Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 109 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 109 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Lexington, Kentucky, and at Cynthiana was detached to guard the railroad. The regiment was
distributed at different points, from Benton's Station to Paris, and about twenty stockades were
erected at the various bridges. A large amount of guard and patrol-duty was performed, Rebel
recruiting was almost entirely prevented, and much valuable information was obtained and com-
municated to the proper authorities. On the 8th of August, 1863, it proceeded via Lexington
and Louisville, to Lebanon, Kentucky, and on the 20th set out on the march for East Tennessee.
This march over the mountains occupied seventeen days, and was very severe, the men suffering
greatly from heat and dust. On the 10th of November it reached Kingston, and a few days after
the Rebels cut the communication between that point and Knoxville. The picket-duty became
very heavy, in order to prevent surprise from Wheeler's cavalry. The victories at Knoxville
and Chattanooga relieved the garrison at Kingston, and on the 9th of December the regiment
reached Nashville, and moved from there to Blain's Cross Roads, and from there to Mossy
Creek to support Elliott's cavalry.

On the 29th of December the Rebel cavalry, commanded by Generals Martin and Arm-
strong, attacked General Elliott at Panther's Creek, who fell back to Mossy Creek. As the cav-
alry approached the regiment took position in the edge of a woods, and the Rebel force moved
directly upon them. When the enemy approached within a hundred yards the regiment opened
a rapid fire, which it kept up about two hours and then charged, driving the Rebels over the
crest of a hill. In this engagement the One Hundred and Eighteenth lost about forty killed and
and wounded. It was handled with skill by Lieutenant-Colonel Young, and was commanded by
General Elliott. While in East Tennessee the regiment endured great privations, subsisting for



612 Ohio in the War.

six months on quarter and half rations. The men were without sugar and coffee for four
months ; salt was doled out by the spoonful, and corn in the ear was issued, out of which the
men made hominy. In addition, they were destitute of clothing ; and yet no murmurs were
heard ; but, on the contrary, cheerfulness prevailed to a wonderful degree.

The regiment was engaged in marching and counter-marching, with nothing of special inter-
est occurring, until the campaign of 1864. It marched to Charleston, a distance of one hundred
miles, in five days; and on the 4th of May it encamped at the State line. Here all the baggage
was sent to the rear ; only two wagons were allowed to the regiment, and arms and ammunition
were carefully inspected. On the 7th the One Hundred and Eighteenth moved upon Dalton,
and from there advanced upon Resaca. During' the afternoon of the 14th it participated in a
charge upon the enemy's works, and, out of three hundred men actually engaged, lost one hun-
dred and sixteen in less than ten minutes. The engagement was renewed on the 15th, and that
night Johnston retired to Cassville, which place he abandoned on the approach of the National
army. After a few days' rest the regiment engaged in the fierce battles of Dallas and Pumpkin-
Vine Creek, bearing a gallant part. It continued advancing and fortifying, until, overcome with
constant labor, much sickness prevailed among officers and men.

The regiment was engaged at Kenesaw Mountain, at the crossing of the Chattahoochie, in
the operations on Utoy Creek, and in the final movements which occasioned the fall of Atlanta.
In these operations it lost about seventy-five men, and at no time during the campaign, after
the 1st of June, did it number over two hundred and fifty men, and it diminished at one time to
one hundred and twenty. During one hundred and twenty-one consecutive days the regiment
was within hearing of hostile firing every day but one; during sixty consecutive days it was
under fire sixty different times; and during one week there probably was not five minutes that
the whistling of a ball or the scream of a shot or shell could not be heard. After the fall of
Atlanta the regiment fell back to Decatur, where it rested a short time, and then joined the pur-
suit of Hood, and followed as far as Gaylesville, Alabama. It proceeded to Johnsonville, Ten-
nessee, on the 23d of November ; went to Columbia to join the army confronting Hood, and on
the 30th reached Franklin.

The brigade of which the One Hundred and Eighteenth was a part was drawn up in a single
■line, its right resting on the Williamsburg Pike and its left at the Locust Grove, the One Hun-
dred and Eighteenth being the second regiment from the right. The enemy struck the line a
little to the left of the One Hundred and Eighteenth. The shock was terrible, but it stood
firmly, and poured a destructive fire into the Rebels. The men fought desperately, using their
bayonets over the breastworks and the officers using their side-arms. By daylight the One Hun-
dred and Eighteenth was across the river and falling back on Nashville, where it was again
engaged. After the battle of Nashville it participated in the pursuit of the Rebels as far as
Columbia, and from there went to Clifton.

