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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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command of the brigade. The regiment was engaged frequently in scouting and skirmishing.
On the 14th of June companies A and I came in from Bunker Hill, where they had participated
in an engagement and lost about half their number in killed and captured. The remainder made
their escape with great difficulty. The regiment withdrew with the army from Winchester on
the 4th of July; marched through Mercersburg and Loudon, Pennsylvania, and arrived at
Hagerstown, Maryland, in time to meet the army under General Meade. The regiment did not
unite with the army, but moved to Sharpsburg, and thence to Martinsburg, arriving August 4th.

On the 29th of April, 1S64, the regiment started up the Shenandoah Valley under General
Sigel. It marched by way of Woodstock, Harrisonburg, Cross Keys, and Port Republic, and
found the enemy well posted at Piedmont, near Staunton. It charged the enemy's works and
reached the fortifications, but was compelled to retire. It withdrew a short distance and laid
down until another charge was ordered, and this time the Rebels were driven from their works.
The One Hundred and Sixteenth lost one hundred and seventy-six men killed and wounded.
The troops entered Staunton, and after destroying all the Rebel property moved on toward Lex-
ington. The regiment, however, was ordered back to Staunton, to bring up a supply-train. It
marched day and night for several days, and rejoined the command at Lexington. On the 14th
of June the troops again advanced, passing through the Blue Ridge and Bedford Valleys, and
on the 17th met the enemy four miles from Lynchburg. During the morning of the next day
there was considerable skirmishing. In the afternoon the Rebels advanced upon the National
lines. Supported by the Fifth Virginia, the regiment was ordered to charge, and the Rebels were
driven into their works. It was now forced to fall back across an open field, and in this move-
ment lost many men killed and wounded. As soon as it was dark the National troops began to
retire. From the 18th to the 22d the regiment marched day and night, with scarcely any rations
and through dust shoe-mouth deep. On the 27th a small amount of supplies was received, and
the next day an abundance. The march was continued until the 29th, halting at Gauley Ford.

On the 2d of July the regiment marched down the valley to Camp Piatt, and there embarked
on steamer for Parkersburg, where it took cars and proceeded eastward. Upon reaching Cherry
Run, fifteen miles west of Martinsburg, the railroad was found to be destroyed, and the regiment
marched to Harper's Ferry and crossed to Sandy Hook, arriving on the 14th. It was ordered
into Loudon County, Virginia, to assist in driving Early from the valley. On the 11th of Jul)
the enemy was met at Snicker's Gap. At the opening of the fight the One Hundred and Six
teenth was on the extreme left, but it was sent in haste to strengthen the right of the line. A*
soon as it arrived several companies on the right were ordered to charge, and the enemy wa»
driven from the flank. The regiment fought with courage, and the enemy was effectually pre-
vented from regaining his position. The Rebels were held in check until dark, when the Ono
Hundred and Sixteenth recrossed the river and marched to Winchester. From here it fell back
through Martinsburg and Hagerstown to Maryland Heights, where it arrived on the 29th,
entirely exhausted.



One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Infantry. 607

The regiment moved to Halltown, then to Frederick, then back again across the river, and
up the valley. On the 12th of August the command reached Cedar Creek, and found the enemy
fortified on Fisher's Hill. In order to prevent the enemy from gaining the rear the troops fell
back to Charlestown, and from there to Halltown, v/here the line was re-formed and fortifications
were built. In a reconnoissance on the 26th a fight took place and the One Hundred and Six-
teenth, having the advance, lost heavily. On the 3d day of September Sheridan's entire force
advanced. The enemy was met at Berryville. The One Hundred and Sixteenth was engaged,
but with slight loss. On the 19th of September the regiment participated in the battle of Ope-
quan. It was scarcely formed when the order came to charge. The entire line of battle, with
the One Hundred and Sixteenth on the left, moved forward, and everything in front gave way.
A portion of the right of the enemy's line remained intact, and poured a severe flank-fire upon
the One Hundred and Sixteenth. The regiment changed front under fire, and before the enemy
could form to receive the attack, drove him, in a charge, from his position. It then re-formed
and joined its brigade, posted behind a stone wall, and facing another, behind which the enemy
was trying to rally. The men were allowed to rest a few moments, and then they again charged
and drove the enemy from the stone wall to his intrenchments. The regiment was placed imme-
diately in front of a battery, and as the enemy began to get the range it moved forward to the
crest of a hill, and very soon silenced the guns. At this juncture Custer's cavalry came upon the
enemy, and he was compelled to fall back to Fisher's Hill. The regiment lost four killed and
twenty-two wounded. At the battle of Fisher's Hill the One Hundred and Sixteenth, with its
command, succeeded in flanking the enemy's works. Then it charged and routed the enemy
completely. Colonel Wells, in his official report, said : " The One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio
charged the battery in the angle of the Rebel works, received its fire when only one hundred
yards from it, never wavered, but, rushing on, captured it in the very smoke of its discharge."
The regiment lost one man killed and four wounded.

