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Eleventh Corps, were ordered to the Western Department. These two corps were afterward
consolidated, forming the Twentieth Corps, under the command of General Jos. Hooker. Its
route Avas through Washington City, via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, through Columbus,
Indianapolis, Louisville, Nashville, to Wartrace, Tennessee, where it was ordered to construct
winter-quarters. Before, however, these quarters were fully completed, the brigade to which
the Seventh belonged was ordered to Bridgeport, Alabama.

It had been determined by General Grant, who was then in command of the department, to
drive the Rebels from their stronghold on Lookout Mountain, and for that purpose nearly all
the troops in his command were concentrated at or near Bridgeport. The Seventh Ohio was
ordered to leave its comfortable winter-quarters, and joined the troops at Bridgeport. It was
not brought under fire until it arrived at the foot of the mountain, at a point where the forma-
tion of the ground was such as to shield the men from the fire of the enemy. The guns on
the top of the mountain could not be depressed sufficiently to take effect. In order, there-
fore, to harass the National troops as much as possible, the Rebels shot off the tops of the
trees, that they might fall on their heads as they toiled up the slope. This lofty and rugged
mountain, with the enemy intrenched upon its summit, would have presented an obstacle seem-
ingly insurmountable to an army less disciplined, or one in want of patriotic zeal to inspire it.
Moving further up, the assaulting force was exposed to a severe musketry fire. A heavy fog
60on enveloped the whole mountain, and the firing ceased. At early dawn the enemy had dis-
appeared, and the Stars and Stripes were planted upon the highest pinnacle of the mountain.

The National army, fully alive to their great victory, swarmed down the mountain, across
the plains of Chattanooga, and up the sides of Mission Ridge, in pursuit of the enemy, but only
to meet with a feeble resistance. The enemy fled, pursued hotly through the day, which was
crowned with the capture of two thousand prisoners. The troops were in high spirits, and rent
the air with their jubilant cheers. The pursuit was continued until the 27th of November,
when the enemy posted himself in a strong position, called Taylor's Ridge, just beyond Ring-
gold, in order to prevent the National forces from passing through Thompson's Gap. Geary's
brigade was ordered to storm the heights. It formed in two columns, on the railroad, half a
mile north of the Gap, the Seventh Ohio occupying the right of the rear column.

The assault commenced. Just as the steep declivity was reached, the advance was halted
to return the enemy's fire. The rear column passed over it, and entered a gorge that was
directly in front. At this point the gallant Creighton shouted to his regiment: "Boys, we are
ordered to take that hill ; I want to see you walk right up to it !" And up they went, in the face
of a merciless fire in front, on right and left. Only one commissioned officer of the Seventh
Ohio was left uninjured. It was a fearful repulse, and all that was left the shattered remnant
was to fall back to the foot of the hill.

The loss of the regiment was very severe. Nineteen were killed and sixty-one wounded.
No positive advantage was gained, and the army fell back and encamped at Chattanooga. This
gallant charge cost the Seventh Ohio dearly. Two of its best and bravest officers went down
before the fearful storm of bullets. The fiery Creighton and the unflinching Crane were killed,
together with a score of noble and daring comrades. At this inauspicious time the question of
re-enlisting was presented to the members of the Seventh Ohio. Is it to be wondered that the
proposition was not favorably considered by these war-worn soldiers ?

This brings the history of the Seventh Ohio up to the 1st of January, 1864, at which time
it was again in its old camp at Bridgeport, Alabama. Here it spent the winter in comparative
quiet, with the exception of a few slight skirmishes, in which a few prisoners were captured.
On the 3d of May, the regiment left Bridgeport, under orders, and, passing in the vicinity of
Lookout Mountain, Ringgold, and Taylor's Ridge, it reached Rocky Face Ridge on the 8th of
May. At this place the enemy was found intrenched, but he was soon routed by Hooker's
corps. At Resaca the enemy again made a stand, and were again driven, and pursued until the



Seventh Ohio Infantry. 63

llth of June, with but slight loss to either side. This was the last service performed by the
Seventh Ohio as a regiment. It was ordered home to be mustered out. The recruits, whose
term of service had not yet ended, were consolidated with the Fifth Ohio, and pai-ticipated, with
that gallant regiment, in the brilliant and successful march of Sherman, through Georgia and
South Carolina, to the sea.