At that point orders were received to proceed to North Carolina, and on January 16, 1865,
the regiment embarked on the steamer J. D. Baldwin for Cincinnati, and there took cars for
Washington, District of Columbia, arriving on the 27th of January, 1865. It embarked on a
steamer at Alexandria, February 11th ; landed at Smithville, at the mouth of the Cape Fear
River; moved immediately on Fort Anderson, and soon captured it, the One Hundred and
Eighteenth being the first regiment to plant its colors on the walls. On the 20th of February it
was engaged in a sharp action at Town Creek, in which three hundred prisoners and two pieces
of artillery were captured, and on the 22d entered Wilmington. On the 6th of March it moved
to .Kingston, and from there to Goldsboro', where it joined Sherman's army, March 23d. It
camped at Mosely Hall till April 9th, when it participated in the final movements against John-
ston. The regiment camped near Raleigh until the 3d of May, when it moved to Greensboro',
and thence to Salisbury, where it remained until the 24th of June, when it was mustered out of
the service. The One Hundred and Eighteenth arrived at Cleveland July 2d, was welcomed by
Chief-Justice Chase, participated in the celebration of the 4th of July, and received its final dis-
charge on the 9th of July, 1865.



One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio Infantry. 613
U9th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.

The organization of the One Hundred and Nineteenth Ohio was begun but not completed.



120th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


Sept.


10, 1862


Nov.


17, 1862


Feb.


18, 186:;


March 30


1863


Oct.


2, 1S6-J


Nov.


17


1862


Feb.


18, 18i>3


March


30


1863


Sept.


8, "


Jan.


10


1864


f 4


4, 1862


Nov.


17


1862


Feb.


IS, 1863


March


30


1863


Sept.


8, "


Jan.


in


IS64


4 *


4, 1862


Sov.


IV


1862


Dec.


26, "


Dec.


26


l *


Sept.


1, "
4, "


Nov.


17
17


••


Feb.


23, 1864


Feb.


23


1864


Aug.


4, 1862

12, "

13, "
15, "
15, "
21, "


Nov.


17

17
17
17
17
17


1862


Sept.


12, '■




17




Oct.


14', "
14, "


"


17
17


"


.Fan.


14, 1S63


March 30


IS63


Feb.


17', "
20, "
18, "


||


30
30
30
30


"


March


14, "
14, "


..


30
30


ti


"


23, "


Sept.


3


"


Sept.


N "


Jan.


111


1864


March


21, 1864
21, •'
21, "


March


21
21
21


,,


Aug.


11, "
11, "


Aug.


11
11


..


"


25, 1862


Nov.


17


1S62


* l


25, "




17


11


11


4, "


**


17


*'


"


12, "


"


17


"


..


15, "

15, "


..


1/
17


..


..


15, "

21, "


n


17
17


..


Sept.


1, "
12, "


..


17
17


..


Oct.


14 "
14, "


>■


17
17


ii


Jan.


14, 1S63


March


30


1863


March


15, "

15, "


it


30

30


..


•Fan.


14, "


••


sn


11


.March


15, "
15, "
15, "


|;


.",0
30

:;o


;;


Feb.


18, "


'•


an


**


Match


5, "
15, "


..


30
30


-


June


1. "


June


10


14


Aug.


1, "


Aug.


25


11


March


23, "


Jan.


10


18Tvl


'•


21, 1S64


March


21


*'


July


30, 1863

31, "


Jan.


10
10


ii


Sept.


8, "


"


10


**



Colonel

Do

lit. Colonel....

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do .-.

Burgeon

Do

ABs't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Captain

Do! "'."'.'.'.'.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Jet Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



DANIEL FRENCH

MARCUS M. SPIEGEL.

Marcus M. Spiegel

John W. Beekman

WlLLARD SLOCUM

John W. Beekman

WlLLARD SLOCUM

John F. McKinley

VV. W. Taggeut

Byron Stanton

John W. Hammond

C. O. Stofer

John C. Gill

Rufus M. Brayton

Joseph H. Downing

John F. McKinley

George P. Enirich

Benj. Eason

Henry Buck

Win. G. Myers

Patrick Phclau.

Christopher Au

George W. Conyer

Henry H. Eberhait

Loyd N. Meech ,

Wm. Mcllvaine ,

John Sloan

John K. Smith

Joseph R. Rummel

Valentine Moffitt

James B. Taylor

Wui. Harvey

Benj. F. Miller

Elias Fraunfclder

Benj. F. Jones v .