The One Hundred and Sixteenth was left behind to bury the dead and attend to the pris-
oners and captured property, and having done this it joined the command at Harrisonburg.
From this point it was sent to Dayton, where it was engaged in guarding mills which were grind-
ing wheat for the army. It remained here until the 6th of October, and on the loth it skir-
mished at Cedar Creek, with considerable loss. On the 19th it participated in the general engage-
ment. At first it was driven back with the rest of the army, but upon the arrival of General
Sheridan the Rebels were checked, and finally routed completely. The regiment left Cedar
Creek on the 9th of November, and arrived at Opequan Crossing on the 18th. Here it remained
guarding the railroad until the 19th of December, when it moved by way of Washington City
and joined the Army of the James, at Aiken's Landing, where it went into winter-quarters.

On the 26th of March, 1865, the regiment broke camp and moved upon the Petersburg cam-
paign. It was engaged almost constantly, and participated in the assault on Fort Gregg. It
was a hand-to-hand fight, and many of the prisoners were badly wounded with bayonets. A

Rebel Captain cried : " Never surrender to the d d Yankees !" but the words were hardly out

of his mouth when John Cole, of company B, laid him dead with the butt of his musket. The
regiment joined the pursuit of the Rebel armies. On arriving at Burksville the right wing of
the regiment was sent out on the Danville Road, but the left wing moved on to Appomattox C.
H., where Lee surrendered. After the surrender the left wing moved to Lynchburg. On the
15th of April it moved to Burksville, where it wa3 joined by the right wing and the entire regi-
ment moved to Richmond, arriving on the 25th.

On the 14th of June the regiment, with the exception of companies F and K, was mustered
out. As these two companies' time did not expire until the last of October, they were consoli-
dated with the Sixty-Second Ohio. On the 15th the regiment embarked on steamer and pro-
ceeded to Fortress Monroe, thence to Baltimore, whence it was placed on cars and transported by
way of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad to Camp Dennison, Ohio. On the 23d of June, 1865,
it was paid and discharged.



608



Ohio in the War.



117th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



KOSTEH, THP.EE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



Lt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon
1)0.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



Ohaunct.y G. IIawley.

Koruyce M. Keith

John L. Fihestone

C. M. Finch

\V»I. C. I'AINK

Strickland Allhuiou

Silas E. Sheldon

Wm. T. Evans

Robert W. Caldwell

Win. C. Hays

Leonidas C. lleaton

Henry L. flames

James A. Murphy

Amos I?. Cole

James Gate wood

Wm. .1. Kvans

Win. Carroll

Samuel Kevins

Beiij. F. Hoi man

John C. Morgan

Alex. F. McMillen

Jacob M. Tener

Francis Walter

James C, Cadot

Joseph S. Jellries

Peter 1!. Hayes

George L. Hayes

John W. Wallace

James II. Oldson

Samuel B. Violet

Wm. S. Martin

Samuel Drummoud



Aug.
Sept.
Dec.

May

July

A ug.



Oct.
July
Aug.



Oct.
Inly
Aug.



21, 1852
30, "
S, "

19, "
II, "
22

fi, lS(i.1

20, "

ft, l.si;:



Feb.
May
.luiy
Dec.



Promoted to Colonel in 1st Ohio II. A.
Promoted to Lt. Col. in 1st Ohio H. A.

Transferred to 1st Ohio H. A.

Resigned November y, 1S52.

Declined.

Resigned August IS, 18(8.

Com mission returned.

Declined ; com m ission returned.

Promoted lo Major in 1st Ohio H. A.

Resigned December 1. I8R3.

Resigned November 14, 1S63.

1 I

I

;• Transferred to 1st Ohio H. A.

)

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Resigned December 14, 1S63.

Promoted.

Resigned March 21, 1SG3.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.



