeks it was engaged in
repairing the road leading to Waldron's Ridge, which was finally crossed in November, and the
regiment marched to Dallas, some fifteen miles above Chattanooga, and thence, after a stay of
only one night, to Chattanooga. The camp of the regiment was placed on the extreme verge of
Moccasin Point, at the foot of Lookout Mountain, as support to the Eighteenth Ohio Battery,
which occasionally threw shells into the Rebel camp on the mountain. Although under fire of
the Rebel guns on the mountain for ten days not a man or beast was struck. While at Chatta-
nooga the One Hundred and Eighth was rebrigaded and made part of the Second Brigade,
Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Brigadier-General John Beatty commanding the
brigade, and General Jeff. C. Davis the division.

On the morning of the 22d of November, with two days' cooked rations in their haversacks,
the regiment crossed the Tennessee River, opposite the last spur of Mission Ridge. It crossed
the Chickamauga the following night, and in the afternoon came on the Rebels as they were leav-
ing Chickamauga Station. The Rebels did not stand a moment, but fled in such haste as to leave
their dinners in the process of cooking, which the tired and hungry Germans of the One Hun-
dred and Eighth devoured with much comfort. Following the Rebels in the direction of Grays-
ville, the regiment was soon admonished by hostile shots that the enemy was disposed to dispute
its further advance. A line of battle was soon formed, and a lively little engagement entered



582 Ohio in the War.

into, which resulted in a renewal of the Rebel retreat. A few men wounded, including an
officer, were the only casualties of this affair.

The next day the line of march was taken up, and with rapid marches averaging twenty-
five miles a day, the regiment was hurried toward Knoxville, then heavily pressed by the Rebel
General Longstreet. On reaching the banks of the Little Tennessee, at Morgantown, orders were
met to retrace its steps to Chattanooga, which was reached in due time. Four full weeks had
been consumed in almost constant marching. For ten or twelve days many of the men were
compelled to march barefooted over frozen ground, no extra shoes being on hand.

On the 27th of December the regiment went into winter-quarters near Rossville, Georgia.
In February, 1864, the camp was moved to Lyne's Station, on the Knoxville Railroad. From this
point the regiment took part in the reconnoissance from Ringgold to Tunnel Hill and toward
Dalton. After this affair the regiment marched back to its old camp at Rossville, and was there
joined by two new companies, recruited by Colonel Limberg, now reinstated to the command
of the regiment.

On the 3d of May the One Hundred and Eighth took up its line of march for Ringgold,
having sent all its superfluous baggage to Bridgeport. The Rebels had been driven from Tunnel
Hill, and had retreated on Rocky Face Ridge and Buzzard's Roost. Now commenced the
Atlanta campaign — one almost continuous scene of marching and fighting for four months.
Under the command of Brigadier-General John G. Mitchell the One Hundred and Eighth par-
ticipated in a series of successful bayonet-charges, driving the Rebels from strong positions. At
Resaca, for four hours, the regiment stood firm amid a perfect hail-storm of bullets, and lost
many of its brave men. On this bloody field it more than redeemed the unfortunate aflair at
Hartsville; and its commander, Colonel Limberg, attracted particular attention by his cool cour-
age. At Rome, Georgia, another determined resistance by the Rebels was met and overcome, and
the enemy driven out of the place. The town was found to be completely sacked, and nothing
left but a lot of fine smoking and chewing tobacco, on which the boys of the One Hundred and
Eighth feasted to their hearts' content. At Acworth, at Big Shanty, at Kenesaw, and at all the
memorable places of that march the regiment was in its proper place, battling for the right.

The Rebel army had changed commanders, and with its new leader, General Hood, had
commenced its desperate attack on Sherman's rear, tearing up the Chattanooga Railroad, attack-
ing supply-trains, etc. To checkmate this, and save the communications of the National army,
a heavy force was needed as train-guards, scouts, etc. The One Hundred and Eighth Ohio was
designated as one of the regiments to be sent back and used for this severe and arduous duty.
Hardly a train passed between Marietta and Atlanta without an accident, or an attack by guer-
rillas and Rebel cavalry. A train thrown off the track was defended during one whole day, and
the enemy beaten off, by a sergeant and twenty men of the regiment. During four months only
one train was captured, in a night attack near Big Shanty.

In August, 1864, a few companies of the regiment, then accidentally in Chattanooga, partici-
pated in the engagement in front of Dalton, with the Rebel General Wheeler's forces, then
besieging that place. A charge was ordered and executed by the One Hundred and Eighth,
under Lieutenant-Colonel Good, with such effect as to compel the Rebels to abandon the siege.

The summer passed away without further notable action on the part of the regiment, although
it was constantly engaged in arduous and responsible duty. In November, about the 9th or 10th
of the month, the One Hundred and Eighth broke camp at Dalton, and, under orders, hastened
to Atlanta to join the "march to the sea."

In the subsequent campaign of the Carolinas, at Bentonville, the One Hundred and Eighth,
acting with the Second Division of the Fourteenth Corps, saved the day by a heroic resistance, the
fact of which is proudly inscribed on the banner of the regiment. Six different attacks by the
Rebels were repulsed, although the men were compelled to jump over hastily-constructed breast-
works four times to meet attacks from rear and front. After the last and sixth attack was
repulsed there were only two cartridges per man left, and perhaps the menacing glitter of the
National bayonets, which the men had already fixed for a charge, deterred the Rebels from



One Hundred and Ninth Ohio Infantry. 583

another attack, in which, by reason of their greatly superior force, they would ' most probably
have been successful. It is but fair to mention that Major F. Beck commanded the regiment in
this affair, Colonel Limberg being again absent at home. Lieutenant-Colonel Good returning
from a leave of absence rejoined the command at Goldsboro'.

In the advance from Goldsboro', North Carolina, on the 10th of April, toward Smithfield, on
the Neuse River, the One Hundred and Eighth formed the advance of the National forces, and
was soon engaged with the Rebel cavalry. Every attempt of the Rebels to check the advance
was frustrated by the impetuosity with which the men of the One Hundred and Eighth attacked
them. The Rebels were driven fourteen miles from six o'clock A. M. until three P. M. In this
engagement Captain Fleischman, of company H, was killed, and it is claimed, that as this was the
last engagement of the war, that Captain Fleischman was the last National officer killed, and that
the One Hundred and Eighth fired the last shot at the rebellion.

At Smithfield the news of Lee's surrender electrified the whole army, and on the next day
Raleigh, North Carolina, was entered in triumph. In two days more Cape Fear River was
reached, and the National army sat down on its banks, ready to cross it if the Rebel army under
General Joe Johnston chose to prolong the contest.

At Holly Springs, North Carolina, the regiment tarried for a short breathing-spell, and then
pushed on toward Washington City, not this time for the purpose of "saving the Capital," but to
pass in review before President Johnson and the high authorities of the Nation. The march
from Raleigh to Richmond, Virginia, one hundred and ninety. two miles, was made in six days
and a half, without leaving a straggler in the rear. The march from Richmond to Washington
was made with more leisure. Arrived at its destination the regiment encamped near Alexandria.
After passing the grand review it was mustered out of the service, at Washington, on the 9th of



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