Wesley W. Spear ..

Harvey Applegate

Willard Siocuui

Ezra V. Dean

John E. Strickler

Henry H. Eberhait

Thomas J. Armstrong....

Robert R. Gailey

Joseph E. Roseborough ..

Uobert M. Zuver

Loyd N. Meech

Bryan Grant

Wm. Mcllvaine

lohn K. Smith

Hiram E. Totten ,

Samuel A. English

Benj. F. Miller

Wm. Harvey

Henry S. Sherman ,

Augustus Case

Elias Fraunfelder

James B. Taylor

Reuben Bechtel

Benj. F. Jones

Frank H. Mason

John D. Mackey

Wesley W. Speur

Wm. Hughes

Harvey Applegate

Wm. B. Milliken

Wm. Van Ostern



Resigned February 18, 1863.

Killed in action.

Promoted to Colonel.

Died September 8, 1863.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Transferred to 114th 0. V. I.

Resigned November 13, 1862.

Transferred to 114th O. V. I.

Mustered out.

Resigned January 26, 1864.

Transferred to 114th O. V.

Resigned January 14, 1S63.

Resigned February 18, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned March 14, 1663.

Resigned March 14, 1863.

Resigned February 15, 1863.

Resigned February 5, 1863.

Died February 17, 1863.

Mustered out.

Died Marcli 23, 1863.

Transferred to 114th O. V. I.

Resigned January 12. 1864.

Resigned July 19, 1864.

Died September 19, 1863.

Resigned September 29, 1863.

Transferred to 114th O. V. I.

Resigned January 7, 1864.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Transferred to 114th 0. V. I.

Transferred to 114th O. V. I.

Mustered out.

Transferred to 114th 0. V. I.

Transferred to lHth 0. V. I. as 1st Lieut.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned October 22, 1S63.

Resigned January 14, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Deceased.

Resigned March 14, 1863.

Resigned March 23, 1863.

Resigned January 14, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged Marcli 11, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died September 12, 1S63.

Resigned July 30, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 31, 1.-63.

Resigned October 15, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Deceased.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined; commission returned.

Died September 21, 1804

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Transferred to 114th O. V. I.

Transferred to 114th 0. V. I.



614



Ohio in the War.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Robert P. Wallace....

John Baer

John B. Drown

John \V. Galehouse.,

Mahlon Itouch

John 8'. Petty

Emanuel H. Bixler..

James R. Pollock

Josoph R. Rummel...

Isaiah Jones

Martin J. Stanley

Alex. Morrow

Wni. Haryey

Valentine Moffitt

Hiram E. Totten

James B. Taylor

John Sloan

Samuel A. English...
Henry S. Sherman. ...

Wm. B. Millilven

Franklin Stotler.



Harvey Applegate .
«. W. Althouse



John Ambrose..

Wm. Hughes

Wesley W. Spear....
Robert P. Wallace.
John A. McMillan.,
Wm. Van Ostern...

John Baer

Lucius C. Carr

Wm. Q. Lawrence..
Mahlon Rouch



DATE OF KANK



Aug.



March 21,
21,
21,
21,
11,
11,

Oct. 12,

12,

Aug. 4,

12,

" 12,

" 13,

" 15,

19,

15,

" 15,

Sept. 21,

Oct. 6,

Jan. 14,

March 15,

15,

15,

15,

15,

" 15,

" 15,

" 15.

15,

15,

15,

11,

U,

March 21, I



June
July



COM. ISSUED.



March 21,
21,
21,
21,
11,
11.
12,
12,



Aug.



17,

" 17,

17,

" IT,

" 17,

" 17,

17,

17,

17,

March 25,

30,

30,

30,

30,

" 30,

30,

" 30,

" 30,



Aug.



25,
March 21,



BEMABKS.



Transferred to 114th 0. V
Transferred to 114th 0. V,
Mustered out.
Mustered out.
Mustered out.
Transferred to 114th O. V. I.
Mustered out.

Transferred to 114th 0. V. I.
Promoted.

Resigned January 14, 18fi3.
Resigned March 14, 1863.
Resigned February 18. 18(53.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned July 11, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant,
liesigned June 15, 1863.
Resigned July 11, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned January 30, 1S64.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out.
Mustered out.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



I. as 2d Lieut.
I.



120th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFAimtY.



THE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTIETH OHIO was organized at Camp
Mansfield, near Mansfield, Ohio (under the call of the President for the second three
hundred thousand men), in the month of August, 1862.