117th OHIO VOL. INFANTRY AND 1st OHIO HEAVY ARTILLERY.



THIS regiment was organized as the One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Infantry, at
Camp Portsmouth, September 15, 1862, with eight companies of seven hundred and
ninety-six aggregate strength. On the 2d of October, it was ordered into Eastern Ken-
tucky. Camping at Ashland till January, it then moved to Paintsville and dispersed a portion
of Floyd's army, under Colonel Jack Hays. It remained in camp at Buffalo Shoals near Paints-
ville till February, then returned to Peach Orchard, Louisa, and Catlettsburg ; and was ordered to
Covington, where it arrived the same month. During the spring it was sent on numerous expedi-
tions to Cynthiana, Paris, Lexington, Mount Sterling, and interior points, to meet raids of Morgan
and other guerrillas. On the 2d of May, 1863, the regiment was ordered by the War Department
to be changed into the First Heavy Artillery Ohio Volunteers, and recruited to the maximum
strength of that organization. August 12th it was so reorganized with twelve companies, of five
officers each and one hundred and forty-seven men, and an aggregate strength of one thousand
eight hundred and thirty-nine officers and men. During its recruitment it constructed the fine and
extensive fortifications for eight miles around Covington and Newport, making Cincinnati one of
the strongest fortified cities in the Union. Company D, Captain Barnes, was stationed at Paris;
companies F and I, Captain Cole commanding, at Lexington, and companies H, K, L, and M,
under Major Matthews, at Camp Nelson. In January, 1864, the regiment was ordered to Knox-
ville, Tennessee, and assembling at Point Burnside remained there till February 29th, when it
started over the mountains in the heavy snow and very cold weather of that winter, under com-
mand of Major Matthews, and arrived at Knoxville, March 9th.



One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Infantry. 609

In June four companies, under Major Barnes, were stationed at Loudon, and a detachment at
Strawberry Plains. In August, Wheeler made his raid in rear of Sherman's army, and striking
the Chattanooga, Knoxville and Virginia Railroad above Chattanooga, was driven away from the
road by the regiment, from the Sweetwater to Strawberry Plains, a distance of one hundred and
fifty miles, and he was able to do no serious damage to its heavy bridges or the Government sup-
plies in East Tennessee, though attacking furiously at Sweetwater, the Tennessee River, at Loudon,
and Strawberry Plains.

On September 21st, companies B, F, G, I, and K, under Colonel Hawley, started on the raid
with cavalry, under General Gillem, all under General Ammen, commanding District of East
Tennessee, to act in concert with General Burbridge's expedition from Kentucky in the raid on
Saltville. General Vaughn attacked the command at Bull's Gap, September 24th, but was easily
repulsed. The column moved up rapidly through Greenville and Jonesboro', arriving at Carter's
Station, on the Watauga River, one hundred and fourteen miles from Knoxville, on the 27th,
where it found Vaughn and Debrill strongly fortified. After a severe fight they were driven from
their works. The expedition under Burbridge having failed to take the salt-works, notwithstand-
ing Vaughn and Debrill were prevented from assisting in its defense, the command, after destroy-
ing the railroad bridge over the Watauga, returned to Bull's Gap and Knoxville.

The regiment moved to Cleveland, Tennessee, October 7th, and soon thereafter to Chatta-
nooga, at the concentration of troops there to guard against Hood's movement in rear of Sher-
man; but on the 19th returned to Cleveland and Charleston. It soon joined in the cavalry raid
under General Stoneman against Saltville ; and on the return of that expedition in December,
with the Fourth Tennessee Infantry and detachments of the Tenth Michigan Cavalry and First
United States Colored Artillery, as a provisional brigade, under Colonel Hawley, covered an ex-
tensive foraging expedition on the French, Broad, and Chucky Rivers in East Tennessee and North
Carolina; during the winter of 1S64 ami 1865, occupying Dandridge, Allen's Ford, Leadville,
Greenville, and Newport. With constant detached fighting with guerrillas of Vaughn's and
Debrill's commands, a large amount of grain, beef, and pork, were obtained and floated down to
Knoxville, for the army in East Tennessee. Among other fights an expedition was planned of two
hundred men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Keith, to take possession of the fords of the rivers in the
night, prevent an escape and drive in the guerrilla bands. Captain Norman, a notorious bush-
whacker leader, and his band were caught in the trap, and he and ten of his men killed.