The Seventh proceeded by rail to Nashville ; thence by steamer to Cincinnati. There the
Fifth Ohio was met; and, as the citizens of Cincinnati were about to tender that regiment a
reception, the Seventh was invited to participate. The long and intimate relations between these
two regiments — the one representing the northern and the other the southern portion of the
State — made it doubly pleasant thus to meet and spend a few hours in social intercourse, at the
close of these long years of hardship and trial spent in the service of their country.

On Saturday, June 24, 1864, the regiment took its departure for Cleveland, and on the 8th
of July, 1864, was there mustered out of the service.

The Seventh had served a little more than three years. During that time, eighteen hun-
dred men had served with it ; and now, save some sixty new recruits transferred to the Veteran
Corps, only two hundred and forty able-bodied men remained to bring home their unsullied
colors, pierced through by the shot and shell of more than a score of battles. The regiment
performed an important part in the war. Enlisting, as it did, at the very outset of the rebell-
ion, it was kept well in the van during most of its service, and was present at most of the
severely-contested battles of the war. Its losses were severe in both officers and men ; yet in
all the trying scenes through which it passed, it was ever the same brave, ready, and enduring
body of soldiers.



64



Ohio in the War.



8th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

tt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass t Surgeon.
Captain

Bo! "."."""

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieu tenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



HERMIN O. DEPUY

Freeman E. Franklin

Henry F. Wilson

Ben J. Tappan

8. Sexton

Ezra W. Clapp, jr

Win. Kinney

Francis W. Butterlicld

Franklin Sawyer

James E. Gregg

Geo. 51. Tillottson

Wm. K. Hays

Win. W, Starr

Elizur 6. Johnson

Wilbur F. Fierce

Benj. F. Ogle

Wm. Delanv

Enoch W. Meniman

Horace Kellogg

John Bixby

Chas. M. Fouke

Edward D. Dickinson

Charles A. Park

Lewis Breckinridge

Henry W. Fritzs

Chas. W. Barnes

Christopher Keary

David Lewis

Daniel C. Daggatt

Alfred S. Craig

Everton J. Conger

Creighton Thompson

Harry C. Landun ,

David W. Houghton

Otis Shaw, jr



May



Lpril



May
April



May

April



4, 1861

4,
4,

2,

6.
18,
20,
20,

19,

22,
22,

S,
23,

6,
18,
20.
20,

8,
19,
22,
22,

ft,
23,

<>,
18,
20,
20.

9,
19,
22,
22,



May



May-
April



May
April



May

April



4, ISfil

4. "

4, "

2, "

2, "

6, "

18, "

20, "

20, "

8, "

iy, "

22, "



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Major

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do! ;;;";";;

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do



HERMIN G. DEPUY

S. S. CARROLL

Charles A. Park

Charles A. DeVilliers..

Franklin Sawyer

Franklin Sawyer

Albert H. Winslow

W. H. Lammi:

Thomas McEurigiit

J. L. Brenton

S. Sexton

Freeman A. Tuttle

J. S. Pollock

Lyman N. Freeman

Alex Miller

Albert II. Winslow

Francis W. Butterrield

Wilbur F. Pierce

Elizur G. Johnson

Oran H. Kelsea

James E. Gregg

Wm. Kinney

George M. Tillottson

Franklin Sawyer

William E. Haynes

Daniel C. Daggatt

Richard Allen

Benjamin F. Ogle

John Reed

Willis W. Miller

George S. Smith

David Lewis

Azor H. Nickerson

Alfred S. Craig

Edward D. Dickinson

James K. O'Riley

John G. Reed

Wm. W. Witherell



July

Dec.

July

June

N'ov.

July

Nov.

Sept.

Nov.

March

July

Dec.

Aug.

July

Feb.

June



26,



July

Dec.

July

June

Nov.

July

Nov.

Sept.

Dec.

March

Jan.



1862

1863



Aug.
liJuly
1863 Feb.
1861 June



July



Nov.

I'Yb.

March

Nov.

Jan.



1861
1862



1863
1864



April 22,



1862
1863

1861

isr,3
1861



X



July
Aug.
Nov.
March 20
April 11
Dec. 31
Feb. Ifi



April
March



April



i sc,:>

1853
1864



Resigned November 9, 1861. [out with regt.

Wounded at bat. of Spottsylvania ; mustered

Resigned November 4, 1861.