Five companies, raised in the counties of Wayne and Ashland, formed the nucleus of the
regiment, and assembled at the camp of rendezvous on the 29th of August, 1862. The remaining
companies came from Richland, Ashland, and Holmes Counties. On the 17th of October it was
armed, equipped, and mustered into the United States service with an aggregate of nine hundred
and forty-nine men. On the 25th of October the One Hundred and Twentieth left Camp Mans-
field with orders to report to General Wright at Cincinnati. On its arrival it was ordered to
report to General Ammen, commanding at Covington, Kentucky, and on the same day it crossed
the Ohio and went into camp, where it remained nearly one month. On the 24th of November it
embarked on transports at Covington, and reached Memphis on the 7th of December. Upon the
organization of the army for the expedition against Vicksburg the regiment was assigned to Col-
onel Sheldon's brigade, of General Morgan's division. This, called the right wing of the Army of
the Tennessee, commanded by Major-General W. T. Sherman, embarked at Memphis on the 20th
of December, and moved down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Yazoo River; thence up the
Yazoo to Johnson's Landing, and there debarked preparatory to an attack on the line of fortifica-
tions defending Vicksburg.

The attack was opened by the National forces late on the afternoon of the 26th of November,
and on the following day the One Hundred and Twentieth was for the first time under fire, hav-
ing been ordered to the support of the First Michigan Battery near the left of the attacking col-
umn. In the afternoon of the same day Sheldon's brigade, consisting of the Sixty-Ninth Indiana,
One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois, and the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, charged upon
the enemy's forces on the extreme right, and succeeded in driving them into their fortifications.
A charge by the Ninth Division (General Morgan's) was now contemplated, but night coming on
our troops were withdrawn to a place of safety. This charge, though unsuccessful, was made on



One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio Infantry. 615

the following day. The One Hundred and Twentieth had been ordered to cover a working party
engaged in laying a pontoon across Chickasaw Bayou, and hence took no part in this assault, but
was exposed to the enemy's tire during the entire day. A terrible rain-storm, peculiar to that
climate, raged during the whole of the ensuing night, which, owing to the inexperience of the
officers and men of the regiment, proved very disastrous, prostrating a large number with fevers
and other virulent diseases common to the South. The fruitlessness of the attack on Vicksburg
from the Yazoo being recognized, the National forces were withdrawn and taken on transports to
Milliken's Bend, on the Mississippi River, where Major-General McClernand assumed command.
The unavoidable use of the miserable water of the Yazoo River, the expo3ure in the recent
6torm, close confinement on crowded steamboats, and poorly-prepared food, here made its mark to
such extent that more than one-half the number reported "present" were unfit for active service.

The movement against Arkansas Post was now begun. On the 5th of January the fleet
moved from Milliken's Bend, and on the 9th ascended the White River, and thence by a connect-
ing canal passed into the Arkansas, and proceeded up that river to a point three miles from Fort
Hindman, at Arkansas Post. On the 10th the whole force disembarked, and on the following
night completely invested the entire fortifications, behind which the enemy had about five thou-
sand troops. The attack commenced on the morning of the 11th of January, and was stubbornly
resisted. The One Hundred and Twentieth was in position on the extreme left of the line, along
the river bank below Fort Hindman. At four o'clock P. M. a charge was ordered on the left.
The brigades of Burbridge and Landrum charged upon the outer fortifications, while the One Hun-
dred and Twentieth charged directly upon the fort. The enemy, finding that further resistance
would be futile, displayed the white flag.

The One Hundred and Twentieth, it is claimed, was the first regiment of the National forces
to enter Fort Hindman, Sergeant Wallace, of company C, color-bearer of the regiment, having
gallantly scaled the parapet of the fort and planted the colors of his regiment, an act which
shortly afterward brought him a Lieutenant's commission.

The fortifications were destroyed by the victorious troops, after which they proceeded by river
to Young's Point, Louisiana, six miles above Vicksburg. This place proved to be another
unhealthy locality, and the One Hundred and Twentieth suffered so severely from measles and
typhus malarial fever that, during the month of February, half the aggregate number present
were reported on the sick-list. A large number of the officers became discouraged, and, unwill-
ing to await the issue of their illness, tendered their resignations. Among them was Colonel
Daniel French, the acceptance of whose resignation bears date February 18, 1863. The Colonel
was constrained to take this step because of the re-appearance of a disease which he had con-
tracted in the Mexican war. His retirement from the service was deeply regretted. Among the
great number who died at Young's Point were three of the best officers of the regiment, viz. : Cap-
tain Phelan, of company H ; First-Lieutenant Armstrong, of company C, and Captain Conyer.