Hundreds of prisoners, escaping from Salisbury and other prisons in the winter and spring,
canre into the lines of the regiment emaciated and in rags ; they all told the same sad story of
suffering, and how they were piloted from station to station over the mountains by the loyal moun-
taineers. Many soldiers were killed by the guerillas in attempting to escape. George Dudley,
from near Cincinnati, escaping from Salisbury, got within five miles of the camp, and was shot
by bushwhackers in Cocke County, Tennessee. His comrades escaped.

In the spring of 1865 the regiment was brigaded with the Fourth Tennessee Infantry, First
United States Colored Artillery, First and Second North Carolina Infantry, Fortieth United
States Colored Infantry, and Wilder's Independent Battery, as the First Brigade, Fourth Divis-
ion, Department of the Cumberland, Colonel C. G. Hawley commanding brigade.

The brigade was about seven thousand strong. In connection with General Stoneman's raid
and the general advance of troops, the brigade moved toward Virginia and North Carolina and
occupied the mouth of Roane Creek and Taylorsville in East Tennessee, and State Gap, Boone,
Watauga Gap, and Head of Yadkin, in North Carolina, shutting up all the mountain passes to
the retreating Rebels in Virginia; General Stanley with his corps moving from East Tennessee up
the line of the Virginia Railroad. After the surrender of Lee and Johnston the brigade was
6ent down to Ashville, North Carolina, toward Wilson's cavalry, and occupied Raban's Gap in
Georgia and Saluda Gap in South Carolina; and at Webster, Tennessee, received the surrender of
the hostile Indians, two thousand strong, under their chief, the Rebel General Thomas. Return-
ing to Greenville, Tennessee, the regiment remained in camp till July 15th, when it started home-
ward for the muster-out and was discharged and paid at Camp Deuniscn August 1, 1865.
Vol. II.— 39.



610



Ohio in the War.



118th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



SAMUEL R. MOTT

THOMAS L. YOUNG....

EDGAR SOWERS

John Walkuf '.

Thomas L. Young

Lester Bliss

Wm. Kennedy

Edgar Sowers

Thomas L. Young

Lester Bliss

Wm. Dowling

Edgar Sowers

John W. Kinkead

Wm. H. Phillips

W. Morrow Beach

Harrison A. Bodman

Wm. B. Shaffer

N. S. Richardson

John E. Patterson

John Boggs

Wm. Dowling

Soloifton Kranor

lames L. Booth

Wm. Kennedy

Wm. D. Stone

Edgar Sowers

Rudolph Ruel

Samuel Howard

John Buchanan

Barton A. Holland

John D. Garner

Charles Floyd

Wm. H. Taylor

John W. Kinkead

Fohn D. Garner

lohn S. Rhodes

Amos J. Moor

Wm. P. Davis

lames M. Russell

Charles P. Washburn

Samuel A. NickeTson

Isham B. Bobbins

Rollin C. Curtis

Abram 0. Waucop

Sidney F. Moore

David M. Doty

losephus S. Parker

Josiah Gallup

Lester Bliss

John W. Kinkead

Thomas Axtell

Martin L. Higgins

John W. Kirkbride

Charles Floyd

Wm. H.Taylor

David L. Williams

Darius Pendleton

John D. Garner

Wm. B. Wise

John S. Rhodes

Alban A. Bishop

Amos J. Moor

Wm. P. Davis

Milton B. Patterson

James M. Russell

Charles P. Washburn

Samuel A. Nickerson

Isham B. Rohbins

Rollin C. Curtia

Abram 0. Waucop

Sidney F. Moore

Thomas R. Owens

David M. Doty

Josephus S. Parker

Joel Eckels .....

George M. Thompson

Joel C. Loyd

Byron Bowers

Robert M. Campbell

Charles Kimmer

Thomas H. Jones

Jesse Clum

Anthony Bowsher

Samuel H. Kennedy

Wm. H. Pingree



Oct.

April

Line

Sept.

April

Oct.
Ian.

Aug.
April

Oct.

Ian.

Aug.

April

Aug.

Sept.

Dec.

April

Oct.

July

Vug.



DATE OF RANK.



March
\pril

Oct.



A pril
Sept.
Aug.
July



Aug.