Elected Colonel Eleventh Regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned November 26, 1861.

Resigned January 2, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned October 23, 1862.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged November 27, 1862.

Resigned July 8, 186*.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted.

Mustered out with regiment.

Not mustered in.

Resigned March 11, 1862.

Mastered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.

Died March 4, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out for promotion, Nov. 3, 1862

Resigned February 6, 1862.

Resigned December 13, 1862.

Resigned November 27, 1862.

Cashiered February 1, 1865.

Honorably discharged January 8, 1*61

Honorably discharged August I, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged November 20, 1863.

Missing after battle of Wilderness.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.



Eightii Ohio Infantry.



65



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
SJ Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Dos

Do.



Benj. F. Ogle

David Lewis

Henry W. Fritzs

Lewis Breckinridge

Chas. A. Park

Win. Delauy

Willis W. Miller

Chas. M. Fouke

Edward D. Dickinson

Daniel (!. Daggatt

I'liilo W. Chase

James R. Swigort

John Reed .".

Win. M. Pearee

G. Shillito Smith

Chas. W. Barnes

Alfred P. Craig

Azor H. Nickerson

Elijah Hayden

Creighton Thompson

James K. O'Riley ,

John G. Reed

Herman Ruess

Wm. W. Withereil

Jacob P. Ilysung

Henry A. Farnuni

David R. Wallace

Kinney R. Loomis

John W. Depuy

Thomas F. Galway

Chas. Maiinahan

John W. Travis

Thomas II. Thorubaugh.

Oraniel G. Daniels

Stephen Strange

Chas. W. Barnes

Jacob P. Ilysung

Otis Shaw, jr

David W. Hougntou

Philo W. Chase

Alfred P. Craig

John Lantry

Authonv S. Sutton

Edward W. Cook

Creighton Thompson

Chas. W. Wright

Herman Ruess

Azor II. Nickerson

John G. Reed

Elijah Hayden

Wm. W. Withereil

Henry A. Farnuni

David R. Wallace

Horace II. Bills

John W. Depuy

Finney R. Loomis

Thomas F. Gal.tway

Chas. Maunahan

Robert L. McConnell

J no. N. Travis ,

Thomas II. Thoriibaugh.,

Oramel G. Daniels

Stephen Strange

David S. Koons

Lester V. McKisson ,

Lucien Abbott



3(1,



July



Aug.
Nov. 2">,
Feb. 6, :
March 11,
April 29,
w 26,



June
Sept.
Oct.



Feb.
Jan.



DATE OF RANK.



17,



June 4, 1861



16.
23,

1,'

1",
14,

7,
20,



March 4,

Jan. 20,

March 3,

3,

" 3,

" • 3,

" 3,



July

Aug.

Nov.

March

April

June

Oct.



Feb.



July



Feb. 22,
March II,
11,
Feb. ti,
April 29,



Sept.
June
Sept.
Oct.
Juno
Nov.
Jan.
Oct.
Jan.



March 4,
lau. 20,



COM. ISSUED.



18,
28,
6,
9,
30,
25,
20,
in,
3,
15,
15,
]-">,
IS,
15,
16,
16,
16,



April
June
March



June 4, lRf.l



July
Aug.
March
April

May

June
Aug.
Oct.



Nov.
Feb.



April
Jau.



REMARKS.



Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 16, lc62.

Not mustered in.

Promoted to Captain. [17, 1862,

Died Sept. 23, 1862; wounded at Antietaui Sept.

Promoted to Captain March II, 1862.

Honorably discharged January 7, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 26. 1862.

Detached as Aide-de-Camp to Gen. Kimball.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 29. 1862.

Promoted to Captain. [17, 1862.

Died Oct. 7, 1862; wounded at Antietam, Sept.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died July 3, 1.863.

Mustered out Aug. 31 , '62 ; resigned Feb. 10, '63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Dismissed as 2d Lieutenant October 17, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Revoked.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted February 6, 1862.

Promoted.

Resigned June 11, 1862.

Not mustered in.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 11, 1862.

Rilled at Antietam September 17, 1862.

Resigned February 22, 1862.

Promoted June 16, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned March II, 1S62.

Promoted Oct. 1, 1862; discharged Oct. 17, W

Promoted April 29, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Dismissed March 23, 18i>3.