In the month of February the army at Young's Point was reorganized, and General Grant
assumed personal command. The One Hundred and Twentieth was assigned to the Third Brigade
(Garrard's), Ninth Division (Osterhaus's), and Thirteenth Army Corps (McClernand's). About
the middle of March General McClernand's corps moved up to Milliken's Bend, and on the 1st
of April marched from that point, Garrard's brigade in advance, to occupy New Carthage. Hav-
ing reached that place, the Thirteenth Corps proceeded by a circuitous route to Parker's planta-
tion, on the west side of the Mississippi, twenty-five miles below Vicksburg. In the meantime a
fleet of iron-clads and several transports had run the gauntlet of the Vicksburg batteries, and on
the 29th of April the Thirteenth Corps dropped down to Hard Times Landing, about three miles
from Grand Gulf, where the enemy was strongly fortified. The troops were retained on board
the transports in readiness to land and take part in the reduction of that place, relying on the
navy to silence the enemy's batteries. The navy failed, and the corps debarked and marched to
a point three "miles below Grand Gulf, and there awaited the arrival of the fleet, which succeeded
in running the enemy's batteries that night. Bruinsburg was the next point of debarkation, and
the troops having landed, they at once marched in pursuit of the Rebel forces under General



616 Ohio in the War.

Greene. At midnight of April 20th the National forces caught up with the Rebels, who occupied
a strong position on Thompson's Hill, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The attack began early on
the following morning. General Osterhaus's division was engaged on the extreme left, at which
point the One Hundred and Twentieth was stationed. The position was well and steadily held,
and late in the afternoon a charge was made, which resulted in the complete discomfiture and rout
of the enemy. Instant pursuit was made, but night put an end to the combat, the National troops
bivouacking on the field of battle. The loss of the One Hundred and Twentieth in this action was
one for every eight of the number engaged. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps having come
up, the whole force was pushed forward, capturing Jackson, Raymond, and other places of mili-
tary importance, within the fortnight after the battle of Thompson's Hill.

The One Hundred and Twentieth remained at Raymond until the 18th of May, when it waa
ordered to the front, and joined the main army on the morning of the 19th, after a forced march
of twenty-two hours. Captain Eberhart, Lieutenant Wallace, and others of the regiment were
left sick in hospital at Raymond, and were captured by the enemy. On the day of the arrival of
the regiment within the National lines, in the rear of Vicksburg, a determined assault was made
on the enemy's fortifications, in which the One Hundred and Twentieth participated. It also
took part in a still more determined effort on the 22d of May. The division (Osterhaus's)
remained at Vicksburg, as part of the besieging force, until the 24th of May, when it was ordered
to Black River Bridge to guard against an approach of Rebel forces under General Joe John-
ston, and remained there until after the fall of Vicksburg.

On the 6th of July the regiment led the advance of the Thirteenth Corps in the expedition
against Jackson, Mississippi, moving along the line of railroad between that city and Black
River. The intrenchments in front of Jackson were reached on the 10th of July. The Thir-
teenth Corps formed the right wing of the attacking column. The One Hundred and Twentieth
was actively engaged in this attack from the day the investment began until the 17th of July, the
day on which the enemy evacuated the place and retreated across the Pearl River. During the
investment the regiment was under an almost constant fire of artillery and infantry. Its casual-
ties of officers were Colonel Spiegel and Lieutenant Spear severely, and Lieutenant Totten mor-
tally, wounded.

The regiment returned with the army to Black River Bridge, arriving there on the 20th of
July, and on the 21st was en route for Vicksburg, where it went into camp. On the 8th of August
the Thirteenth Army Corps (now commanded by Major-General Ord, a division of which was
commanded by General Washburne, the successor to Osterhaus) left Vicksburg for New Orleans,
and, after a week's detention at Port Hudson, arrived at its destination. The One Hundred and
Twentieth went into camp at Carrollton, a suburb of New Orleans, where it remained until the 5th
of September, when it accompanied the corps to Berwick City, and thence to Opelousas, returning
to Berwick City on the 9th of September. Soon after the regiment, in company with the Forty-
Second Ohio and Twenty-Second Kentucky, under the command of Colonel Sheldon, was sent to
Plaquemine, a small town on the Mississippi River, one hundred and ten miles above New Or-



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 109 of 165)