March
April



March
April



April 8,



5, 1S62
11, 1864
20, 18(15

5, 1862
17, 1863

11, 1*4

12, "

6, 1S65

22, 1862

17, 1S63

11, 1861

12, •"

6, 1865
19, 1862

19, 1*4

27, 1862
L "

26, "

28, 1864

7, 1862

18, "

20, "
II, "
11, "

13, "
13, "
16, "
16, "
16, "

5, "
2, "

15, "

2, "

3, 1864
11, "

11, "

12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "

12, "

6, 1865
6, "
6, "

23, "

8, "

13, 1S62
25,
18,
21,
23,
11.
13,
13,
15,
16,
23,

5,
15,
2,

24, 1S63
31,
17,
84,
17,

1, 1864

1,

3,
11.
11.
12,
12,
12,
12,
12,
12,
12,

6, 1865

6. "

6,
23,
23,



COM. ISSUED.



Dec.
April
June
Dec.
April

Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
April

Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
May
Dec.

Feb.
April
Dec.



2:;

1(1

23

23
10

a

23

s

23

23
23
23,
23
23
23
23
2:;
20
20

April 8
March 3
April 11
T ' 11



Jan.



Oct.



A pril
Dec.



Jan.
April
May



April
Feb.



March 3

April

Oct.



April



18h3
1864
1865
1862
1863
1864

1865
1862
1863
1864

1865
1862
1864
1862

1863
1864

1862



Resigned February 10, 1864.

Resigned as Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 14, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.

Resigned April 17, 1863.

Promoted to Colonel.

Honorably discharged July 1, 1864.

Resigned December 12, 1864.

Promoted to Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned August 7, 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned May 7, 1864.

Resigned December 3, 1862.

Resigned February 5, 1864.

Promoted to Surgeon 13th O.V.C., Oct. 20, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned December 10, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned July 6, 1S64.

Resigned December 2, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Honorably discharged July 16, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 20, 1864.

Resigned April 1, 1864.

Resigned December 15, 1862.

Resigned February 11, 186-1.

Commission returned.

Resigned April 24, 1864.

Resigned September 19, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned November 22, 1864.

Declined to accept.

Resigned April 16, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Commission returned.

Dismissed April 24, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 31, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 21, 1863.

Reigned March 24, 1863.

Resigned January 8, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned October 25, 1863.

Resigned April 19, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Detached at own request.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged March 18, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged May 24, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Detached at own request.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died December 21, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment. .

Commission returned ; transferred to V. K. O.

Declined to accept.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned May 15, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Transf. to 183d O.V.I., G.O. No. 11, June 15, '6».



One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio Infantry. 611



DATE OF BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



let Lieutenant
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Fraley Fink

Barton A. Holland

Alban A. Bishop

Isham B. Bobbins

Samuel A. Nickerson.

John McDowell

Win. P. Davis

John S. Rhodes

Milton B. Patterson...

Amos J. Moor

Daniel A. Krites

Rollin C. Curtis

James M. Russell

Abram 0. YVaucop

Sidney F. Moore

John Eckles

Thomas K. Owens

David M. Doty

Josephus S. Parker

Joel Eckels

George M. Thompson.

Joel C. Loyd

Byron Bowers

Kobert M. Campbell...
Henry H. Robinson...
Samuel H. Kennedy...



May
July



Aug.



Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Dec.

April

May

April

March

Feb.



April
Jan.



2,


1865


May


2,


2\


1862


Dec.


Z\


21,


"


11


■r.


12,


"


41


■a.


13,


"


"


23


1*,
15,

16.


«


;;


23,

2.",
2,1


16,


"


"


2.",


L«,


41


**


23


6,


"


**


23


j>


•*


**


2.',


3,


1863


Jan.


27


16,


1862


March


13


2,


"


April


\'.i


17,


1863


May


26


21,


**


**


2fi


21,


14


11


26


?A,


11


11


26


1,

1,


1864


Feb.


13

1.".


1,

11,


><


April


13
11


>l,


M


■'


II


11.


"


**


11


V,,


1S65


Jan.


2:;



lsfi.-»

1.MJ2



Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned January 3, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned December 28, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Died July 1, 1S«4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant; revoked.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



118th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH OHIO went into camp at
Lima, Ohio, in August, 1862, and in September it was sent (eight companies strong)
to Cincinnati, then threatened by Kirby Smith. Here the ninth company was formed,
and the regiment mustered into the service.

In the latter part of September it moved with the troops under General A. J. Smith toward



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 108 of 165)