Killed September 17, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. • .

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged DecenibSr 9, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. • .

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. ;

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Transferred to Fourth Battalion.



Vol. II.— 5.



66 Ohio in the Wae.



EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY was originally organized
as a three months' regiment, under the first call of the President, most of the companies
having been enlisted between the 16th and 22d days of April, 1861, and all of them arriv-
ing at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, as early as April 29th.

On the 2d of May, all the companies having been mustered into the service, the regiment
was ordered to Camp Dennison, where it arrived on the 3d, during a drenching rain, and many
of the men, for the first time in their lives, slept in the open air, with only a soldier's blanket
for floor, roof, walls, and bedclothes.

The regimental organization ATas here completed by the appointment of the field and
staff officers.

Instructions in the " drill " now commenced, and vigorous efforts were put forth to fit the
regiment for service ; but it soon became evident that the troops at this camp would not be sent
to the field as three months' men, and an effort was made to re-enlist the regiment for three
years. To this every company responded except company I, and the regiment of nine compa-
nies was mustered into the service for three years on the 22d, 25th, and 26th of June.

In the following September company I joined the regiment at Grafton, Virginia.

On the ninth day of July, 1861, the regiment left Camp Dennison for Grafton, Virginia,
and on the 12th arrived at West Union, Preston county, Virginia, on the summit of the Alle-
ghany Mountains where they are crossed by the Great Western Turnpike, and along which Gar-
nett's Rebel army was then being rapidly driven by McClellan's troops.

For some weeks after this the regiment was stationed at various places among the mount-
ains and along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, during which time it suffered severely from
typhoid fever, which the men believed to have been contracted at a camp which they will long
remember as " Maggotty Hollow." At one time over three hundred were in hospital, and some
thirty-four deaths resulted from the fever in a short space of time.

On the 24th of September the regiment participated in an attack on Romney. At the
" Hanging Rock " it was exposed to a severe fire, and lost several men in killed, and a number
wounded. The regiment again participated in an attack on Romney, October 24th ; which,
being evacuated by the enemy, was occupied by the troops under General Kelley until the 12th
of January, 1862. From this place the regiment participated in a brisk and successful attack
on Blue's Gap. General Lander assumed command of the department and removed the troops
to Patterson's Creek in January, and in February to Pawpaw Tunnel. On the 14fh of February
the Eighth participated in a brisk fight at Bloomey Gap, in which Colonel Baldwin, with hia
staff and part of his command were captured. The gallant Lander died on the 2d of March,
and shortly after the division moved to the Shenandoah Valley, where General Shields took
command. The enemy having evacuated Winchester, Shields followed them up the Valley, and
on the 18th and 19th of March fought sharply at Cedar Creek and Strasburg. In these actions
the Eighth acted as skirmishers, and established at once a reputation for that kind of duty, which
It maintained throughout its term of service.



Eighth Ohio Infantry. 67

On the 22d the outposts at Winchester were attacked by Ashby, and in a brisk battle Gen-
eral Shields was severely wounded. The next day the battle of Winchester was fought. But
few of the troops had ever been under fire, and none of them, as then organized, in any serious
engagements. Colonel Kimball commanded, and made his arrangements to whip Stonewall
Jackson, who had arrived during the night. The battle was one of the most severe of the war.
Jackson, toward evening, attempted to turn our right flank, but was met by Tyler's brigade in
front, when Colonel Kimball threw several regiments on hi3 right flank, and after a desperate
fight, which in some instances was hand to hand, the enemy was routed and driven furiously
from the field.

The Eighth was deployed as skirmishers, both the evening before and on the morning of
this engagement. Toward evening the right wing was withdrawn from the skirmish line and
participated in the charge on the enemy's right flank. The killed and wounded of the Eighth
amounted to over one-fourth the number engaged. The companies engaged were C, E, D, and
H. The loss in the other companies was two killed and eight wounded.

During the months of March and April the regiment followed the enemy up the Valley,
skirmishing with him at Woodstock, Mount Jackson, Edinburgh, and New Market. At the
latter place Colonel Kimball received his commission as Brigadier-General, and became com-
mander of the brigade in which the Eighth was. On the 12th of May the regiment started for
Fredericksburg to join McDowell's corps, where it arrived on the 22d, and on the 23d was
reviewed by President Lincoln. On the 25th, Jackson having driven General Banks out of the
Valley, the division was ordered back to the Valley, and on the 30th reached and recaptured
Front Royal. The Eighth skirmished from Rectortown, a distance of eighteen miles. Among
the prisoners captured was the famous Belle Boyd.

From Front Royal, Shield's division marched up the South Branch of the Shenandoah,
while Fremont's artillery could be heard as he pushed Jackson rapidly up the North Branch.

Shield's division was now broken up, and Kimball's and Terry's brigades ordered to the
Peninsula, arriving at Harrison's Landing on the 1st of July. On the 3d and 4th of July the
Eighth was thrown out toward the Chickahominy swamps, having on each day a brisk skirmish,
losing seven severely wounded.

The army remained at Harrison's until the 16th of August, during which time it participated
in a reconnoissance to Malvern Hill, and was while here united to the Second Corps, then
commanded by Sumner. The Eighth was with Kimball's brigade, in French's division. With
this corps it continued to act during the remainder of its service.

When the army retreated the Second Corps acted as rear guard until the army crossed the
Chickahominy, and from thence marched by Yorktown to Newport News, when it was embarked
in transports and taken to Alexandria, arriving on the 28th. On the 30th the roar of battle
between Lee and Pope could be distinctly heard, and at noon the corps commenced a rapid
march to the front, but only arrived at Centerville in time to witness the massing, at that place,
of Pope's army. The next day the march toward Chain Bridge commenced, the Second Corps
being on the left flank. The Eighth in this march was only once under fire, and that at Ger-
mantown, a few miles north of Fairfax C. H.

The Potomac was crossed at Chain Bridge, and the march through Maryland commenced,
which ended in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. The corps came up as a support-
ing line at South Mountain, but was not actively engaged, but crossed the mountain and skir-
mished with the enemy at Boonsboro' and Reedyville. Near this place the whole army was
massed by the morning of the 16th of September, and a furious artillery duel commenced. One
of the first of the enemy's shots killed W. W. Farmer, a color-sergeant of the Eighth. This
cannonade lasted all day. The next day the battle of Antietam was fought. The Second Corps
crossed the river and occupied the center of the line. Hooker had been engaged on the right for
several hours, when French's and Sedgwick's divisions advanced — Sedgwick on the right — and
met the enemy in strong position on a ridge. In the advance, Kimball's brigade formed the
third line, Morris and Max Weber's preceding. They struck the Rebel line and were driven



68 Ohio in the War.

back ; when Kimball advanced at a double-quick, carrying the line handsomely, and holding it
for four hours, and until firing ceased in front. During this time Sedgwick was driven back
on the right, which made it necessary for the Fourteenth Indiana and Eighth Ohio to change
front ; which was done most gallantly, and saved the brigade from rout. General Sumner pro-
nounced Kimball's the " Gibraltar Brigade."

The regiment moved with its corps to Bolivar Heights, from whence, on the 1st of October,
it participated in a reconnoissance to Leesburg. From this place the regiment moved with the
army to Falmouth, participating in skirmishes at Hulltown, Snicker's Gap, United States
Ford, etc.

In the terrible battle of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of December, the Eighth formed the
right wing of the forlorn hope ; the Fourth Ohio and First Delaware forming the left. The
Eighth passed up Hanover street by the left flank, in order to deploy to form line with tbe other
regiments which marched out lower down. Before the regiment cleared the street the Rebel
fire struck the head of the column, killing and wounding twenty-eight ; the other regiments also
lost heavily, but the line was formed, and the enemy's outposts driven in to the foot of the hill
on which were his main works. Here the line was to halt, seeking cover, for the main line to
advance, but no line could reach it; column after column, for hours, was broken and driven
back by the terrible shower of missiles passing over this line, which at dusk was withdrawn.
In this battle the killed and wounded numbered thirty-seven.

The army remained in camp until the 28th of April, 1863, when it crossed the river and
fought the battle of Chancellorsviile. In this battle the regiment was almost constantly under
fire for four days, but its loss was only two killed and eleven wounded. The brigade was at
this time and subsequently commanded by General Carroll.

No further active service was had until the Gettysburg campaign. In that battle the regi-
ment bore a conspicuous part. On the afternoon of the 2d of July it was thrown forward
beyond the Emmetsburg road, to take and hold a knoll, from which the Rebel sharpshooters



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